Southeast Missouri State University

Mission Statement for the Campus Violence Prevention Program

The Campus Violence Prevention Program raises awareness and promotes the primary prevention of interpersonal violence to create a safe campus environment. The Campus Violence Prevention Program Education and Outreach Coordinator plans and coordinates programs (i.e. trainings, workshops) to educate students, faculty, and staff on the realities of violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The Education and Outreach Coordinator participates in a variety of directed activities to provide direct support to students who experience sexual assault and interpersonal violence. The program informs students and employees of their rights regarding reporting instances of violence and ensures access to counseling, victim advocacy, legal assistance, and supportive services available on campus and in the community. The program serves a vital role in promoting bystander intervention and educating the campus to prevent interpersonal violence.

Relationship Violence, or Domestic Violence, includes any number of behaviors used by one person to control another in a current or former relationship.

Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse, Psychological Abuse, Social Isolation, and Economic Deprivation are all included in the term Domestic Violence. Any one or combination of these is never okay, and is against the law.

Physical Abuse is any actual or threatened physical attacks, even when these physical attacks are not directed at the person, but instead at a wall or breaking a possession. It may often begin by "playful" pinching or pushing, but often escalates to shoving, burning, and striking.

Sexual Abuse is any forced or coerced sexual act. Just because someone is in a relationship, does not make them obligated to any sexual behavior. Also, often, after a bout of violence, the abuser feels guilt or remorse and wants to "make love" to put things right. Out of fear of further violence, a survivor may give in.

Psychological Abuse
is attacks on the targets self-esteem and self-worth. This often takes the form of name-calling, manipulation, or intimidation. Often after a survivor's self-worth has been broken down, he/she may feel responsible for further abuse. Many people believe that as long as a person isn't being hit, that it isn't that bad. The effects of psychological abuse, however, often last much longer than those of physical abuse.

Social Isolation occurs through manipulation, by playing on a person's sympathies, by intimidation, or by forbidding a person to go out or to see friends and family. The effect is further control, as the person loses resources available to them.

Economic Deprivation occurs either by theft, by destruction of property, or by clinging to traditional values of one person being "the bread winner." Again, the effect is that the survivor has fewer resources and is further under the control of the abuser.

Domestic Violence tends to follow a predictable cycle.

Cycle of Violence

During the apology period, an abuser may seem incredibly remorseful and even sweet to the person being abused. This explains, in part, why a person stays within these abusive relationships.

Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence includes any number of behaviors used by one person to control another in a current or former relationship.

Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse, Psychological Abuse, Social Isolation, and Economic Deprivation are all included in the term Domestic Violence. Any one or a combination of these is never okay, and is against the law.

Physical Abuse is any actual or threatened physical attacks, even when these physical attacks are not directed at the person, but instead at a wall or breaking a possession. It may often begin by "playful" pinching or pushing, but often escalates to shoving, burning, and striking.

Sexual Abuse is any forced or coerced sexual act. Just because someone is in a relationship, does not make them obligated to any sexual behavior. Also, often, after a bout of violence, the abuser feels guilt or remorse and wants to "make love" to put things right. Out of fear of further violence, a survivor may give in.

Psychological Abuse
is attacks on the targets self-esteem and self-worth. This often takes the form of name-calling, manipulation, or intimidation. Often after a survivor's self-worth has been broken down, he/she may feel responsible for further abuse. Many people believe that as long as a person isn't being hit, that it isn't that bad. The effects of psychological abuse, however, often last much longer than those of physical abuse.

Social Isolation occurs through manipulation, by playing on a person's sympathies, by intimidation, or by forbidding a person to go out or to see friends and family. The effect is further control, as the person loses resources available to them.

Economic Deprivation occurs either by theft, by destruction of property, or by clinging to traditional values of one person being "the bread winner." Again, the effect is that the survivor has fewer resources and is further under the control of the abuser.

Domestic Violence tends to follow a predictable cycle.

Cycle of Violence

During the apology period, an abuser may seem incredibly remorseful and even sweet to the person being abused. This explains, in part, why a person stays within these abusive relationships.

Overview

Sexual Assault is a term to describe any sexual act without consent. Missouri Law divides these acts into separate offenses, ranging from Forcible Rape to 3rd Degree Sexual Misconduct.

Sexual Assault does not happen due to uncontrollable lust or simple miscommunication, though these acts are often written off as such. Sexual Assaults are acts of aggression for which there is no excuse. No matter how a person is dressed, or behaves, no one asks or deserves to be assaulted.

Laws

Below are listed the Missouri Legal definitions of the various crimes that are often referred to as Sexual Assault.

Forcible Rape: A person commits the crime of forcible rape if such person has sexual intercourse with another person by the use of forcible compulsion. Forcible compulsion includes the use of a substance administered without a victim's knowledge or consent which renders the victim physically or mentally impaired so as to be incapable of making an informed consent to sexual intercourse.

Sexual Assault: A person commits the crime of sexual assault if he has sexual intercourse with another person knowing that he does so without that person’s consent.

Forcible Sodomy: A person commits the crime of forcible sodomy if such person has deviate sexual intercourse with another person by the use of forcible compulsion. Forcible compulsion includes the use of a substance administered without a victim's knowledge or consent which renders the victim physically or mentally impaired so as to be incapable of making an informed consent to sexual intercourse.

Deviate Sexual Assault: A person commits the crime of deviate sexual assault if he has deviate sexual intercourse with another person knowing that he does so without that person's consent.

First Degree Sexual Misconduct: A person commits the crime of sexual misconduct in the first degree if such person purposely subjects another person to sexual contact without that person's consent.

Second Degree Sexual Misconduct: A person commits the crime of sexual misconduct in the second degree if such person:

  1. Exposes his or her genitals under circumstances in which he or she knows that his or her conduct is likely to cause affront or alarm;
  2. Has sexual contact in the presence of a third person or persons under circumstances in which he or she knows that such conduct is likely to cause affront or alarm; or
  3. Has sexual intercourse or deviate sexual intercourse in a public place in the presence of a third person.

Third Degree Sexual Misconduct: A person commits the crime of sexual misconduct in the third degree if he solicits or requests another person to engage in sexual conduct under circumstances in which he knows that his requests or solicitation is likely to cause affront or alarm.

Sexual Abuse: A person commits the crime of sexual abuse if he subjects another person to sexual contact by the use of forcible compulsion.

Consent: Consent or lack of consent may be expressed or implied. Assent does not constitute consent if:

  • It is given by a person who lacks the mental capacity to authorize the conduct charged to constitute the offense and such mental incapacity is manifest or known to the actor;
  • It is given by a person who by reason of youth, mental disease or defect, or intoxication, is manifestly unable or known by the actor to be unable to make a reasonable judgment as to the nature or harmfulness of the conduct charged to constitute the offense; or
  • It is induced by force, duress, or deception.

(Taken from the University of Central Missouri's Lighthouse webpage)

For information on SEMO policy concerning Sexual Assault, go Here

Common reactions to Sexual Assault:

There is no right or wrong reaction to a Sexual Assault. Here are some reactions that may be expected:

Emotions

  • Shock
  • Numbness
  • Loss of control
  • Disorientation
  • Helplessness
  • Sense of vulnerability
  • Fear
  • Self-blame/guilt for "allowing" the crime to happen
  • Feeling that these reactions are a sign of weakness

Behavior

  • Crying
  • Yelling
  • Shaking
  • Calmness: Seemingly Unaffected
  • Withdrawing from Social Settings
  • Sexual Promiscuity
  • Self-Medication with Alcohol or drugs
  • Lack of Concentration or Energy
  • Change in Eating
  • Nightmares/ Flashbacks

Again, it is important to know that a person may experience any or multiple of these. There is no right or wrong way to feel, but know that there are people here to help.

Stalking

Stalking is any willful and repeated action that would cause a reasonable person to feel harassed, frightened, or intimidated. While many people believe that stalkers are harmless, and best if left alone, stalking is a very serious crime that can, and often does, escalate to physical violence and/or sexual assault.

Stalking can take many forms. Here is a list of common means of contact used by stalkers:

  • Telephone
  • Wait outside/inside residence
  • Watch from afar
  • Follow
  • Send letters
  • E-Mail
  • Show up uninvited
  • Send gifts

The majority of stalkers use multiple of means of contact.

You'll notice that often one single incidence of these alone would not raise alarm with most people. But when they are repeated and the effect is that the target is made afraid or intimidated, they take on a much more sinister appearance and constitute a violation of a person's privacy and sense of well-being, as well as breaking the law.

Stalking Flow

(Courtesy Steve Thompson, Central Michigan University Sexual Aggression Services Coordinator)

There are a number of places that you can report an incident of dating or domestic violence, sexual assault,and/or stalking, whether the incident occurred on or off campus. The Campus Violence Prevention Program partners with both on-campus and off-campus locations that allow reporting. There is also a third party reporting option available to those who wish to report on someone else's behalf.

Click on one of the links below to find specific information for the following reporting locations:

On Campus:

Department of Public Safety
Office of Student Conduct
Counseling & Disability Services
Residence Life
3rd Party Report

Local Community:

Safe House for Women, Inc.
Cape Police Department
Beacon Health Center:http://www.beaconhealthcenter.com/

The Office of Residence Life provides convenient and affordable on-campus housing to all students, upholds judicial issues such as university and/or housing violations, and maintains clean and secure facilities. Residence Life employs Residence Assistants for most floors of every residence hall as well as professional Hall Directors for all the residence halls. Residence Life staff members take proactive safety measures by educating first-time and returning students on safety issues. In addition, they provide continuing awareness programs throughout the school year.

Victim(s) of stalking, domestic violence, and sexual assault can report to any student or professional staff members of Residence Life. Members of Residence Life will ask the victim basic information related to the incident. After assessing the information, the Residence Life members will give available options to the victim and refer him/her to appropriate services, such as university police, counseling services, medical treatment, etc. Residence Life advocates for the student, meaning they will not “push” the victim to pursue any other options if the victim does not want further actions taken. The victim’s information will only be shared with appropriate personnel within Residence Life (hall directors and the Director of Residence Life). The only outside sources that would be notified of the student’s name would be university police and/or counseling services so they could assist the victim. If it is determined that a victim participated in other university or housing violations at the time of the incident, a report would be forwarded to the Office of Student Conduct for a review before any disciplinary actions would be taken. Residence Life members have provided several “beyond the scope of duty” services (including anything from sitting at the hospital with the victim to contacting whomever the victim would like to know about the issue). If the alleged perpetrator is found not in violation of university policies and/or criminal laws, and the victim is still apprehensive about the alleged perpetrator, Residence Life will move either the victim or the alleged perpetrator to another space on campus so the victim feels the safest. Upon resolution of the incident, Residence Life staff will informally check on the victim as often as requested.

If the victim wants further assistance, Residence Life staff would direct the victim to other resources. These resources include: Department of Public Safety, Campus Violence Prevention Program, Counseling and Disability Services, Beacon Health Center, Safe House for Women, and local hospitals.

For more information please visit the Residence Life website

Contact Residence Life:

Location: Towers Complex
Phone Number: (573) 651-2274 (campus x2274)
General Office Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
E-Mail:residencelife@semo.edu

Resources

Violence Prevention Coordinator
(573) 986-6899

Counseling and Disability Services
(573) 986-6191
http://www.semo.edu/ucs/

Safe House for Women
Crisis Hotline: 1-800-341-1830 or (573) 651-1614
www.semosafehouse.org

Beacon Health Center
(573) 332-1900
http://www.beaconhealthcenter.com/

Department of Public Safety - Southeast Missouri State University
(573) 651-2215

Cape Girardeau Police Department
(573) 335-6621

Rape Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN)
1-800-656-HOPE (4673)
www.rainn.org

US Department of Justice Office of Violence against Women
www.usdoj.gov/ovw/

(For SEMO faculty and staff) Third Party Report Form

If Someone You Know Has Been Hurt

Believe. Often the number one factor in a survivor's recovery is whether or not they are believed. Add to this fact that statistically only 2-8% of sexual assault reports are false reports, and there is little reason not to believe a person when they tell you that they have been sexually assaulted.

Safety. There could still be danger, especially if the assault just happened. Make sure he/she is in a safe place by offering to stay with them, or by offering for them to stay with you. There may also be medical needs that need to be addressed. Even if a survivor doesn't feel hurt, there may be internal injuries that she doesn't know about. Offer to go to a hospital, but it is very important that he/she isn't forced to go. It is still the survivor's decision.

Choices. Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, and Stalking are all about power and control. For the survivor, control has been taken away and often needs to be restored. Offering small choices (i.e. talk at your place or my place; Pepsi or Coke) and supporting these decisions can do an incredible amount to build back confidence for the survivor. This can help to make the bigger decisions (i.e. filing a police report; going to the hospital; pressing charges). Whether you agree with these decisions or not, it's important to support the survivor and not to push the survivor into anything they don't want to do.

Listen. Listen more and talk less. It's important to follow the lead of the survivor as information unfolds. Often we may get curious, or want to know details about what happened or how, but avoid asking questions. Let the survivor tell you what they're ready to. Also be mindful of physical space. It's often best to sit on the same level and not to loom over them. As well as following their lead with talking, follow their lead with touching as well. Some really want a hug, and others may not want to be touched at all. It's best to ask before touching and respect the fact that even a close friend might not want to be touched.

Revenge. It is very common to feel angry that someone we know and love has been hurt. The anger is justified. What is not justified, however, is bringing more violence into the situation. Seeking revenge doesn't help the survivor; it only helps our own selfish need for violence. Further, it may put the survivor in more danger of further retaliation and at great risk of losing a system of support, as the person they just told will most likely be in jail.

Limitations. Particularly with those feelings of anger, it is important to take care of our own needs. Recovery is a long process that often needs professional assistance. Counselors are trained to help walk a person down that road: many of us are not. It is important that the person knows that they have a friend, but also that there are others available and trained to help. You may also benefit from talking to a counselor. Being a friend in this situation takes a lot of emotional energy, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with taking care of yourself and making sure that you're well equipped to help your loved one further.
(Adapted from John Faubert's "The Men's Program")

Below is information for those who have experienced Sexual Assault/Rape; Dating/Domestic Violence; or Stalking; and for friends and loved ones of these survivors. There is no “one size fits all” action plan. Experiences differ, and whatever you decide is best for you, is the right thing for you to do. These are some things to consider, and options that have been found helpful. We are here to help you through the process. You do not have to do it alone.

Sexual Assault/Rape

Safety:
Assess the safety of where you are. Do you feel safe? Is there a chance he/she may return? Is there anyone you could call for support? Is there a safer place that you can think of? (ex: Friend's room, Neighbor's home, Safe House for Women, Inc., etc)

Medical Care:
Beacon Health Center or the hospital can help with treating injuries, pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) assessment, possible prevention if it has been within 72 hours, and evidence collection. An evidence exam is often described like a gynecological visit. This procedure may go on your insurance if you have it, but Beacon Health Center may be able to help if this is not an option.

Support:
A relative, friend, counselor, or advocate from either the Safe House for Women or Beacon Health Center can accompany you through this.

Legal Options:
A police report may be filed. This would be through the Department of Public Safety (DPS) if it happened on campus or through Cape Girardeau Police Department if it happened off campus. Do not be afraid to ask questions before you report the incident or throughout. You may consult with the police officers about pressing charges and continuing forward with a criminal suit.

If the assailant is a student at SEMO, sanctions can be placed upon him/her through the Office of Student Conduct. Adjudication is based on a preponderance of evidence, rather than reasonable doubt. Sanctions may also provide specific needs of the victim such as removing the accused student from a class, residence hall, or the campus. The Southeast Missouri State University Sexual Assault Policy may be found here


A civil suit may also be filed. Survivors of sexual assault have successfully sued for emotional distress, hospital fees, etc. Legal representation will need to be found and consulted.

Any option or combination of these legal options may be pursued by you. Again, it is important to know that whatever you decide, you don't have to do it alone.

 Dating/Domestic Violence

Take special care if you are planning on leaving or ending a relationship. Violence often gets worse when a person shows signs of trying to leave, as the abuser may feel that he/she is losing control.

Call the police:
If you can get to a phone, call the police. If you can't get to a phone, try to arrange a signal with a neighbor that the police need to be called. Ask that your partner be arrested. If it is too frightening to attempt this in front of your partner, you can ask to speak with an officer privately.

Get support from family and friends:
Do not try to protect the abuser. Tell them what has happened. The process can be long and hard, and it can be made much more doable with the support of loved ones.

Move out – Move away:
It is unfair to have to leave your home because of something that someone else has done. At the same time, it is often the best way to stay safe. The Safe House can help with relocating.

Safety Plan:
Here is a form from the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence that will help to generate a safety plan.

Stalking

If you are in immediate danger, dial 911.

Trust your instincts:
Do not downplay your feelings or the danger of the situation. If you feel threatened or in danger, you probably are.

Take threats seriously:
Danger is generally higher if and when the stalker threatens death or suicide, and when the victim attempts to leavea relationship.

Do not communicate with the stalker or respond when the stalker attempts to communicate with you.

Keep evidence:
Or, log the incidents of contact. Keep notes, emails, and phone messages. For example, if the stalker is waiting outside of work on Monday, and then later that night and left a message:

Mon, 4/2, 8:00pm: Waited outside of work for me.
Mon, 4/2, 9:35pm: Telephoned and left message on machine.

(Elements taken from National Center for Victims of Crime: Stalking Resource Center pamphlet.)

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