Social
Location
Rhodes Hall 306
I am a physicists with expertise in computational and experimental molecular biophysics, single molecule imaging, optical tweezers, molecular motors, and other processes. Additionally, I have advised undergraduate research projects in the areas of sports physics (golf and baseball), super computing, gravitational waves, and magnetic nano materials.

WHAT AREA DO YOU TEACH?

Physics and Engineering

EDUCATION/DEGREE(S)

B.S. in Mathematics, Engineering Physics, & Mathematics from Southeast Missouri State University, 2010
Ph.D. in Physics from Washington University in St. Louis, 2015

YOUR PHILOSOPHY OF TEACHING:

I measure my success as an instructor on the performance of my entire class. I want every student to be elevated to success, despite the challenge of grabbing the attention of a 60 person lecture. I can still remember, as a student, watching the clock and waiting for the moment that I could leave class. In contrast, I try to make as many of my classes the type that make a student think, "Wow, are we done already!"

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO TEACH?

My father was a coal miner, and my mother was a beautician. They pushed me to find a career path outside of the mines. Southeast Missouri State University provided me with a quality education and the experience that I needed to discover my true potential and calling. Now I want to do the same for the current students at Southeast.

CREDENTIALS/CAREER PATH

After completing my dissertation at Washington University in St. Louis, I worked for two years as a Postdoctoral Research Assistant at the Washington University School of Medicine. I studied diseases associated with cilia and flagella.

ORGANIZATION WITH WHICH YOU ARE INVOLVED

Biophysics Society
SEMO Physics & Engineering Club
Sigma Pi Sigma - National Physics Honor Society
National Society of Leadership & Success
Phi Kappa Phi - National Interdisciplinary Honor Society

BEST ADVICE FOR STUDENTS

No one can teach you as much as you can learn.

I want every student to be elevated to success, despite the challenge of grabbing the attention of a 60 person lecture. I can still remember, as a student, watching the clock and waiting for the moment that I could leave class. In contrast, I try to make as many of my classes the type that make a student think, "Wow, are we done already!"

Jonathan Kessler, Professor