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Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Students will learn and apply scientific methods of observing cultural and social behavior. Provides foundation for anthropological study of culture.

Course Content

This course helps students learn the skills necessary to objectively observe other cultures free of personal bias and ethnocentrism. The student masters a series of skills which allows her/him to view the world in the same terms informants from another culture or subculture use to view their world. The skills learned help avoid conflicts based on cultural misunderstanding.

Nature of Course

This course emphasizes experiential learning. The student will learn to use techniques rather than simply memorizing them. Students will participate in, and observe, a culture or subculture significantly different from their own. They will keep detailed observational notes on their encounters and a personal journal based on their experiences. They will analyze their observations of the other culture and will present a written report (ethnography) describing the rules by which the observed culture generates and interprets social behavior. This is a laboratory course which requires the student to spend 40 or more hours observing her/his chosen culture.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to be informed participants in class discussion groups. They are expected to be able to describe the culture they observed as seen by the cultures insiders. Students are expected to master the basic concepts and skills of observing other cultures and to demonstrate their mastery in a written report (ethnography).

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Fundamentals of cultural anthropology, including its development as a discipline and perspectives on culture, language, kinship, family, subsistence, religion, and globalization.

Course Content

Students will learn the science of plants grown for food and other human and animal uses. They will gain an understanding of, and an appreciation for the history of food production and the progression of agriculture to the present. Each student will gain an appreciation of where and how their food and fiber is produced, even though most people in the USA are not directly involved with food production. The aesthetics of plants for landscaping, public parks and golf courses will also be studied.

Nature of Course

n/a

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to participate in their groups when problems are presented in class
  2. Tests are designed to evaluate student competency and understanding of the biological principles of plant growth and development, production practices, cropping systems, as well as the history, uses, marketing and utilization of agricultural products
  3. During the sections on Plant Growth and Development, and Pests and Diseases, students will be assigned a crop (either field or horticultural), and will outline the factors that growers have control over that will affect growth and development or pest control. They will learn the decision-making processes required to grow crops profitably, and how to incorporate environmentally-sound production practices
  4. Students will work in groups to write a term paper on a minor crop of economic value. Students are expected to follow the guidelines for writing the paper, which will be given to them when the assignment is made. This includes writing the paper using MLA format, proper in-text citations and Works Cited, covering the subject assigned, and doing so with proper grammar, sentence structure, word choice and overall paper structure
  5. Students are expected to present their findings to the class. This will include individual presentations with the first two assignments on Plant growth and Development, and Pests and Diseases. Group presentations will be the culminating exercise from the final term paper for the class.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

A study of the history and culture of the deaf, including an introduction to Signed English designed to enable students to communicate with and develop a basic understanding of persons in the deaf community.

Course Content

This course is an introduction to the use of communication methods and will provide a basic understanding of an exposure to issues relating to the deaf culture.

Students will have experience with the use of a variety of manual communication systems which will assist them in communicating with persons who are hearing impaired or deaf.

Cultural content of this course will allow students to develop an understanding of the cognitive and emotional development, social barriers, educational and occupational issues, cultural biases and family issues of persons who are deaf. The historical perspective of the deaf community will also be included. Students will develop communication skills and cultural knowledge through interaction with persons who are deaf.

Nature of Course

This is a participation course which emphasizes active learning and experience in interacting with persons who are deaf. Class activities include Signed English practice demonstrations, guest speakers, video presentations, lecture, and class discussion.

Student Expectations

The course will include frequent quizzes covering reception and expression of Signed English vocabulary, periodic exams covering sign vocabulary and deaf culture, and literature and video reviews. Students will be expected to attend presentations by guest speakers. Grades are based on the composite of student quizzes, exams, literature and video reviews, and class participation.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Insights into relating to others through the framework of dating, committed relationships, family and friends.

Course Content

This course provides an understanding of relationships and families within a social historical context. Students examine the interrelationship of a variety of topics including: diversity, gender socialization, dating/marriage, sexuality, parenting, divorce/remarriage, and balancing work and family.

Nature of Course

Textbook readings, lecture, discussion, PowerPoint and videos will be used to present course information. Students will work individually and in cooperative learning teams. Numerous opportunities will be provided for students to exercise oral and written communication skills. Self assessment is emphasized.

Student Expectations

Course evaluation will include grades on student participation in class activities, particularly self assessment questionnaires and quizzes. Grades on two papers focused on self evaluation in personal relationships and scores on three multiple choice exams will also contribute to the final grade.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Exploration of race, ethnicity, social class, and gender issues in schooling today.

Course Content

The study of diversity issues in the schools is explored through a variety of perspectives. The formation of the cultural composition of the United States serves as an introduction to the course. Particular focus is then given to conceptual frameworks of racial, ethnic, social class, and gender identity development, current equity issues, and post-modern critiques of schooling.

Nature of Course

The course involves a significant amount of reading and writing. Assigned reading comes primarily from the textbook and reserve materials. These readings draw from the literatures of schooling, ethnic history and identity development, and post-modernist studies. Assigned writing varies from informal reflective pieces to formal essays and term projects. It is expected that the writing will demonstrate both creative and critical thinking skills. Group projects include informal debates and role plays. Class sessions are mainly interactive, combining short lectures with small and whole group discussions. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to actively contribute and participate in these discussions.

Student Expectations

  1. Complete all written, oral, and group assignments in a timely manner.
  2. Actively prepare readings and research for participation in class.
  3. Show satisfactory performance on the exams.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsEconomic Systems

Catalog Description

Exploration and application of elements and principles of fashion. Examines fashion fundamentals including history, economics, international scope, sustainability and trends.

Course Content

Overview and Global View of the Fashion Industry
European Fashion Influences
Early American Clothing Influences
Fashion Retrospection: 100+ Years of Fashion
Fundamentals of Fashion
Fashion Principles, Perspectives and Theories
Marketing Terminology and the 4Ps of Fashion Marketing
Fashion Analysis and Prediction
Fashion Branding
Textile Producers and Suppliers
Designers, Product Developers, and Fashion Manufacturers
Fashion Market Centers, Wholesalers and IntermediariesTextile and Apparel Legislation
Fashion Retailing Formats, Careers and Opportunities

Nature of Course

Students will define the profession of Fashion and Consumer Studies.
Students will identify and apply fashion principles and perspectives to apparel choices
Students will identify, the psychological and cultural factors affecting fashion.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to participate in class discussions, activities and to complete all assigned readings. Exams will be used to assess students’ understanding of classroom discussions.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Spatial treatment of ethnic diversity of the world's macro cultures (e.g. Europe) and contemporary social problems associated with economic development.

Course Content

The primary purpose of this course is to help students with limited geographic background to learn about the cultural-social complexity of the world. A secondary purpose of the course is to examine the benefits and problems of modern economic development on traditional cultural groups, thereby dividing the world into two unequal parts: Developed World and Developing World. These purposes will be accomplished through examining such contemporary social topics as effects of population growth on migration, urbanization, food supply, and resource management. Of lasting benefit to students is an enlarged interest and understanding of the world which can lead to a greater sense of social responsibility.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: Assignments will be made in the textbook. Additional reading assignments will include articles and chapters from other books.
  2. Emphasis on Writing: Writing assignments will include a class journal and short projects.
  3. Out-of-Class Project: A library assignment will be required in the use of atlases. Students will also receive class handouts to develop critical thinking skills.
  4. Teaching Format: Lectures and class discussions about relevant geographic topics will be used.

Student Expectations

Exams (3 or 4) will account for about 90% of the grade. These exams will be a combination of objective and short essay or paragraph questions. Class projects will be used to determine the remaining percentage.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Study of the interrelationship of the components of human cultures, i.e., belief, social and material systems. Emphasis on social geographic principles and issues.

Course Content

The purpose of this course is to make the student aware of geographic concepts involving major social and cultural issues e.g., population, ethnicity, politics, and urbanization. The course will provide a framework for interpreting major cultural patterns of the world e.g., language and religion. Drawing from this framework students will be better able to evaluate their own cultural attitudes about life in relation to values of other world cultures e.g., family size, food preferences, and religious decisions.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: Most of the assignments will be in the textbook.
  2. Group Discussions: Group discussions will focus on the influence of one's cultural background on social issues such as family size (2-3 in the course).
  3. Emphasis on Writing: Writing assignment in the form of a term paper.
  4. Teaching Format: Lectures and discussions about relevant topics will be used.

Student Expectations

Exams will account for 75% of the grade. These exams will be a combination of objective and short essay or paragraph questions. Class projects will be used to determine the remaining percentage.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

An examination of the media in the United States, emphasizing what impact they have upon society.

Course Content

The purposes of this course are

  • To provide a broad overview of the mass media processes, as shaped by both media managers and society.
  • To provide a broad overview of the mass media and their impact on society.
  • To help students become discerning consumers of the products of the mass media.
  • To develop the critical thinking skills necessary to evaluate issues that appear in the media.
  • To develop an appreciation for the contributions made by women and minorities to the media and media-support professions.

Nature of Course

In order to provide a contemporary overview of all media, this course includes lectures, discussions, written assignments and critiques of the news and entertainment media to emphasize mass media impact on life and culture in the United States.

Student Expectations

  1. All students are expected to complete required readings and participate in class discussions.
  2. Students will complete two writing assignments that compare and contrast newspaper articles on specified topics and a paper that analyzes the content of national broadcast television news.
  3. Students will complete four examinations (objective/essay questions).

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

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Catalog Description

Survey of the origins, development and practice of social science in the disciplines of history, political science, economics, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and geography.

Course Content

 

Nature of Course

 

Student Expectations

  1.  

Prerequisites

 

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

The study of interrelationships between society, culture, values and sport, and the ways in which they influence one another.

Course Content

Sport and Society provides a historical overview of the development of sport in America. It pays particular attention to the social and cultural sources contributing to the rise of sport in this country, and how sport then in turn both promotes and reflects the American value system. It also examines the symbiotic relationship that exists between sport and other societal institutions such as religion and politics. Finally, it closely examines societal ills such as racism and sexism and the extent to which they are prevalent in the world of sport.

Nature of Course

Sport and Society is a lecture/discussion class which examines the extent to which sport serves as a microcosm of American society. Students will be expected to take a stance on issues discussed in class which deal with the extent of racism and sexism in sport, and the use of sport to promote political systems. They will be expected to defend their stance through position papers, oral presentations, and class debates.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to:

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in discussions.
  2. Complete all written assignments.
  3. Participate in one class debate.
  4. Present one oral report.
  5. Complete all examinations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

perspectivescategory

Catalog Description

A study of basic concepts theories and issues in the organization of society, with attention to the problems of justice and economic distribution.

Course Content

The course examines different theories about how society ought to be organized, the origin and limits of social authority, the nature and needs of human beings, and the criteria for evaluating social arrangements. The course will typically address the following points.

  1. Man as a Social Animal
    1. Human nature and human needs
    2. How ought society to be organized to satisfy human needs?
  2. Human Nature and Legitimate Social Authority
    1. What is social authority?
    2. Human nature is inconsistent with legitimate social authority
    3. Human nature is consistent with legitimate social authority
      1. Classical Greek theories
      2. Early Christian theories
      3. Renaissance theories
      4. Enlightenment social contractarians
      5. Post-enlightenment social liberalism
      6. Post-enlightenment social conservatism
      7. Contemporary theories of the person in society
  3. Human Nature and the Problem of Relativism
    1. Relativism cultural and philosophical
    2. Cultural relativism and the methodology of the social sciences
  4. Justice and Economic Distribution
    1. Justice as desert
    2. Justice as fairness
    3. Justice as equal distribution of benefits and burdens

Nature of Course

This course is geared toward developing an understanding of various normative ethical theories, and the ability to apply those theories to problematic situations. Classes are a combination of lecture and discussion, and students will be expected to do considerable reading outside of class. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in class discussion. Students should also expect to maintain a notebook, write one or more short papers on assigned topics, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final examinations. No term paper.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Study of leisure and its impact on contemporary culture, diverse populations, and the lives of individuals.

Course Content

RC-100 examines the concepts and philosophical implications of leisure, work, play, games and recreation and how these concepts affect and reflect the lives of individuals and members of different societal groups. Students will examine the benefits of recreation and leisure as well as the constraints and problems sometimes associated with leisure. A feature of this course is to analyze individual patterns of participation and become familiar with developing life plans for leisure.

Nature of Course

RC-100 combines lecture, discussions, assigned readings, role playing, debates, problem solving activities, and student presentations. Students are required to research specific topics of interest to them by finding relevant literature and observing people involved in related leisure pursuits. Students are also required to document and analyze their own time use patterns to understand how their behavior patterns relate to the larger culture to which they belong.

Student Expectations

  1. Each student will participate in all class meetings and complete pertinent assignments and readings prior to class meetings.
  2. Each student will fully participate in experiential learning experiences as described by the course outline at the beginning of the semester.
  3. Each student will achieve satisfactory grades on tests, papers, oral presentations, class activities, and other assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

A study of major world religions, including an examination of various definitions and characteristics of religion as exemplified in the histories of religions and their impact on societies.

Course Content

Class lectures and reading assignments follow the textbook. The course materials cover indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Particular attention is given to the dynamic relationship between religion and its cultural setting. Attention will also be given to the growth of new religious movements.

Nature of Course

Students will be required to read the textbook in preparation for class lectures and discussions, as well as additional source materials related to the significant sacred literature of each religion.

In order to develop research and writing skills, each student will be required to write a short paper on the subject of what constitutes religion, and a medium-length paper on a new religions movement. In addition, each student will be required to compile a scrapbook with entries from each of the major world religions. Through reading assignments, written projects and classroom discussions students should receive a sound understanding of the religions of the world and develop an appreciation of their own and others' religious heritage.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in class discussions. In addition to the reading assignments and written projects, there will be two in-class examinations and a final examination. The examinations contain a mixture of completion and fill-in-the-blank statements, and may contain one or more discussion questions. Study sheets are provided for each major religion, and ample time is provided during class to ask questions for additional information and clarification.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Exploration of race, ethnicity, social class, and gender issues in schooling today.

Course Content

The study of diversity issues in the schools is explored through a variety of perspectives. The formation of the cultural composition of the United States serves as an introduction to the course. Particular focus is then given to conceptual frameworks of racial, ethnic, social class, and gender identity development, current equity issues, and post-modern critiques of schooling.

Nature of Course

The course involves a significant amount of reading and writing. Assigned reading comes primarily from the textbook and reserve materials. These readings draw from the literatures of schooling, ethnic history and identity development, and post-modernist studies. Assigned writing varies from informal reflective pieces to formal essays and term projects. It is expected that the writing will demonstrate both creative and critical thinking skills. Group projects include informal debates and role plays. Class sessions are mainly interactive, combining short lectures with small and whole group discussions. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to actively contribute and participate in these discussions.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to 1) complete all written, oral, and group assignments in a timely manner; 2) actively prepare readings and research for participation in class; 3) show satisfactory performance on the exams.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

A series of lectures, projects and group discussions analyzing the impact of society and culture on human social behavior.

Course Content

The impact of society and culture on human behavior is analyzed. The effects of values, social institutions, and culture on the human experience is emphasized within a scientific framework. In the concluding part of the course, the material will be evaluated and applied to selected controversial social issues.

Nature of Course

  1. Teaching format: A series of lectures, reports and group discussions will be used in the classroom.
  2. Emphasis on reading.
  3. Individual oral reports and group projects may be assigned by the instructor.
  4. Emphasis upon enhancing critical thinking.

Student Expectations

Attend class, take notes, participate in class discussions and role play, and satisfactorily complete class assignments and examinations. Examinations will normally include both objective and essay type of questions. Contact the individual instructor for more information.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

An analysis of urbanization, including city life and problems, land use patterns and the future of the city.

Course Content

The city as a way of life including norms, values, and relationships to material objects and the city as an ecological system including land use patterns and other aspects of the city as a geographic unit will be examined in this course. Theories and other conceptualizations of these two dimensions will be discussed and used to explore, clarify and examine possible solutions to specific social problems. Perspectives on the implementation of the solutions, including politics and city planning, and the future of the city will also be discussed. Domestic and world-wide illustrations will be used to clarify the concepts utilized in this course.

Nature of Course

Lecture, class discussion, and the textbook as well as specific class exercises will be used to clarify concepts and to introduce students to methods which can be used to study the city. Short writing assignments will allow students to conceptualize urban frameworks, to explore their use in solving urban problems and to express their ideas in written form.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate in class discussion.
  2. Read all assigned materials.
  3. Demonstrate mastery of course content on four examinations.
  4. Timely completion of two short written assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

This course explores knowledge, understanding, affirmation and respect for people from diverse backgrounds within their cultural contexts at the interpersonal level.

Course Content

Understanding Social and Cultural Diversity introduces conceptual and factual information regarding social and cultural diversity to promote understanding, affirmation and respect for human differences. One's own culture and personal values, as well as the context of dominant culture and its affect on various social and cultural groups, is examined. Particular emphasis is given to recognizing one's own culture and privilege and the effect of these factors on identity development and interpersonal relations.

Nature of Course

Much of the course is taught in a lecture format however, there is considerable emphasis on group discussion and student interaction.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to finish all required readings on time and come to class prepared to share ideas and discuss the assigned readings. The class includes tests, group discussion, and written assignments. Students are expected to actively engage the material while exploring their own cultural heritage, attitudes, values, and privilege.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2783
univstudies@semo.edu
Memorial Hall 210
General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 4180
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701