500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Origin and development of the English Language, including grammatical forms, principles of sound change, and growth of English vocabulary.

Course Content

  1. Basic linguistic concepts and interrelationship of language and culture.
  2. English phonology and phonemes.
  3. The Indo-European languages - a brief history of the people and their languages.
  4. Old English
  5. Middle English
  6. Early Modern English
  7. Present Day English

Nature of Course

Students will acquire

  1. An understanding of the systematic nature of historical linguistic principles and the specific changes characterizing the English language at its various stages.
  2. Knowledge of the intimate connections between language and culture.
  3. Understanding and appreciation of English literature through investigation of the linguistic context producing literary works.
  4. Ability to pursue directed research into the linguistic aspects of a particular discipline or subject.

Student Expectations

  1. Class attendance and participation.
  2. Completion of assigned readings and work sheets as required.
  3. Completion of brief, informal writings as required.
  4. Completion of extensive research project.
  5. Oral presentation of research findings.
  6. Satisfactory performance on 5-6 examinations.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Principles of Language is a study of the nature of language including its systems, role in society, historical and social changes, the development of writing systems, first and second language acquisition process, the biological foundations of language, and artificial or machine languages.

Course Content

Students review the nature of language (origins, human and animal), the systems of language (morphology, syntax, semantics, phonology), sociology and linguistics (dialects, genderlect, the evolution of language families and of language, the role of slang and jargon), the development of writing systems around the world, psychology and linguistics (how people acquire a first, second, third, etc. language), animal "language", the brain's role in processing language, and the development of synthetic languages (e.g. computerized language, audix or voice mail messages).

Nature of Course

Emphasis is placed upon the general themes of language, its role in society and its psychological bases rather than on the specific discussion of any one language. Comparisons across languages, dialects, and societies are made. The role of language in the student's discipline is explored. Cooperative Learning groups in which students actively apply the content of the readings and the lectures to solve problems forms the basis of the presentation of material. Assigned readings and lectures are designed to highlight areas of discussion. Oral presentations followed by questions and answers is required.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all readings, to participate actively in their assigned groups, and to write brief reports on topics and problems covered. The mid-term exam involves the analysis of a piece of writing related to the student's discipline. An oral presentation and a final paper on a topic of the student's choice which integrates the topics of the course is required.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A course in rhetorical criticism, exploring how rhetorical theories help us process and appreciate the substance of speeches and the effectiveness of speakers.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to the major research and principles of rhetorical theory and rhetorical criticism. The class will cover the nature of criticism and constituents of the Rhetorical Act. Also historical leaders of social change will be focused on to demonstrate instances of both the principles of rhetorical theory and rhetorical criticism.

Nature of Course

This class will most notably integrate subject matter and approaches from areas catalogued under “Perspective on Individual Expression” and “Perspective on Human Institutions.” Material relating to Oral Expression and Written expression will assist the analysis of message elements – elements such as structure, coherence, development, oral style, and language devices. Material relating to Development of a Major Civilization, Political Systems, and Social Systems will inform the analysis of contextual element and the understanding of speaker and audience(s), as well as suggest the impact of a message. In other words, students will have to understand how past events as well as contemporary events impact a speaker’s rhetorical “mission” and choices, as well as to understand what impact the speaker seems to have had and on what bases.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned material, participate in class discussions and activities, and perform satisfactorily on examinations and quizzes. Also they will complete assigned papers and presentations satisfactorily, including locating and gathering quality research materials upon which they base their analyses of particular instances of public discourse. Students will gather materials that illuminate the historical setting/ context as well as scholarly materials that assist their analysis of rhetorical elements.

Prerequisites

Junior standing.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of the social and legal issues that have influenced public K – 12 education.

Course Content

The course involves a study of social and legal issues influencing public education. Topics such as religion and prayer in public schools, the controversy surrounding evolution and intelligent design in science classes, Pledge of Allegiance and moment of silence laws, home schooling, bullying, surveillance cameras and other emerging technology in classrooms and hallways, discrimination, student and educator rights, and school safety will be discussed from a social, historical, and legal perspective.

Nature of Course

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Student Expectations

  1. Locate, read and critique assigned texts, legal opinions, and articles as measured by an oral presentation of a legal brief selected by the student.
  2. Critically analyze and synthesize information, demonstrate the ability to identify the legal, ethical, and social values involved in complex dilemma, and provide rational and defensible solutions as measured by responding in writing and orally to dilemma scenarios.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to integrate legal, ethical, historical, and social issues with an understanding of their responsibilities as adults in society as measured by a 10-page term paper.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to seek to understand the perspective of others as measured by a self-reflection on their growth in perspective after completing the course.
  5. Attend class regularly, participate in class discussions, and submit assignments in a timely manner.

Prerequisites

Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of African Americans from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement.

Course Content

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Nature of Course

This course will integrate subject matter and approaches from Perspectives on Human Institution s in the areas of Development of a Major Civilization and Social Systems by having students examine the African American community and its development from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement and how African American interacted with and changed the major political and social systems of this country. This course will also integrate material from Perspective on Individual Expression by examining the ways in which artistic and literary expressions have been instrumental in helping African Americans endure and overcome oppression and discrimination. This interdisciplinary approach will allow students to develop an enhanced understanding of the oppression directed towards African American in this country, the ongoing struggle for equality and civil rights, and the important role of the arts and individual expression in sustaining community and fostering change in American society. By integrating knowledge from these various perspectives, student will develop an understanding of the interdependency of peoples and cultures in society.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Participation in class discussion.
  3. Reading all materials assigned.
  4. Timely completion of all written and oral assignments, including a research paper.
  5. Demonstration of mastery of course content in three critical analysis papers.
  6. Graduate students have an additional requirement to complete two book reviews.
  7. Demonstration of computer skills in word processing and location of information.
  8. Students must abide by the university’s policies regarding academic honesty as outlined in the student handbook. Penalties for academic dishonesty range from failing the assignment and/or failing the course to expulsion from the University.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Catalog Description

A study of the American Civil Rights Movement from the 1950's to the present.

Course Content

This course examines African Americans' continuing struggle for civil rights in America. Concentrating on the period extending from the desegregation battles of the 1950's and 60's to the battles over affirmative action of the present day, this course will look at the issues and events which define the movement, examine the role of both leaders and followers in pushing the movement forward, and explore the role of music and the arts as a tool to resist oppression. Students will assess the achievements gained in the movement to date, and ascertain the status of the Civil Rights Movement at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The course will also place the African American struggle for civil rights in its larger context by examining the 19th and early 20th century antecedents of the struggle, as well as some of the subsequent movements for obtaining equality for minority groups in America, including women, Native Americans, Latinos, Gays and Lesbians, and the Disabled.

Nature of Course

The format of the course will be lecture and discussion. Students will read extensively, discuss the implications of their readings in class, take several essay exams, and complete a research paper.

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to locate, read and critique all assigned cases and materials and to actively participate in all assignments (General Education Objectives 1, 2 & 9).
  2. Students will be required to analyze and synthesize information, demonstrate the ability to identify the legal, ethical and social values involved in complex issues related to capital punishment and demonstrate the ability to participate in online Forums on assigned topics (General Education Objectives 2, 3, 7 & 9).
  3. Students will be required to demonstrate the ability to seek to understand the perspectives of others as measured by their ability to write position papers on assigned death penalty topics (General Education Objectives 2, 3, 6, 7 & 9).
  4. Students will be required to analyze and synthesize information, demonstrate the ability to identify the legal, ethical and social values by engaging in research and reflection in the writing of a paper (1500 words) discussing the appropriateness of the death penalty as a form of punishment in contemporary American society (General Education Objectives 1, 2, 3, 7 & 9.

Prerequisites

Development of a Major Civilization; Social Systems; Artistic Expression.

Corequisites

Junior or Senior standing

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2207
generaleducation@semo.edu
Academic Hall 132

General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 3400
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701