Perspectives on Human InstitutionsPolitical Systems

Catalog Description

Institutions and processes of national and state government, including an analysis of the United States and Missouri Constitutions.

Course Content

A study of the design and underlying principles of the American political system, including the United States Constitution and Missouri Constitution, the separated powers arrangement of three branches of government, and the major linkage institutions (political parties, interest groups, mass media, and organized political movements).

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: The class will involve a textbook as well as an issues or policy book which debates the pros and cons of contemporary political issues.
  2. Group Projects: May be assigned by the instructor.
  3. Emphasis on Writing: Significant; the class will include essay exams as well as writing exercises which promote critical thinking.
  4. Out-of-Class Projects: A library assignment in conjunction with a course paper.
  5. Teaching Format: Primarily lecture, question and answer.
  6. Other: Students will be expected to make a 5-10 minute oral presentation.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class.
  2. Take notes.
  3. Participate in class discussion.
  4. Complete examinations and other class assignments.
  5. Demonstrate computer conversancy.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsPolitical Systems

Catalog Description

The institutions, cultures and practices of democratic and nondemocratic governments, including the United States, and an analysis of the Missouri Constitution.

Course Content

A study of the U. S. political systems in a comparative setting. The course will focus on the Constitutions and governing documents of major countries around the world. Furthermore, the course will address the decision-making institutions of the nations, including the legislative, executive, and judicial bodies. In addition, the class will focus on the Constitution of Missouri.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: The class will involve a textbook as well as a supplemental theoretic reader to highlight central political issues.
  2. Group Projects: May be assigned by the instructor.
  3. Emphasis on Writing: Significant; the class will include essay exams as well as writing exercises which promote critical thinking.
  4. Out-of-Class Projects: A library assignment in conjunction with a course paper.
  5. Teaching Format: Primarily lecture, question and answer.
  6. Other: Students will be expected to make some oral presentation.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class.
  2. Take notes.
  3. Participate in class discussion.
  4. Successful completion of essay exams.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2783
univstudies@semo.edu
Memorial Hall 210
General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 4180
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701