Learning Beyond the Classroom

Providing a valuable education depends a great deal on what happens outside of the classroom. That’s why we work hard to assist our students in graduating with less debt, in experiencing a variety of professional development opportunities, and in gaining the hands-on experience that makes a difference in a job search. 

Southeast Debate 

Going strong since the 1930’s, Southeast Debate is a highly successful and award-winning program. It gives students of any major the opportunity to sharpen and show off their oral communication skills within the argumentative arena. Since its founding, Southeast Debate has received impressive awards, including being ranked first in the nation in 2001-2002 by the National Educational Debate Association. Our program has also enjoyed national championships three years consecutively: 2015-2016, 2016-2017, and 2017-2018 and placing in the top 5 nationally in 2021. As a part of its long, proud tradition, Southeast Debate is a member of Pi Kappa Delta, the national honor society for speech and debate. Our chapter originated in 1932. 

Congratulations Southeast Debate, 
Three-time National Champions of the National Educational Debate Association! 

2015-2016, Los Angeles, CA 
2016-2017, Anderson, IN 
2017-2018, Pittsburgh, PA 

2020-2021-Placed 5th virtually 

Follow Southeast Debate on Facebook & Twitter. 

Add More Than a Degree to Your Resume 

We look for every opportunity to give our students a competitive edge, to further your education by giving you professional experience as well as a degree. Employers look for detail-oriented self-starters who can work conscientiously and independently. Internships are one of the ways you can get real-world experience.  

Information for Internships

Determine whether you qualify 


To qualify for SC 483: Internship, a student must have: 

  • Satisfactorily completed 18 hours of Communication Studies' courses (classes with an SC prefix and UI 301, 320, 345, 423, 425, or 504.) 
  • Your Degree Works worksheet will provide this information. 
  • Identified a site/experience that can be deemed "worthy" of an internship. 
  • Determined that the time is right to do so. 
  • The internship requires a serious time commitment. 150 hours must be completed on-site. For this reason, the internship is best undertaken during the summer or during a semester when you are enrolling in a fairly light load of classes.  
  • Followed the procedures to gain approval 

Identify one or more internship opportunities 

Finding an ideal internship is essentially the same as a job search, and that experience, in-and-of-itself is a valuable one, helping prepare you for "the real deal." Hence, searching for an internship is an important part of the process. You do not have to go it alone. 

Embrace the search experience and you will likely produce good results. Impress your Internship Coordinator with what you turn up as possibilities (This is the next step of the process). 

Schedule an initial meeting with the Internship Coordinator 

When you’ve found one or more ideal possibilities for an internship, it’s time to consult your Internship Coordinator. You’ll need the following: 

  • Internship Application - providing specifics on how you qualify and what you’d like to do as an intern (and where and why). 
  • Whatever information is necessary to “make the case” for a particular internship. 

 
Be ready to discuss how the internship seems ideal for you in terms of your training, interests, and goals. 
 
Be aware of and able to discuss any special requirements for a particular internship. For instance, hospitals and government agencies may require a background check and/or personal liability insurance and/or medical records and/or medical screenings or tests or immunizations.  
 

 

After assembling these materials, it’s time to make an appointment. Here’s who to contact, designated by major. 

Corporate Comm (BS) 

Professor Slavica Kodish 
Academic Hall, 237G 
(573) 651-2493 
skodish@semo.edu 

 

Professor Paul Madlock 
Academic Hall, 237 F 
(573) 651-2514 
pmadlock@semo.edu 

 

Health Comm (BS) 

Professor Brooke Clubbs 
Academic Hall, 237E 
(573) 651-2521 
bclubbs@semo.edu 

 

Comm Studies (BA) 

Non - medical settings: Professor Kodish and Professor Madlock 

Medical settings: Professor Clubbs 

Apply for the internship 

This process will vary, from place to place, but generally you will indicate your interest (in a letter of application), provide a resume, and request an interview. 

 

Career Services can assist you with your resume and letter of application, as well as provide pointers for an interview. If you've taken SC 330: Corporate & Professional Communication (or MG 252: Business Communication), you gained invaluable insights for the resume and other application materials. In SC 330 as well as SC 335: Interviewing, we also provide tips for a successful interview. 

  • Arrive about ten minutes early. 
  • Dress appropriately for the position sought. 
  • Be able to discuss how your training, experience, and goals make you a good fit. 
  • Let them see that you are eager to learn and will value the experience. 
  • Let them see that you are dependable, pleasant, and easy to work with. 

 

If the organization offers you an internship, they’ll need to complete our Internship Agreement This form ensures everyone is “on the same page” by providing a detailed description of your duties. The onsite supervisor has an obligation to see that you have an adequate opportunity to gain information and/or skills to enhance your career possibilities and to utilize/augment what you’ve learned in your classes at Southeast. 

Internship Agreement Form

Meet with the Internship Coordinator for final approval 

When you’ve been offered an Internship, it’s time to meet with the Internship Coordinator again and make the final sales pitch. 

To do so, bring along the following items: 

  • Internship Application (possibly revised since the initial meeting) 
  • Internship Agreement Form (signed by on-site supervisor 
  • Letter of Application (possibly revised since the initial meeting) 
  • Resume (possibly revised since the initial meeting) 
  • Liability Release 
  • Any special forms required by that particular internship (e.g., Liability Release and Limited Power of Attorney 

 

Enroll in SC 483 

Once the Internship Coordinator has all of your materials and is convinced that the internship is, indeed, a good experience, she will recommend “approval” to the department chairperson. After the department chairperson has signed off, you will have permission to enroll in SC 483. (Note: You will actually do the enrolling, yourself.) 

As a student in SC 483, you will report regularly to the Internship Coordinator, who will serve as the instructor for the course. 

To earn credit for the course, do as follows: 

Keep a running log of what you have learned.

Collect two work samples, illustrative of your work 

After logging 150 hours, complete the Self-Evaluation & Site Review (which we discuss in step seven: Finalize). 


Finalize 

We hope the internship has been a great experience for you. Now is the time to wrap up. 

  1. To derive the best learning requires reflection. Reflect upon your experience by completing the Self-Evaluation & Site Review. 
  2. We also want to “see” what you did. Please provide two representative work samples. 
  3. We can also benefit from what your onsite supervisor has to say. Please remind your onsite supervisor to 

Leave a lasting impression 

We appreciate the opportunity the On-Site Supervisor has provided. You — no doubt — appreciate it as well. A thank-you note is certainly in order, isn’t it? Hallmark, or the Southeast Bookstore likely has the perfect card. 

Catalog Description and Credit Hours of Course: 

Work experience using French in a professional setting in a business or agency. (3 credit hours) 

 

Prerequisites: 

 
  • Declared French major 
  • Junior standing, with completion of a minimum of 24 credit hours in French 
  • Minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a GPA of 3.0 in French 
  • Approval of the Department of Foreign Languages 

 

Purposes and objectives of the course: 

 
  • To provide exceptional French majors with the opportunity for professional work experience using French language skills 
  • To provide the opportunity to work with professionals in the field 
  • To provide students with additional preparation for employment or admission to graduate schools. 

 

Expectations of students: 

 
  • To complete a minimum of 120 work hours in the business or agency 
  • To complete all work agreed upon by the course instructor and the field supervisor 
  • To keep a weekly journal with a record of activities 
  • To complete required outside readings which supplement the work experience 
  • To participate in meetings with the course instructor 
  • To submit to the instructor a final course project evaluating and integrating all aspects of the experience 

 

Expectations of the Instructor: 

 
  • To maintain contact with the field supervisor in order to coordinate the work of the intern 
  • To coordinate outside readings with the activities of the intern 
  • To meet regularly with the intern for progress reports and discussions of readings 
  • To review the student's journal on a regular basis, evaluate the course project, and assign a grade 

 

Course Content or Outline: 

Course content varies with the internship setting. Course content is established by the field supervisor in conjunction with the course instructor. Activities may include reading and/or translating material in the foreign language, writing summaries, providing telephone communication, and completing other foreign language tasks as needed by the host business or agency. 

 

Textbook: 

No textbook is required. Materials needed vary according to the work setting. students are required to read outside material which they may purchase or obtain from the library. 

 

Basis for Student Evaluation: 

Evaluation of field supervisor-35% 
Participation in discussion of readings-20% 
Student's journal-20% 
Final course project-25% 

 

Application Process: 

Students with exceptional language skills are eligible to apply for internships as they become available. Students must complete an Internship Application available in the Foreign Language Department. Acceptance is based upon the student's language proficiency, academic record, and recommendations by professors. Final determination depends on matching a student's skills and interests with the needs of a business or agency. 

Catalog Description and Credit Hours of Course:

 
Work experience using German in a professional setting in a business or agency. (3 credit hours) 

 

Prerequisites: 

 
  • Declared German major 
  • Junior standing, with completion of a minimum of 24 credit hours in German 
  • Minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a GPA of 3.0 in German 
  • Approval of the Department of Modern Languages, Anthropology and Geography 

 

Purposes and objectives of the course: 

 
  • To provide exceptional German majors with the opportunity for professional work experience using German language skills 
  • To provide the opportunity to work with professionals in the field 
  • To provide students with additional preparation for employment or admission to graduate schools. 

 

Expectations of students: 

 
  • To complete a minimum of 120 work hours in the business or agency 
  • To complete all work agreed upon by the course instructor and the field supervisor 
  • To keep a weekly journal with a record of activities 
  • To complete required outside readings which supplement the work experience 
  • To participate in meetings with the course instructor 
  • To submit to the instructor a final course project evaluating and integrating all aspects of the experience 

 

Expectations of the Instructor: 

 
  • To maintain contact with the field supervisor in order to coordinate the work of the intern 
  • To coordinate outside readings with the activities of the intern 
  • To meet regularly with the intern for progress reports and discussions of readings 
  • To review the student's journal on a regular basis, evaluate the course project, and assign a grade 

 

Course Content or Outline:

 
Course content varies with the internship setting. Course content is established by the field supervisor in conjunction with the course instructor. Activities may include reading and/or translating material in the foreign language, writing summaries, providing telephone communication, and completing other foreign language tasks as needed by the host business or agency. 

 

Textbook: 

No textbook is required. Materials needed vary according to the work setting. students are required to read outside material which they may purchase or obtain from the library. 

 

Basis for Student Evaluation: 

Evaluation of field supervisor-35% 
Participation in discussion of readings-20% 
Student's journal-20% 
Final course project-25% 

 

Application Process: 

Students with exceptional language skills are eligible to apply for internships as they become available. Students must complete an Internship Application available in the Foreign Language Department. Acceptance is based upon the student's language proficiency, academic record, and recommendations by professors. Final determination depends on matching a student's skills and interests with the needs of a business or agency. 

Catalog Description and Credit Hours of Course: 

Work experience using Spanish in a professional setting in a business or agency. (3 credit hours) 

 

Prerequisites: 

 
  • Declared Spanish major 
  • Junior standing, with completion of a minimum of 24 credit hours in Spanish 
  • Minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a GPA of 3.0 in Spanish 
  • Approval of the Department of Modern Languages, Anthropology and Geography 

 

Purposes and objectives of the course: 

 
  • To provide exceptional Spanish majors with the opportunity for professional work experience using Spanish language skills 
  • To provide the opportunity to work with professionals in the field 
  • To provide students with additional preparation for employment or admission to graduate schools. 

 

Expectations of students: 

 
  • To complete a minimum of 120 work hours in the business or agency 
  • To complete all work agreed upon by the course instructor and the field supervisor 
  • To keep a weekly journal with a record of activities 
  • To complete required outside readings which supplement the work experience 
  • To participate in meetings with the course instructor 
  • To submit to the instructor a final course project evaluating and integrating all aspects of the experience 

 

Expectations of the Instructor: 

 
  • To maintain contact with the field supervisor in order to coordinate the work of the intern 
  • To coordinate outside readings with the activities of the intern 
  • To meet regularly with the intern for progress reports and discussions of readings 
  • To review the student's journal on a regular basis, evaluate the course project, and assign a grade. 

 

Course Content or Outline: 

Course content varies with the internship setting. Course content is established by the field supervisor in conjunction with the course instructor. Activities may include reading and/or translating material in the foreign language, writing summaries, providing telephone communication, and completing other foreign language tasks as needed by the host business or agency. 

 

Textbook: 

No textbook is required. Materials needed vary according to the work setting. students are required to read outside material which they may purchase or obtain from the library. 

 

Basis for Student Evaluation: 

Evaluation of field supervisor - 35% 
Participation in discussion of readings - 20% 
Student's journal - 20% 
Final course project - 25% 

 

Application Process: 

Students with exceptional language skills are eligible to apply for internships as they become available. Students must complete an Internship Application available in the Foreign Language Department. Acceptance is based upon the student's language proficiency, academic record, and recommendations by professors. Final determination depends on matching a student's skills and interests with the needs of a business or agency. 

Get Connected on Campus

Student organizations in your major can provide you the opportunity to connect with other students who share your academic interests and your classes! Plus, academic student organizations are beneficial for your future career.

Study Abroad

Ecuador 
Quito - Universidadde las Americas 

France 
Angers - Université d'Angers 

Germany 
Dortmund - Technische Universität Dortmund 
Jena - Friedrich-Schiller-Universität 

Spain 
Leon - Universidad León 

Tuition and an administrative fee of $250/semester are paid at Southeast for each of these exchanges. 

Study Abroad at SEMO

Quito, Ecuador 
Wintersession, last week of December and the first week of January 
Contact: 
(573) 651-2061 

  • Stay with a host family and learn Spanish in context 
  • Visit Otavalo: shop the largest indigenous market worldwide, hike around Cuicocha Lake and visit Peguche Falls 
  • Visit Mindo and hike through a cloud forest 
  • Hike through the Andes mountains 

Taipei, Taiwan 
Beginning of Summer Session in May 
Contact: 
Dr. Shu Chuan Wang-McGrath 
(573) 651-2061 

  • Stay in Taipei in Ximen, one of the most famous areas of Taipei 
  • See the National Museum, Taipei 101, Chiang Kai Shek and Sun Yat Sen Memorial Halls 
  • Visit Wulai, an indigenous town in the mountains 
  • Travel to various cities in Taiwan such as Kinmen, Kaohsiung or Hualien 
  • No Chinese language knowledge needed 

Munich, Germany 
Wintersession, last week of December and the first week of January 
Contact: 
Dr. Fred Poston 
(573) 651-2061 

Location
Office Location
Academic Hall 213
Mailing Location
One University Plaza, MS 3225
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701