Catalog Description

Acquisition and appreciation of the cultures of Chinese speaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading and writing Chinese. (General Education Course.)

Course Content

Nature of Course

Student Expectations

Prerequisites

Corequisites

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of French-speaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French.

Course Content

Students learn to pronounce French words and to use basic vocabulary and structures. Structures include present tense of regular and common irregular verbs, negative and interrogative structures, articles, and prepositions. Students will learn basic French vocabulary needed to function in a French speaking environment.

Students will compare structures in French and English, such as subject-verb agreements, word order, notions of gender, formal and informal address, etc. They will be called upon to use critical thinking and analytical skills.

Cultural content is an important part of the course. Students will learn basic geography and become familiar with features of daily life: food, shopping, university life, cultural life, etc. They will engage in guided out-of-class activities, including library projects and attendance at French films. Cultural awareness and interrelationships are discussed.

Nature of Course

This course combines an introduction to the study of the French language with a study of some major aspects of French culture.

Emphasis is on the use of French in oral communication situations, e.g., asking questions, describing daily activities, food, weather, numbers, time expressions, etc. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, films, and reports on cultural figures.

Student Expectations

The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over French vocabulary and structures. Students will be expected to write brief reports in English on cultural topics or on French films.

Grades for the course are based on performance on two exams and a final exam, three short papers, one oral presentation, and participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of the culture of French-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French.

Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Language Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course continues the study of French language and culture. Emphasis is placed on developing increased proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French.

Students learn the structures of the language, as well as the cultural context of the language, through practice of oral communication situations. Structures introduced at this level include narration in the past and future, the use of descriptive adjectives and adverbs, and the use of prepositions. Students will be expected to master the use of these and other structures. In addition, students will compare structures of English and French in order to understand the functioning of language.

The cultural content of the course will be integrated with the oral communication activities. Students will master certain cultural skills and knowledge through the appropriate use of the language in context.

Nature of Course

This is a participation course in which students increase their oral communication abilities in French and become acquainted with the cultural context of the French-speaking peoples. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, and reports on French films.

Student Expectations

Students will participate in individual and group projects both in and outside of class, using materials in the textbook and resources available on campus. The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over French vocabulary, structures, and culture. Students are also expected to write brief reports on cultural topics. Grades are based on a composite of students' oral and written performance as well as their demonstration of cultural knowledge and understanding.

Prerequisites

FR-100 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of French language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in French (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course builds on students' previous knowledge of French to develop proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Major aspects of French culture and contemporary French life are included in the material presented.

The course consists of regular assignments from the textbook for recitation in class, as well as written homework and oral presentations in French. Also included are readings from outside sources and listening comprehension activities in the language laboratory.

Nature of Course

The class emphasizes an active approach to learning. Student involvement and participation in class is essential. In addition to material assigned for class preparation, individual or group culture projects may be assigned.

Student Expectations

There are frequent quizzes and exams in class, as well as written and oral assignments and projects. Grades are based on a composite of students' written and oral performance and a demonstration of their knowledge and understanding of French culture. Students also write reports on French films.

Prerequisites

FR-120 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of German-speaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German.

Course Content

Students learn to pronounce German words and to use basic vocabulary and structures. Structures include present tense of regular and common irregular verbs, negative and interrogative structures, articles, and prepositions. Students will learn basic German vocabulary needed to function in a German speaking environment.

Students will compare structures in German and English, such as subject-verb agreements, word order, notions of gender, formal and informal address, etc. They will be called upon to use critical thinking and analytical skills.

Cultural content is an important part of the course. Students will learn basic geography and become familiar with features of daily life: food, shopping, university life, cultural life, etc. They will engage in guided out-of-class activities, including library projects and attendance at German films. Cultural awareness and interrelationships are discussed.

Nature of Course

This course combines an introduction to the study of the German language with a study of some major aspects of German culture.

Emphasis is on the use of German in oral communication situations, e.g., asking questions, describing daily activities, food, weather, numbers, time expressions, etc. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, films, and reports on cultural figures.

Student Expectations

The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over German vocabulary and structures. Students will be expected to write brief reports in English on cultural topics or on German films.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of the German-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German.

Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit Policy.

Course Content

This course continues the study of German language and culture. Emphasis is placed on developing increased proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German.

Students learn the structures of the language, as well as the cultural context of the language, through practice of oral communication situations. In addition, students will compare structures of English and German in order to understand the functioning of language.

The cultural content of the course will be integrated with the oral communication activities. Students will master certain cultural skills and knowledge through the appropriate use of language in context.

Nature of Course

This is a participation course in which students increase their oral communication abilities in German and become acquainted with the cultural context of the German-speaking peoples. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, and reports on German films.

Student Expectations

Students will participate in individual and group projects both in and outside of class, using materials in the textbook and resources available on campus. The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over German vocabulary, structures and culture. Students are also expected to write brief reports on cultural topics. Grades are based on a composite of students' oral and written performance as well as their demonstration of cultural knowledge and understanding.

Prerequisites

GN-100 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of German language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in German (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course builds on students' previous knowledge of German to develop proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Major aspects of German culture and contemporary German life are included in the material presented.

The course consists of regular assignments from the textbook for recitation in class, as well as written homework and oral presentations in German. Also included are readings from outside sources and listening comprehension activities in the language laboratory.

Nature of Course

The class emphasizes an active approach to learning. Student involvement and participation in class is essential. In addition to material assigned for class preparation, individual or group culture projects may be assigned.

Student Expectations

There are frequent quizzes and exams in class, as well as written and oral assignments and projects. Grades are based on a composite of students' written and oral performance and a demonstration of their knowledge and understanding of German culture. Students will also write reports on German films.

Prerequisites

GN-120 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

The development of proficiency in oral communication through the study of rhetorical theories, principles, and strategies.

Course Content

Because there are few professions for which effective communication skill is not important, this course is potentially valuable to any student, regardless of major.

The course is designed to acquaint students with the basic principles of effective oral communication and, more importantly, to give students first-hand experience in sharpening their communication abilities. The goal of the course is to teach students to make intelligent rhetorical choices.

Course content includes the types and functions of public speaking, classical rhetorical theory, delivery and nonverbal communication, style, organization, use of evidence and reasoning, strategies of persuasion, informative speaking, visual aids, the role of speaker credibility, and motivational appeals.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: The primary source of reading assignments is the textbook, but students are also expected to do outside reading in connection with a semester project (see below) and in researching their classroom presentations.
  2. Group Projects: Team or group projects may be assigned. For example, the argumentative speech is frequently done with a partner as a debate.
  3. Emphasis on Writing: Students are required to submit complete outlines of the speeches they present. In addition, students will submit a brief rhetorical analysis of a significant instance of public discourse.
  4. Out-of-class Projects: Students are expected to prepare their presentations and papers outside of class. Classroom time is devoted to treatment of communication principles and to presentation and discussion of students’ speeches.
  5. Teaching Format: A variety of teaching formats, including lecture, in-class exercises, and group discussion are utilized. The primary teaching format involves student presentations.
  6. Other: The department believes that effective communication skills are crucial for personal and professional success and that they can be learned by anyone, regardless of previous experience or natural ability. By the same token, the department does not believe that skill in communication is merely a knack or a talent. Rather, its development must be based on sound theory and principles. While instructors strive to create a non-threatening classroom atmosphere, hard work and concerted study are required to develop effective communication abilities. The department rates the course as "moderately difficult."

Student Expectations

  1. Classroom Presentations: Typically, over the course of the semester students are required to present 3-4 speeches including:
    1. Speech of introduction. 2-3 minutes
    2. Expository speech (to inform on a significant subject within the General Education categories of either Natural Systems or Human Institutions). 5-8 minutes
    3. Argumentative (debate) speech (may be done with a partner) on a question of judgment. 5-8 minutes
    4. Persuasive speech (advocating a policy or solution to a problem). 7-10 minutes
  2. Examinations: Typically, two exams, a mid-term and a final, usually of the objective type, are given.
  3. Papers: A rhetorical analysis of a significant speech or other form of rhetoric from American or world history is required.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

A course that adapts principles of effective public speaking to the online environment and evaluates students' application of those principles.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to the basic theory and principles of speech preparation and presentation in face to face and online settings. The course will increase students’ understanding of the communication process and the ethics involved while enhancing their appreciation of public discourse and how it shapes and is shaped by events, especially in a democracy.

Students will improve the ability to think critically about messages they encounter as well as those that they produce. Students’ will improve the ability to gather and evaluate information as they contemplate issues of public controversy, and to use that information responsibly in their own discourse, while improving listening/feedback skills. Also students will develop greater critical skill in the selecting, developing, and communicating of meaningful ideas.

Nature of Course

This class will most notably integrate subject matter and approaches from areas catalogued under “Perspective on Individual Expression” and “Perspective on Human Institutions.” Material relating to Oral Expression and Written expression will assist the production and language devices. Material relating to Development of a Major Civilization, Political Systems, and Social Systems will inform a speaker’s understanding of audience(s) and how to adapt a message.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned material, participate in online discussions, and perform satisfactorily on unit tests. Also they will complete assigned papers and presentations satisfactorily, including locating and gathering quality research materials upon which they formulate and develop ideas, properly citing all sources.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Consideration of the elementary principles involved in effective person to person communication.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to various principles and theories of communication and how they apply to the interpersonal context--that is, in communication between two persons, in terms of speaking and listening as well as relational development and wellbeing. In addition, contextual factors, such as culture/environment, will be examined in terms of their implications for communication and relationships. Students will learn what contributes to one's effectiveness as a communication partner, including challenging situations such as disagreement and conflict.

Nature of Course

The course emphasizes "active" learning strategies wherein students learn through experiential activities rather than through straight lecture/readings. For example, students will reflect upon how they would communicate in various hypothetical situations. In addition, students will complete various nationally-normed instruments to help illuminate their communicative tendencies--especially in terms of what could be considered effective and ineffective practices. Quizzes, tests, and papers will require knowledge and application of the various concepts discussed in readings and in classroom discussion.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to 1) complete all assigned reading material; 2) participate in all class discussions, exercises, and activities; 3) perform satisfactorily on examinations and quizzes; 4) complete all assigned papers and presentations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish.

Course Content

Students learn to pronounce Spanish words and to use basic vocabulary and structures. Structures include present tense of regular and common irregular verbs, negative and interrogative structures, articles, and prepositions. Students will learn basic Spanish vocabulary needed to function in a Spanish speaking environment.

Students will compare structures in Spanish and English, such as subject-verb agreements, word order, notions of gender, formal and informal address, etc. They will be called upon to use critical thinking and analytical skills.

Cultural content is an important part of the course. Students will learn basic geography and become familiar with features of daily life: food, shopping, university life, cultural life, etc. They will engage in guided out-of-class activities, including library projects and supplementary reading in English. Cultural awareness and interrelationships are discussed.

Nature of Course

This course combines an introduction to the study of the Spanish language with a study of some major aspects of Spanish culture.

Emphasis is on the use of Spanish in oral communication situations, e.g., asking questions, describing daily activities, food, weather, numbers, time expressions, etc. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, and reports on Spanish films.

Student Expectations

The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over Spanish vocabulary and structures. Students will be expected to write brief reports in English on cultural topics.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish.

Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Language Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course continues the study of Spanish language and culture. Emphasis is placed on developing increased proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish.

Students learn the structures of the language, as well as the cultural context of the language, through practice of oral communication situations. Structures introduced at this level include narration in the past, the use of descriptive adjectives, and the subjunctive. Students will be expected to master the use of these and other structures. The cultural content of the course will be integrated with the oral communication activities. Students will master certain cultural skills and knowledge through the appropriate use of the language in context.

Nature of Course

This is a participation course in which students increase their oral communication abilities in Spanish and become acquainted with the cultural context of the Spanish-speaking peoples. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice and reports on Spanish films. The class is conducted mainly in Spanish.

Student Expectations

Students will participate in individual and group projects both in and outside of class, using materials in the textbook and resources available on campus. The course includes quizzes and exams over Spanish vocabulary, structures, and culture. Students are also expected to write brief reports on cultural topics or films. Grades are based on a composite of students' oral and written performance as well as their demonstration of cultural knowledge and understanding.

Prerequisites

SN-100 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of Spanish language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in Spanish (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course builds on students' previous knowledge of Spanish to develop proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Major aspects of Hispanic culture and contemporary Hispanic life are included in the material presented.

The course consists of regular assignments from the textbook for recitation in class, as well as written homework and oral presentations in Spanish. Also included are readings from outside sources and listening comprehension activities in the language laboratory.

Nature of Course

The class emphasizes an active approach to learning. Student involvement and participation in class is essential. In addition to material assigned for class preparation, individual or group culture projects may be assigned.

Student Expectations

There are frequent quizzes and exams in class, as well as written and oral assignments and projects. Grades are based on a composite of students' written and oral performance and a demonstration of their knowledge and understanding of Hispanic culture. Students will also write reports on Spanish films.

Prerequisites

SN-120 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

This course emphasizes the development of competence in interpersonal communication through the study of verbal communication principles and strategies, helping strategies, and the influence of gender and culture on communication.

Course Content

Basic concepts, principles, and skills of interpersonal communication are studied with a particular focus on how the skills can be used in helping others. Both intellectual understanding and practical application of communication and helping skills are emphasized. Topics covered include cultural and gender-based influences on communication, perception, self-perception, empathy, language strategies, body language, listening skills, effects of emotion on communication, relationships, conflict, and family communication. Through study of these topics and practice with the skills involved, students will have opportunities to become more aware of issues in interpersonal communication and helping. They will also have opportunities to assess and enhance their own communication skills and effectiveness.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to develop an understanding of the principles of communication and the skills needed to be an effective communicator. It will include lecture, readings in the text, class discussion, communication skill practice in class and skill-based homework outside of class. Assignments will include two abstracts of communication articles and a term paper on a communication or helping skills related topic. During the class period, there will be frequent communication group meetings to discuss a topic or practice a skill. Outside of class, students will try out their skills and write reports on their progress. Students will also view film segments in class to analyze communication strategies and skills.

Student Expectations

Regular class attendance is of particular importance due to the communication groups and the skills training that are an integral part of the course. Students are also expected to read assigned materials, complete assignments on time, participate in class discussion and communication groups, and take all examinations. Because of the interactive nature of the course, it is also expected that students will strive to interact with one another in ways that foster the ability to learn and the comfort level of everyone in the class.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2207
generaleducation@semo.edu
Academic Hall 132

General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 3400
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701