Social
Location
Brandt Hall 328

MOST RECENT/NOTABLE PUBLISHED WORK

Kilburn, M. (in print). Prison recreation. Criminal Justice in America: The Encyclopedia of Crime, Law Enforcement, Courts and Corrections. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

Kilburn, M. (in print). Hands-off Doctrine. Criminal Justice in America: The Encyclopedia of Crime, Law Enforcement, Courts and Corrections. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

Kilburn, M., Radu, M. & Henckell, M. (in print). Conceptual & Theoretical Frameworks of CRT Pedagogy. Care & Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Online Settings. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.

Kilburn, M., Henckell, M., & Starrett, D. (2018). Factors contributing to the effectiveness of online students and instructors. Information Science and Technology (4rd ed.). 1451-1463.

Kilburn, M., Unterreiner, J. & Wade, J. (2017). Voices of the Success & Revoked: The Probationer’s Perspective. Section on Restorative and Community Justice. ACJS Newsletter, (7)1, 3-6.

Kilburn, M., Krieger, L., Cecil, C., Moravec, L. (2016). The role of Facebook in policing: Linking law enforcement and the community. In Scott W. Phillips & Dilip K. Das (eds) Change and Reform in Law Enforcement. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press Taylor & Francis.

Blasdell, R., Kilburn, M., & Wade, J (2016). What a difference a Day Makes: GLS and Offender Restoration. Section on Restorative and Community Justice. ACJS Newsletter, (6)1, 12-14.

Kilburn, M., Henckell, M., & Starrett, D. (2016). Instructor driven strategies for establishing and sustaining social presence. In Lydia Kyei-Blankson, Joseph Blankson, Esther Ntuli, & Cynthia Agyeman (eds) Handbook of Research on Strategic Management of Interaction, Presence, and Participation in Online Courses. Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.

Kilburn, M. (2016). Getting to Know You: Establishing Instructor Presence. Southeast Missouri State University Tech Talk, (3), 23-25.

Kilburn, M., Henckell, M, Starrett, D. (2015). Attributes of successful online students and instructors. Information Science and Technology (3rd ed.). 7497-7506.

Henckell, M., Kilburn, M., & Starrett, D. (2015). Components of a distance education evaluation system. Information Science and Technology (3rd ed.). 643-651.

Kilburn, M. & Krieger, L. (2014). Policing in an information age: The prevalence of state and local law enforcement agencies utilizing the world wide web to connect with the community. Journal of Police Science & Management, 13(3), 221-227.

WHAT AREA DO YOU TEACH?

I teach primarily research, methods, statistics, policy analysis, and leadership at the undergraduate and graduate levels. I also enjoy teaching introductory level or general education courses and meeting new students. Undergraduate courses I have taught at Southeast include: Introduction to Criminal Justice, Introduction to Law Enforcement, Introduction to Corrections, Juvenile Justice, Research Methods, Statistics for Social Scientists, Issues in Justice Administration, Crime and Human Behavior, and Drugs and Behavior. Graduate courses I have taught: Crime and Policy, Research Methods, Seminar in Leadership Practice, Death Penalty in America and Law and Social Control.

EDUCATION/DEGREE(S)

Ed.D. In Educational Leadership. University of Missouri – Columbia
Dissertation Topic: Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning
M.S.A. Public Administration. Southeast Missouri State University
Emphasis: Criminal Justice Administration
Thesis Topic: Exploratory and Descriptive Study of the Weed and Seed Program in Southeast Missouri

YOUR PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING:

“Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” ~William Butler Yeats I enjoy interacting with my students. I feel a liberal arts institution is the perfect environment to discuss and debate multiple perspectives and celebrate diversity. I want my students to develop the skill of being critical consumers of research, media, etc. and appreciate the value of evidence-based decision-making.

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO TEACH?

As a graduate of the criminal justice program at Southeast, I truly valued the student-focused faculty and staff at Southeast. I wanted to be a part of something that made me feel I was making a difference in the lives of others. It is an honor to establish relationships with students who then go on to do great things and make a difference.

AWARD/HONOR/RECOGNITION

Provost Award: Excellence in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (2018)
CSIS: Center for Strategic and International Studies (2106)
College of Health and Human Services Award for Outstanding Teaching (2014)
College of Health and Human Services Award for Outstanding Service (2016)
Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology Award for Outstanding Teaching (2014, 2013, 2012)
Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology Award for Outstanding Research (2013)
Department of Criminal Justice and Sociology Award for Outstanding Service (2016, 2017)
SOTL Fellowship Award (2012)

BEST ADVICE FOR STUDENTS

Take in everything the college experience has to offer!

Establish a rapport with your teachers early on in your academic career. You will be surprised the opportunities that will develop over the next four years. Most of us are here because we want a connection with our students. Come see us!

Engage with your peers. You may never have the opportunity again to develop relationships with such diversity and perspective (age, ethnicity, geography, culture, religion, identity, etc). We all learn from each other. We will be better together.

Develop/Enhance the skills that will help you be successful in life. Use this time to develop time-management skills, financial responsibility, independence, self-discipline, etc. These skills will help you be successful in college as well as prepare you for success in your professional career.

Always look for the positive. Things may, and probably will, get hard in your academic journey. Even just a glimmer of hope can make all the difference: Find a hobby, get a pet, call your parents.

Engage with your peers. You may never have the opportunity again to develop relationships with such diversity and perspective.

Michelle Kilburn, Professor