400/500 Level Senior Seminar

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of the ethical questions that arise in the context of doing business in modern society.

Course Content

This course involves a detailed study of the ethical problems that arise in business, along with methods and techniques for analyzing and evaluating proposed solutions. The course is divided into four sections. The first is an overview of ethical concepts and theories, and of the importance and role of ethics in business. Distinctions are drawn between the legal and ethical dimensions of business, and between consequentialist and non-consequentialist theories in ethics.

The second section examines the concept of responsibility, with emphasis on the view that discussions of responsibility make sense only within the context of well defined social roles. Different kinds of social roles are examined, as is the claim that the activity of business is itself a social role. Two different types of social responsibility often ascribed to business, beneficence and non-malevolence, are examined.

The third section examines problems of honesty and deception in business. The wrongness of deception itself is examined, along with specific problems involving deception in accounting, finance, management and marketing. Problems surrounding employee rights, privacy and whistleblowing are also examined.

The fourth section examines problems of economic and social justice. Theories of distributive justice and the role of business in achieving it are presented, along with broader questions of social justice and affirmative action.

Nature of Course

The course is discussion oriented rather than traditional lecture, and students will be expected to do a good deal of reading in preparation for class. Much of the reading material is analytical and argumentative, and students will be called on to analyze and discuss the reading material in class. The course requires a significant amount of writing, involving the preparation of case studies and a written research project. At least six hours of study time per week, apart from class time, should be devoted to this course. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, participate in class discussion, and participate in a group debate on a question of ethics and business policy. Students are also expected to analyze at least five case studies involving ethical issues in business and complete a 10-15 page interdisciplinary research project. Students will demonstrate achievement on all examinations.

Prerequisites

Senior standing and completion of all lower division General Education courses, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Study of American regional landscapes including house types, barns, and other folk structures.

Course Content

The purpose of this course is to develop a greater awareness by students of the cultural landscapes of America. The course will examine the processes by which the architectural forms and settlement systems began to be developed in the colonial period. The discussion will be organized by regions such as New England and the South. Discussion of later evolution of American housing and structures will be based on such architectural styles as the Victorian Italianate or Queen Anne. The course will end with contemporary house types.

Nature of Course

There is an emphasis on reading in this course. Reading assignments will be based on articles in the library as well as in the textbook. A major project in the course is an analysis of a rural or urban area's cultural landscape. One feature of the project will be an oral presentation to the class, using illustrations. Lectures and discussion about relevant topics will be used.

Student Expectations

Examinations will be worth approximately 75-80 percent of the grade. The exams will be composed of objective questions such as multiple choice answers, and short essays or paragraph questions. Class projects will be used to determine the remaining percentage. The class project will require student access to a camera to be used for landscape interpretation. Photographs and slides will be used by the student for a presentation.

Prerequisites

Completion of courses in the General Education categories: Development of a Major Civilization, Social Systems, and Artistic Expression.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study and comparison of the music, instruments, style, and the music-making process of diverse world cultures.

Course Content

Music in World Cultures is an investigation of the art and artifacts of music and music-making as they have developed and been implemented in various cultures. Using the tools of the ethnomusicologist, students will consider the social, religious, political, and aesthetic influences on music in a number of cultures. While some basic content will be considered for each musical culture studied, this course is not a survey.

Music in World Cultures uses the interdisciplinary tools of ethnomusicologists who approach their subjects--music and music-making--through musicology, cultural anthropology, iconography, organology, linguistics, and history. Ethnomusicology is the study of musical behaviors and its students investigate a myriad of factors, including aesthetic philosophy, cultural technologies, and the historical evolution of musical styles.

Nature of Course

The semester will be broken roughly into three segments: Materials and Methodologies, Musical Cultures and Experiences, and Final Research Presentations. This is not a survey of world musics, but an ethnomusicology seminar using musics of specific cultures as study subjects. Each semester, two or three musical cultures outside of the mainstream Western European fine art tradition will be considered. The investigation of each culture will include reading and listening assignments as well as in-class listening, videos, and lectures. The class will function as a seminar, with specific topics covered over the course of several weeks.

In the first two sections of the semester, classes include lectures, listening analysis, and video presentations. Students will write short (up to 4 pages) response or reaction papers every two or three weeks. These papers will be presented for discussion in seminar sessions.

Two tests will be given. These tests are essays and will be based on readings, listenings, lectures, and discussions. They will allow the student to demonstrate his/her control of the subject matter as well as his/her critical thinking and writing skills.

As this is a capstone course, especially for music majors, the final research project and presentation are major components of the semester's work. The thrust of the semester is to equip the student with the tools to do musicological/cultural research and to hone his/her critical and writing skills. The final project should demonstrate the students' ability to apply these research critical and writing skills to a specific topic.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend all classes.
  2. Participate in classes by contributing to discussions with observations, questions, and responses that are germane to the subject at hand.
  3. Complete all reading and listening assignments prior to class.
  4. Complete all writing assignments, including response papers and classroom presentations, on time.
  5. Complete a major research project according to guidelines issued for the project.
  6. Make an oral presentation summarizing and describing the results of the Final Research/Field Work Project.
  7. Pass two exams.

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing (completion of 60 credits or more); completion of 100, 200, and 300 level General Education courses; ability to read music; or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

The study of national and international trends in manufacturing and production through the application of research and development techniques.

Course Content

Research in an international (global) manufacturing and production environment is a concept which cannot be ignored in the highly technological society of today. Activities in major manufacturing countries, and some in the Third World nations, demand investigation by students with the intent of comparative analysis with that of the United States. Manufacturing Research in a Global Society is a course that places students in actual manufacturing and production facilities where they, working in teams, have an opportunity to conduct research and develop solutions to "real world" problems. Students will also be taught the fundamentals of working with "high performance work teams," including the function, organization, and optimization with emphasis on listening and influencing skills.

Nature of Course

The course is communication skill development intensive. Students will conduct research activities in a variety of areas. Several industries have been contacted and have agreed to allow students to conduct research activities within their manufacturing plants. The students will then develop both a written and oral presentation of materials developed during the research process.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Complete written research report.
  3. Present research activities to the proper representatives.
  4. Prepare and present a brief class presentation on research activities.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education Core Curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

This course focuses on the full spectrum of the American health care system. This includes the current health care concerns of diverse populations and legal/ethical issues.

Course Content

This is a study of current concerns of the health and well-being of populations. Consumer concerns, bioethical issues, and healthcare access are addressed. Attention is given to the integration of previous knowledge into a broad understanding of health care in America.

Because the American health care system is very complex, various external and internal influences will be examined in depth. This includes ethical and legal issues, diverse perspectives of health care utilization, costs of health care, and the latest research and technology as related to health care.

This course is intended to address questions from a broad perspective with utilization of current events, historical studies, and primary references.

Nature of Course

This course is both reading and participative intensive. Students will be expected to do a great deal of diverse reading, and develop a reading list for other students in the course. Students will complete abstracts related to the readings on a weekly basis, and direct a seminar topic. Class sessions will primarily be directed discussions.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend and participate in seminar activities.
  2. Lead a seminar on one assigned topic in written and oral form.
  3. Prepare a reading reference for other students regarding their health care systems topic.
  4. Complete weekly abstracts of materials/readings researched on different health care systems topics.
  5. Satisfactorily complete all exams.
  6. Complete a formal paper on an assigned topic.

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and completion of 100, 200 and 300 level General Education courses, or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An integration of scientific and religious knowledge through reading and discussion related to epistemology, origins, and process.

Course Content

Do you put scientific knowledge and religious knowledge in two isolated "boxes" in your mind? What would happen if you took them out and carefully considered the ways they relate to each other? Can you accept the findings of modern science (the Big Bang, biological evolution, the laws of thermodynamics, quantum theory, etc.) and still be a faithful member of your religious tradition? Is there another religious tradition, a new set of beliefs, or another way of understanding your own tradition that might allow you to integrate everything that you think to be true?

If you're ready to give questions like these serious, carefully reasoned consideration, and to share your ideas and reasoning with others in an open but intellectually rigorous setting, then this course is for you. If you think that "there are some things we're just not meant to know," or "it's best not to think too much about your religious beliefs," or you just don't want to talk about your own beliefs (or disbelief), then another UI course may suit you better. The class covers these three main topics:

Epistemology: How do you know what you know?
Origins: How did we get here? Why is there something rather than nothing?
Process: How do events occur? Is there genuine chance in the world, or are events predetermined? Do we have free will, or are we controlled by a deity or our brain chemistry?

Nature of Course

The course is organized as a series of learning cycles. For each of the major topics, each student first writes a brief paper (2 pages) outlining his or her present ideas. Before each class session, each student reads a chapter from the text or an assigned paper by another author and writes a short summary of its main points. In class we discuss the day's reading in groups. At the end of each unit, students write longer papers (~5 pages) explaining their ideas on the topic again, showing how their ideas are supported by other authors, defending them against counter-arguments, and describing how and why their ideas have changed or remained the same during the unit.

Student Expectations

Students must read assigned material, locate additional pertinent sources, write summaries of assigned readings, participate actively in class discussions, and write three short and three longer papers. Students with any sort of religious belief, or none, can be successful in this course; however, each student must consider his or her own views critically, and consider the views of others supportively.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education curriculum or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Examination of major developments contributing to our understanding of the solar system and their impact on the future of mankind.

Course Content

This course documents and explains how our knowledge of the solar system has progressed rapidly from myth, mystery and misconceptions to dramatic scientific understanding. It focuses on the advancements made in planetary exploration, from the advent of the telescope to recent space probes and human missions. It also addresses the impact of these advancements upon society and considers its future as the potential for mankind to leave its home planet and pioneer the solar system becomes more real.

The course is divided into three major themes centered on telescopic views and interpretations, the use of planetary probes and humans in space, and future activities planned for solar system exploration and their significance to human development. Subject matter from the natural environment is integrated with that from literary, artistic, and human institution perspectives.

Nature of Course

To inform students about the major developments in solar system exploration, use is made of a variety of historical and current materials ranging from early scientific and popular publications, charts, and drawings to recent maps, photographs, and the vivid images obtained from spacecraft missions to the planets. These materials serve to exemplify the role that physio-psychological factors play in the transformation of an observed image viewed in a telescope to its representation as an illustration. The difficulties that arise due to such factors led to much mis-interpretation of early scientific data, and this persisted for several centuries until the advent of more recent observing equipment and techniques. Oral discussion activities and a written course paper will enable students to examine and analyze these and other particular aspects of planetary exploration or its ramifications upon historical, contemporary, and future society.

Student Expectations

Students should attend all class meetings and must participate in classroom activities, such as a debate or panel discussion. Completion of a course paper on a chosen topic related to planetary exploration, along with oral presentation of the findings, is also required and is worth 25% of the total grade. Finally, satisfactory performance on three examinations featuring objective and essay questions is expected and these comprise the remaining percentage of the course requirements.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education core curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An examination of the origin and development of modern European thought and culture.

Course Content

This course investigates the main currents of European scientific, philosophic, religious, political, social, and economic thought from the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century to the present. In addition, it examines modern European thought through its art, music, and literature. Each of these ways of seeing the world and the human condition is studied in its historical context.

The European Mind concentrates on the connections between historical forces and modern ideas and intellectual systems. It examines the efforts of intellectuals who lived in the modern era of European history to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate ideas regarding the nature of humanity, society, and the world. This course presents exemplars of critical thinking in science, religion, philosophy, political and social theory, as well as art, music, and literature. It also provides explanations about how the ideas developed by modern Europeans have influenced life and society in the United States.

Nature of Course

The primary instructional methods employed in this course are lecture, large and small group discussions. Lectures provide the historical background of the life and ideas of European intellectuals. In some cases, they also serve as a means of philosophical analysis of the ideas under study. Large and small group discussions deal with readings about the intellectuals and excerpts from their works. They require students to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate the ideas of those intellectuals. Students will regularly write brief commentaries on the reading assignments in class and share them with their classmates in discussion groups. In addition, they will have opportunities to compare ideas on a particular issue from different periods, including the present. In order to engage in the study of the history of ideas, one must think critically. Thus, the very nature of this course entails critical thinking, analyzing, and reasoning.

The major project for this course is a biographical essay. Students will participate in a guided bibliographical research activity in which they will learn to use the tools of gathering biographical information. Following their decision to study a particular intellectual, they will examine biographies about that person, studies of the period in which the intellectual lived, studies of the intellectual’s work, and samples of that work. Students will then write a biographical essay in which they attempt to connect the life and times of the intellectual to his or her ideas. This task will require students to use the historical method of research and interpretation and the method of interpretation relevant to the field of the intellectual’s work. Following completion of the biographical essay, students will share the results of their research with their classmates in a brief oral presentation.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to complete reading assignments for each class session and participate in discussions of those readings. They also will be expected to perform satisfactorily on two essay examinations, to research and write a biographical essay, and to make an oral presentation on the results of their research.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and completion of Artistic or Literary Expression, Physical or Living Systems, Social or Political Systems, and Development of a Major Civilization.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Critical study of the reasoning used in the discovery and justification of scientific theories.

Course Content

  1. Introduction
  2. The Nature of Theories
    1. Models, Hypotheses and Laws
    2. Explanation and Prediction
    3. Realism and Empiricism
  3. Discovering Theories
    1. Discovery and Justification
    2. Heuristics
  4. Justifying Theories
    1. Inductivism
    2. Deductivism
    3. Naturalism
  5. Case Studies
    1. Celestial Mechanics - Ancient and Modern
    2. Newton's Synthesis
    3. Mendelian Genetics
    4. Mendeleer and the Periodic Table

Nature of Course

The aim of this course is to introduce students to a range of fundamental issues in the philosophy of science. The central question around which these issues revolve is 'How does science work?’ In exploring the various answers which have been given to this question, extensive reference will be made to episodes drawn from the history of science (detailed knowledge of the fields concerned will not, however, be presupposed). Class sessions will be oriented towards informed discussion of a variety of original readings, many of which will be set as homework assignments. The research project will be based on material not all of which is directly covered in the course and will therefore involve a certain amount of independent research in Kent Library. At least six hours of study time per week, apart from actual class time, should be devoted to this course.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussions.
  2. Complete all homework and reading assignments.
  3. Complete one long research project.
  4. Complete one mid-term essay exam and one final essay exam.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education Core Curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

The study of the exchange of symbols or messages that to a significant extent have been shaped by or have consequences for the functioning of political systems, i.e., an examination of the relationship between communication processes and political processes.

Course Content

Over two thousand years ago, Aristotle underscored the fact that politics and communication are inseparable parts of human nature when he observed (in his Politics) that human beings are political animals and pointed out (in his Rhetoric) that human beings alone possess the capacity for speech. In democratic cultures like our own, the relationship between these two essential aspects of human nature has never been more symbiotic. Especially with the advent and growth of the mass media, politics and communication have become intertwined. Thus, today to fully comprehend how power is wielded in democratic societies requires more than an understanding of political institutions and their operation, but also a thorough understanding of the process of using symbols to influence others, i.e., rhetoric. In this course, by focusing on political campaigns both past and current, students will have the opportunity to actively explore the connection between politics and communication through units of study that deal with political communication technology, political advertising, political debates, and political speechmaking.

Nature of Course

This course emphasizes active learning strategies wherein students learn through experience and discussion rather than through straight lecture. For example, students will analyze political debates, political speeches, and formulate and evaluate campaign strategies. A high percentage of course material will involve videotape and other non-print sources.

Student Expectations

In addition to regular classroom attendance, participation in classroom discussion, keeping up with reading, and taking a mid-term and final examination, each student will be expected to complete the following assignments: write and possibly produce a political commercial, participate in a mock presidential debate, ghostwrite a political campaign speech, keep a journal chronicling a national, state, or local campaign, prepare a 12-15 page term paper on a campaign from history. Students may be asked to participate in other activities and field trips as opportunities arise.

Prerequisites

Oral Expression (SC-105) and Political Systems (PS-103 or PS-104), or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Principles, techniques and theories used to influence the behavior of others through oral communication, with special emphasis on the analytical tools necessary to evaluate persuasive appeals more responsibly.

Course Content

  1. Perspectives on the Study of Persuasion
  2. Advocacy and Language: Symbol Manipulation
  3. Social Bases of Persuasion: Identification and Audience Analysis
  4. Persuasion and Reasoning
  5. The Psychology of Persuasion: Attitudes, Beliefs and Values
  6. Power, Credibility and Authority
  7. Persuasion Contexts and Arenas
    1. Advertising
    2. Politics
    3. Public and Mass Communication
    4. Interpersonal Persuasion
  8. The Construction and Presentation of Persuasive Messages
  9. Evaluating Persuasive Messages/Campaigns

Nature of Course

Investigative goals of the course include: the nature and importance of persuasion in human decision making, the theories and concepts of persuasion which relate to successful influence, the methods of the rhetorical process of selection, analysis, presentation and evaluation of persuasive appeals.

Performance goals of the course include: the criticism and analysis of rhetorical examples which reflect successful versus unsuccessful persuasion, the discovery, analysis and presentation of potential influence appeals through assigned campaigns, and the development and enhancement of skills necessary to make reasoned, reflective and critical responses to persuasive appeals.

Student Expectations

  1. Complete two formal oral presentations:
    1. Midterm presentation: A rhetorical analysis of a promotional ad.
    2. Presentation of the final project (described in item 2 below).
  2. Complete a highly structured, extensive rhetorical analysis dealing with a persuasive campaign or movement.
  3. Complete a series of quizzes, short papers, and one comprehensive final exam.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and completion of the General Education core curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

This course provides theoretical investigation of and the opportunity for community service through volunteerism. Includes a 1 hour integrated lab.

Course Content

The course emphasizes learning through service by incorporating experiential learning through volunteerism. Emphasis is placed on the contributions of volunteerism in meeting essential needs of people and improving the quality of life in communities. The course content explores theories that promote the idea that human beings are interconnected, interrelated, mutually interdependent, and become involved in reciprocal interactions and exchanges in the process of living. Emphasis is placed on essential preparations for successful volunteering and a 32 hour volunteer service requirement is used as a springboard to deepen understanding of human need and the power of one individual or groups of individuals in meeting those needs.

Nature of Course

This course is primarily taught as a seminar. It is interdisciplinary in nature using theories from several disciplines to promote understanding of the human experience. The course is designed to encourage students to make a difference in their communities by identifying needs and providing service. The required volunteerism is intended to provide the stimulus for reflection and deeper understanding of the needs of people in communities as well as the difference that volunteering can make in the life of the volunteer and those being served.

Student Expectations

This course conforms to the rigor of UI 400 and 500 level courses. There is extensive reading and discussion. Much of the discussion and sharing connected to this course occurs in the online environment. Students are expected to use the online bulletin board to respond and interact reflectively to assigned readings. Students are expected to be introspect and reflect on the course content and their volunteer experience. In addition to a cumulative exam, there is a scholarly research paper that explores the relationship of their chosen volunteer setting to the larger picture of human needs, programming to meet needs, and community well being. Students are required to make a scholarly presentation of their research and writing to their classmates. The reflective journal and written assignments as well as written and verbal responses to videos allow students to explore their values, ethics, and attitudes.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Comprehensive study of the ethical, social, scientific, and cultural problems associated with the use and abuse of natural resources.

Course Content

Everyone recognizes the human need to live in the environment, and to use it to survive. The problem, however, is understanding the right way to use natural resources. Should resources be overconsumed, or do we have a moral obligation to conserve and to recycle? Do we envision the world as an inert collection of material resources here for human dominion? Is it a sacred, indeed a living, place which should be used only with careful reverence? Are there other alternatives? Do we as human beings have a responsibility to the rest of nature, if not for its own sake, then for future generations? Environmental Ethics is one of the hottest new topics in philosophy today. It casts its nets widely, analyzing the ethical, socio-economic, political, scientific, and cultural problems associated with the use and abuse of natural resources. The course is divided into the following units:

  • Unit I: Primer in Ethical Theory (An introduction to traditional approaches to human ethics)
  • Unit II: Primer in Environmental Ethics (an introduction to the differences between environmental and human ethics)
  • Unit III: The Science of Ecology and the Ethics of Interconnection (An analysis of the extent of interconnection between the science of the environment and an ethics of the environment)
  • Unit IV: Readings in Environmental Ethics (An in depth study of the leading theories in environmental ethics)
  • Unit V: New Frontiers in Environmental Ethics (An analysis of eco-feminism, Gaia theory, "green" politics and other new concepts in environmental ethics)

Nature of Course

The solutions of environmental problems are, by their very nature, interdisciplinary. As a result, this course will reflect that very definition. Students will be expected to both read and actively engage the course material. By this, the student will be involved in many in class activities, from hands-on demonstrations to discussions and debates. One fully understands the ethical dimension of environmental problems when their complexities are encountered first hand. A simple "readings and lecture' format discourages such encounters. Thus, the course will be active, and as "hands-on" as possible. Through a combination of free-flowing interdisciplinary discussion, and hands-on demonstration and computer simulations, we will attempt to understand the rich diversity of the environment and the ethical role of humans within it.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend class regularly.
  2. To be prepared to participate in class discussions based on sets of discussion questions.
  3. To be prepared to hand in critical journals on a semi-weekly basis.
  4. To read the assigned texts and articles, and be prepared to participate in class discussions and demonstrations regarding them.
  5. To complete preliminary independent research culminating in a proposal for a final position paper.
  6. To present a summary of the term paper for class round table discussion.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education courses in Logical Systems, and either Physical or Living Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of the interaction of historical, economic, and political influences upon the biological and psychosocial nature of individuals aging into the twenty-first century.

Course Content

This course will provide students with a historical and cultural background for understanding why aging is conceptualized as it is and how one's social, psychological, and biological aging is profoundly affected by political and economic forces that are tied to the history and culture of a society. The focus will be to show how these systems are interrelated by understanding how past and present political, social, and economic forces interact with the nature of public programs and policies, the functioning of various institutions (e.g., medicine, government) and are ultimately reflected in the attitudes and behaviors of aging individuals and their families. One of the major emphases of this course will be the development of students' ability to critically examine the multidimensional forces affecting the everyday life of all aging individuals.

Nature of Course

This course is designed to be a seminar in which students, both individually and in small groups, discuss their analyses of the interconnections among areas that determine the nature of aging. A significant amount of reading of research materials relating to biological, psychological, social, economic, and public policy issues will be required. Students will be required to participate in and lead discussion of the materials and relate their understanding of the application of these materials. A major research project as well as small writing assignments and quizzes will be required.

Student Expectations

  • Attendance and participation in all course-related activities.
  • Effective involvement in group research activity.
  • Satisfactory performance on quizzes over readings.
  • Seminar leadership on an assigned topic.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education requirements in the following categories: Natural Systems and Human Institutions.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary study of 9 plays by Shakespeare as they relate to contemporary issues and events.

Course Content

Shakespeare's characters and his themes are timeless. Hamlet, and Brutus, and King Lear, and Macbeth still exist and may be found anywhere from Wall Street to Main Street. Shakespeare's plays provoke timely questions: What rights and responsibilities does one generation have in its relationships to other generations? What is the effect of racial prejudice? Does power corrupt? Does civilization save us or destroy us? How can modern man find harmony in an imperfect world? This class is designed to encourage students to find their own answers to these and many other questions.

The course requires close reading of the assigned plays and some use of critical material. It also requires that students be moderately well informed on current events that are newsworthy.

Nature of Course

This is a course based on discussion and performance, with students participating in both. Guest lecturers from other disciplines will present some plays from their own perspectives. For example, one lecture on Hamlet might be presented by a psychologist. Or an instructor from music might present Verdi's opera Otello as the class studies Shakespeare's Othello. Films or excerpts from films will be shown or made available to students.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Research paper or creative project.
  3. Close reading of material.
  4. One examination for each play, both objective and essay, with the lowest grade to be dropped.
  5. Active participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

Completion of any course in the Literary Expression category.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary study of five history plays and four comedies by Shakespeare. The plays will often be studied in the light of contemporary issues and events.

Course Content

The five history plays will cover the period of the War of the Roses, from the abdication of Richard II, through the Lancaster and York kings, ending with the arrival of the Tudors. For the remainder of the semester, the class will cover The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Much Ado About Nothing.

The course requires close reading of the plays and some use of critical material. It also requires that students be moderately well informed on current events that are newsworthy. Historical background will be provided as part of the course.

Nature of Course

This is a course based on discussion and performance, with students participating in both. Students are encouraged to relate the plays to their own lives and to contemporary events. Films or excerpts from films will be shown often.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Research paper or creative project.
  3. Close reading of material.
  4. One examination of each play, both objective and essay, with the lowest grade to be dropped.
  5. Active participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

Completion of any course in the Literary Expression category.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A critical investigation into the aesthetic difference, function, significance, and value of the movement disciplines of dance and sport.

Course Content

This course includes: a developing understanding of the definition, history, inter-relationship and distinction of the terms aesthetics, dance, and sport; an ability to locate, organize, and examine information on those three topics; written and oral critical thinking skills in examining sociological perspectives of aesthetics of movement, artistry vs. athleticism, the role of creativity, and movement as a cathartic experience; and developing the ability to construct a defensible personal philosophy towards the aesthetics of movement.

Nature of Course

The Aesthetics of Movement integrates subject matter in the category of Artistic Expression (Perspectives on Individual Expression) with the category of Social Systems (Perspectives on Human Institutions). Through dance and other movement forms such as athletics, consideration of the aesthetic component of expression can enhance students' perceptions, analyses, interpretation, and judgments of their own and society's perspectives. Readings in philosophy, aesthetics, poetry, literature, and criticism inform the student's understanding of dance and sport. As manifestations of oral traditions, dance and sport require kinesthetic and intellectual knowledge of a specialized kind, involving respective vocabularies, rules of conduct, and feats of coordination which are handed down by choreographers and coaches alike through an elaborate verbal/physical communication system. Facility in both dance and sport has often been characterized as the apprehension of unique oral and physicalized "languages," or forms of communication (Cohen, 1984; Sheets-Johnstone, 1983). Experiential learning involving different dance styles and sports from a variety of social systems around the world will provide students with the comparative skills necessary to appreciate, understand, and intelligently discuss the rich diversity and complexity of cultural attitudes and identity inherent to these movement forms. It will be demonstrated that dance and sport both serve as manifestations of humankind's need and desire for meaningful expression.

Student Expectations

Attend class regularly with an active, engaged, and informed attitude. Demonstrate a sophisticated, critical thinking capacity while satisfactorily completing all reading, writing, discussion, and active learning movement assignments. Demonstrate an interdisciplinary analytical research ability in the generation, investigation, and elaboration of questions, issues, and projects.

Prerequisites

45 credit hours.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

The literary and sociological study of the role, both positive and negative, sport plays in American society.

Course Content

Readings and discussions in this interdisciplinary class focus on the various ways that sport interrelates with specific subject matter areas such as literature, sociology, philosophy, history, economics, and psychology. Topics will be examined in terms of functionalist and conflict theories of sport. Functionalists argue that sports create and sustain feelings of good will and solidarity among members of a community or nation. Conflict theorists believe that sports, like other social orders, are based on exploitation and coercion, particularly with regard to gender, race, ethnicity, and social class. These contrasting views will be traced in representative essays, stories, novels, poems, plays, and movies. Sample topics include; Roles of Athletes, Coaches, and Spectators; Sport as a Social Institution; Sport, Race, and Gender; the Business of Sport; Sport and Politics; Sport as Metaphor and Myth; and Sport and Aesthetics.

Nature of Course

This course, which involves a considerable amount of reading, writing, and discussion, challenges students to examine sports seriously and critically from the perspectives of opposing viewpoints--some positive, some negative. Interdisciplinary in nature, the course will require students to integrate the study of sports with other interests or disciplines.

Student Expectations

  1. Class participation, including completion of all homework and reading assignments (20% of total grade).
  2. Completion of an interdisciplinary research project (30%).
  3. Three additional short written/oral presentations, one of which will be a book review (30%).
  4. Midterm and Final exams (20%).

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of agricultural issues and public policy using knowledge and methods from agriculture and social ethics.

Course Content

The first third of this course will examine the principles and applications of four ethical systems. The remainder of the course will use these to approach case studies concerning the environmental issues of agriculture, food safety issues, foreign food aid and trade, the treatment of animals, the preservation of family farms, biotechnology, agricultural sustainability, and other issues. Throughout the semester a single issue of concern in Southeast Missouri agricultural systems will be studied through readings, guest lectures, field trips, discussions, and by other means.

Nature of Course

The objectives of this course are (1) to help students learn how to use principles and methods from social ethics and information from agriculture to understand agricultural issues and the various values-based perspectives people have about these issues; (2) to help students learn how to gather information and learn about complex agricultural issues; and to help students make informed value decisions about critical agricultural issues and public policy.

Class time will be used primarily for discussion, guest lectures, field trips, and other activities; lectures will be rare.

Student Expectations

Preparation for and participation in class discussions (10% of grade), seven quizzes (25%), one take-home examination (25%), and one paper (40%).

Prerequisites

Senior standing.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An emphasis on mathematical ideas as a growing, changing human endeavor, which influences the history of societies including today’s technological culture.

Course Content

Mathematics transcends time, geography, society, culture and religion. The contributions to mathematics come from all eras, cultures, and religions. Mathematics is a universal language, and mathematical thinking is a part of human activity. The universality of mathematics is emphasized. The knowledge of mathematics today is the sum total of creative efforts of many mathematicians from many centuries. The course offers a road map for a student's journey through their thought processes. It is a journey over the mathematical highways of examples, conjecture, generalizations, and proofs. It offers glimpses into the lives of great men and women mathematicians. The course treats the nature of modern mathematics and the impact of technology on the learning and teaching of mathematics as well as the mathematical contributions of ancient mathematics.

The course examines development of mathematical ideas over the past 5000 years. It covers mathematical thought in all countries and all cultures and explores forces that hindered or helped this development such as geographic location, commercial growth, social isolation, political persecution, and religious bias.

Nature of Course

The essential student requirement is the desire to learn how mathematics came about, how mathematicians lived and worked, and how the different areas of mathematics development. Students will do writing assignments as well as class presentations. A research paper is a required part of the course so library work will be needed. Discussions and problem solving are important activities of the course.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and actively participate in class discussions.
  2. Solve assigned problems and turn in solutions and other class assignments.
  3. Write a course paper.
  4. Make at least two oral presentations.
  5. Take at least two tests and the final exam.

Prerequisites

Development of a Major Civilization General Education course and MA-139 or MA-140.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A critical analysis and examination of some of the fundamental political philosophical questions, normative concepts and ethical problems of the Holocaust.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the intellectual, cultural, philosophical, political and historical origins and development of the Holocaust. Extensive analysis of several major philosophical political, intellectual historical, literary and autobiographical works that have made a contribution in providing deep insights and raising significant questions on the Holocaust. In particular, analysis of key normative concepts and issues that stimulated such writers: anti-Semitism, intentionalism v. functionalism (i.e., the origins of the Holocaust), the "uniqueness" of the Holocaust, the political ideology of Nazism, Jewish resistance, the articulation of experiences of the Holocaust, the problems of memory and representation, theological and religious consequences of the Holocaust, the ethical issue of choices, Nazi propaganda, the plight of victims, and the roles and motivations of bystanders and perpetrators. This particular course will analyze political philosophical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems).

Nature of Course

This course consists of a conceptual analysis of the most significant political philosophical, moral, and intellectual historical ideas, issues and themes of the Holocaust. Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in conjunction with the political theories of the Holocaust. Students will be encouraged and required to participate in an active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to respond orally to such questions in the following session. Consistent oral participation is not only a particular requirement of each individual student, but a necessity for the intellectual progress and understanding of the Holocaust for the entire class.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and orally respond to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a Holocaust political philosophical issue of normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (15-20 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various theories and interpretations of the Holocaust are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able to evaluate critically scholarly research in the study of the Holocaust.

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and completion of General Education Core Curriculum, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Individualized study of and experience with the effective and appropriate design, execution, and reporting of chemical investigations.

Course Content

"Professional Experience in Chemistry" explores four important ways that chemists communicate with one another as professionals: written reports, oral presentations, personal conversations at professional meetings, and published chemical literature. These modes of communication are studied and practiced as the student investigates a problem of the student's choice in basic or applied chemistry. Working with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and defend a proposal for a project intended to make progress toward the problem's solution. To increase the likelihood that the student's professional interactions will indeed result in one or more problems solved, the course seeks to bring the student more fully into the scientists' culture through application of the scientific method and sound principles of experimental design, including consideration of safety and environmental issues, as well as moral and ethical concerns. Application of these concepts to an investigative experience will enhance the proposal's credibility and improve the possibility of the investigation's success.

Nature of Course

The course emphasizes problem solving and communications skills applied to an investigative project. Each student will develop and practice skills and knowledge needed to access the chemical literature. The nature of scientific truth will be discussed, and case studies will be used to explore environmental and safety issues, as well as moral and ethical questions in science. The application of presentation software, such as Microsoft PowerPoint, to scientific presentations will be explored through computer lab exercises.

Student Expectations

Each student will

  1. Attend class meetings.
  2. Complete reading assignments to facilitate student participation in class discussion.
  3. Participate in class discussion and collaborative activities.
  4. Select a Mentor for the Experiential Learning (EL) Project from the Chemistry Department faculty.
  5. Prepare an Abstract for an EL Project.
  6. Prepare a written Proposal for an EL Project.
  7. Orally defend the Proposal before the Chemistry Department's EL Committee.
  8. Attend a professional meeting jointly selected by the student and the Mentor.

Prerequisites

CH-180, CH-181, or CH-185.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Critically examine the social, cultural, familial, and political factors that influence human sexuality and expression.

Course Content

Students in this course will examine sexuality through an interdisciplinary approach. Sexuality will be critically discussed, analyzed, and researched from a variety of disciplines consisting of: biology, anatomy, human development, cultural studies, history, politics, criminal justice, and philosophy. Students will think about sexuality analytically and develop a sociological understanding of the complexities of sexuality in interpersonal relationships and society.

Nature of Course

This course draws from the disciplines of human development, sociology, biology, physiology, anatomy, history, political science, family studies, criminal justice, and cultural studies. The main objective of this course is to integrate knowledge and gain a broader understanding of sexuality not only in our personal lives but also in our children’s lives and as a society as a whole. These objectives will be obtained by critically examining human sexuality from various perspectives. This course fits under the perspectives of Natural Systems and Human Institutions. Course topics will relate to the categories of Behavioral Systems, Living Systems, Development of Major Civilization Systems, Political Systems, and Social Systems.

Student Expectations

The students will show progress in meeting course objectives by:

  1. Students will read all assigned materials and complete all assignments in a timely, professional manner.
  2. Students will attend class regularly and participate in class discussions and group activities.
  3. Students will write several 1 – 2 page personal reflection papers on topics discussed in class. Students will orally present in class specific points from their reflection paper.
  4. Students will choose four interdisciplinary topics to research, analyze, and interpret. They will present their findings in written form and share with the class orally.
  5. Students will interview someone regarding their thoughts pertaining to a topic from class and summarize their findings in written form.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Group-based solution of open-ended problems based on cases or scenarios from the "real world," requiring interaction among students with diverse training. Prerequisites: Completion of the General Education Core Curriculum and senior standing in one of the disciplines specified for the particular section. Additional prerequisites may be required for particular sections.

Course Content

The course is intended to provide students with an experience simulating that of professionals in their major disciplines, whether in industry, business, or academic research. Each section proposal will be evaluated both for its requirement of rigorous application of scientific or mathematical skills and knowledge as well as the extent to which the project is interdisciplinary. Individual sections will have purposes and objectives specific to the content areas addressed and the nature of the particular problem. Every section, however, will address these common objectives:

  1. Oral communication:
    1. Students will use effective oral communication skills to communicate with group members.
    2. Students will make presentations appropriate to a lay audience regarding their progress and proposed solutions to problems.
    3. Students will orally present design alternatives or questions to a lay audience and solicit necessary input.
  2. Written communication:
    1. Students will compose written progress reports that are suitable to a lay audience.
    2. Students will use written memos to record progress, solicit information, and suggest approaches within their groups.
  3. Natural systems or Logical Systems, depending on section:
    1. Students will apply background knowledge from their major disciplines to identify issues pertinent to the problem.
    2. Students will apply content and methods from their major disciplines to propose possible solutions to the problem.
    3. Students will apply content and methods from their major disciplines to develop a solution for the problem.
    4. Students will devise experimental, modeling, application, or verification approaches and test the efficacy of proposed solutions.

Nature of Course

Students are presented with a real-world problem that requires a solution combining skills appropriate to one or more scientific or technical disciplines and possibly others such as business, the humanities, etc. Each section offered will have a specific theme and integrate specific disciplines, which will vary from section to section. Students then work in groups to solve the problem by applying the required skills.

Student Expectations

Each student will:

  1. Attend class meetings and group meetings.
  2. Complete assigned tasks within the group in a timely manner.
  3. Participate effectively in the preparation of written reports and presentations.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education Core Curriculum and senior standing in one of the disciplines specified for the particular section. Additional prerequisites may be required for particular sections.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A critical examination of variables impacting the development of literacy including perspectives from neuroscience, communication, education, and social science.

Course Content

This course focuses on the development of literacy from various professional perspectives. The neuroscience perspective of literacy is examined through study of how the “brain learns to read.” The communication perspective of literacy is examined through study of the role of language and hearing in the reading process. The education perspective of literacy is gleaned from a critical review of theoretical approaches to regular and remedial reading instruction. Lastly, the social science perspective is derived from analysis of environmental, cultural, political, and behavioral variables that influence literacy development.

Nature of Course

This course incorporates a variety of instructional techniques to guide the student to a critical and reflective analysis of challenges pertaining to literacy development. An extensive review of works by David Sousa and Mel Levine, scholars in the areas of brain and learning, allows students to integrate perspectives on literacy development from neuroscience and education. Students locate, review, and summarize current periodical literature to discover the role of language and hearing in literacy development. To explore the educational perspective, students develop a presentation on an assigned reading instructional technique. Of particular importance to this presentation is a critical review of the technique in regard to the guiding principles of evidenced-based practice. The social science perspective is examined through student participation in forum discussions focusing on governmental roles in literacy promotion, behavioral issues in literacy development such as motivation, literacy environments in the home and community, and the cultural value of literacy.

This course includes subject matter encompassing a number of perspectives including living systems through the study of the neuroscience, linguistic, and auditory aspects of literacy as well as behavioral social systems through discussion of motivation, cultural value, and environment as they pertain to literacy development. In addition, students utilize skills of written and oral expression as they develop their knowledge and understanding of challenges to literacy development. At the conclusion of the course, students comprise a summative written paper that challenges them to integrate information from different perspectives in a description of multidisciplinary solutions to eliminate barriers to literacy development. This course is of particular interest to individuals involved in education, speech-language pathology, as well as social and cultural aspects of literacy.

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to attend/review course lectures and assigned readings.
  2. Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions.
  3. Students are expected to complete 3 tests and a final written essay examination.
  4. Students are expected to deliver a 10-15 minute class presentation.
  5. Students are expected to complete a 4-6 page research paper.

Prerequisites

Completion of 300-level General Education requirement.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Explores contemporary research on male issues in the field of men’s studies, including male development across the lifespan.

Course Content

The main objective of the course is to explore contemporary research on men and male development across the life-span. The course draws from disciplines of human development, sociology, psychology and biology. In studying the topic of male development, students explore theoretical perspectives as well as empirical works from different disciplines. A cross-cultural and historical perspective is considered by students reviewing men’s’ studies in the United States as well as other cultures.

Nature of Course

The interdisciplinary nature of this course is accomplished by examining empirical data and theoretical frameworks from various disciplines such as human development, psychology, sociology, and biology. As the extensive course outline indicates, the content allows students to study and integrate knowledge gained from professional works and theoretical viewpoints identified in these scientific fields. For example, the integration of information from these disciplines is emphasized by exploring biologically-based theoretical perspectives as well as humanistic and existential theories on male and gender development (Behavioral Systems). Also, cultural variations and ethnic issues about men and masculinity will be examined from psychosocial and political perspectives (Social Systems). A multidisciplinary perspective will be applied to discuss topics such as males’ physical and mental health, sexuality, career issues, and roles in family.

The interdisciplinary nature of the course is also emphasized through various assignments and projects. These projects will allow students to investigate theoretical constructs and contemporary research about male development. For example, to address the subtheme of “Integration of Knowledge: Living in an Interdependent Universe”, students are required to interpret data and exercise individual expressions by participating in class discussions, informal debates/oral presentation, group collaborative projects, writing research papers, and analysis of case study reports. Therefore, the courses content and assignments combine the perspectives from Social & Behavioral Systems, Human Institution, and Natural Systems.

In addition, the course content and assignments create a context to promote students’ skills in some of the major General Education Objectives including: “Locate & Gather Information”, “Critical Thinking”, “Understand & Relate to Human Experiences”, and “Various Cultures & Their Relationships”.

Student Expectations

  1. Class attendance and participation in class activities.
  2. Satisfactorily complete all assigned reading from professional journals and conduct oral presentations.
  3. Satisfactorily complete research paper.
  4. Successfully complete all exams.

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of any General Education courses in Behavioral or Social Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

This course explores the history of African Americans from 1619-1865.

Course Content

Beginning with an examination of the Transatlantic slave trade and the perils of the Middle Passage, this course will examine the creation of African-American culture in North America, the establishment of race-based slavery throughout the North American colonies, the realities of slave life in the antebellum South, the role of music in African-American slave culture, African-American resistance to slavery and oppression, and the experience of free blacks in both the North and South.

Nature of Course

Organized as a discussion seminar, this course examines the African-American community and its development, both slave and free, from the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in Virginia in 1619 through the general emancipation that occurred with passage of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865. This course will explore how African Americans interacted with and changed the major political and social systems of this country as well as the ways in which artistic and literary expressions have been instrumental in helping African Americans endure and overcome oppression and discrimination. By taking this interdisciplinary approach to the African-American experience during the period of institutionalized slavery in America, students will develop an enhanced understanding not only of the reality of the treatment African Americans received in this country and their ongoing struggle for freedom and equality, in itself a major development in our American civilization and an important change in our social system, but of the important role of music in sustaining community and fostering change in American society. By integrating knowledge from these various perspectives, students will develop an understanding of the interdependency of peoples and cultures in society.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Participation in class discussion.
  3. Reading all materials assigned.
  4. Timely completion of all written and oral assignments, including a research paper.
  5. Demonstration of mastery of course content in three critical analysis papers.
  6. Demonstration of computer skills in word processing and location of information.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

 &

Catalog Description

Critical analysis of the political, cultural, and psychological aspects of global terrorism and political violence both historically and currently

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the intellectual, cultural, philosophical, political and historical origins and development of global terrorism and political violence. Further, we will examine the psychological causes of terrorism along with the psychological impacts terrorism has on those who survive. Students will partake on an extensive analysis of several major political, philosophical, intellectual, historical, religious, and cultural works that have contributed to the deep insights and raising of significant questions related to global terrorism and political violence. In particular, we will examine key concepts and issues such as: defining terrorism, the cultural and historical origins of terrorism, the internationalization of terrorism, the development of terrorist groups (like al Qaeda), the cultural causes and impacts of global terrorism, the growth of suicide terrorism, the psychological causes and impacts of suicide terrorism, old media and new media coverage of terrorism, the psychological mindset of terrorists today, and the future of global terrorism.

Nature of Course

This particular course will analyze political concepts, normative principles, and issues from the interconnected perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and psychological theory (behavioral systems). These themes naturally present themselves within the literature as modern academic research has worked to critically examine global terrorism and political violence through these same frames. Consider the events of September 11th— a religiously motivated attack carried out by individuals unhappy with American capitalism and culture who hailed from regions where terrorism had spread for cultural and sociological reasons motivated by their own psychological tendencies to carry out suicide missions. Further, the course addresses the idea of living in an interdependent universe as much of our discussions focus on how the spread of religious values and economic prosperity has led to terroristic activities across the world.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take two major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and orally respond to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a terroristic event, individual, or group from history.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (18-20 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various theories and interpretations of terrorism are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able to evaluate critically scholarly research in the study of global terrorism and political violence

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and completion of General Education Core Curriculum, or consent of instructor

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Experience with the natural environment resulting in students actively seeking ways to combine environmental stewardship with professional and personal lives.

Course Content

Students in this course will develop a conceptual definition and personal philosophy of nature literacy through the investigation of research and reports that focus on initiatives in environmental stewardship, natural history, and local ecology. Additionally, they will be given the opportunity to demonstrate skill in critical and evaluative reasoning during and following guided nature instruction experiences. Course content blends the principles of culturally responsible values and practice, moral and ethical decision making, and the sustainability of the natural world and global economy. This constellation of experiences will enable the student to appreciate both the importance of environmental protection and the joy of nature.

Nature of Course

This course draws from the disciplines of human development, sociology, psychology, the arts, and biology. In studying the subject of nature literacy, students will explore topics that represent the following General Education Perspectives and Categories: Perspectives – Individual Expression, Natural Systems, and Human Institutions; Categories – Artistic Expression, Behavioral Systems, Living Systems, and Social Systems. Empirical works and theoretical perspectives from multiple disciplines will be discussed to provide a foundation and cultivate an appreciation for environmental stewardship in the natural community. The main objectives of the course are to integrate knowledge with an appreciation for the natural environment and to cultivate critical reasoning and evaluation skills. Through scientific processes, observation, experiential learning, course assignments, discussions, and informal debates, students will synthesize the course materials to develop a personal philosophy about their ability to learn from and respond to direct experiences with nature.

Student Expectations

  1. Read assigned materials, utilize available library resources, and participate in individual and group activities.
  2. Complete all assignments in a timely, professional manner. Students will be required to spend considerable time in an outdoor environment.
  3. Complete a research paper on the impact of chosen profession on the natural environment and efforts towards environmental stewardship in the student’s field.
  4. Successfully complete all examinations and regularly attend classes.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

 &

Catalog Description

Exploration of the history of capital punishment in US law, constitutional issues and policy arguments for and against the practice.

Course Content

 

Nature of Course

Summarize the history of the death penalty in United States society. Analyze Constitutional issues related to death penalty jurisprudence. Summarize the sociological theories relevant to the death penalty, including deterrence and retribution. Assess and analyze the finality of the death penalty and the effect of wrongful convictions and executions on the appropriateness of capital punishment. Analyze and discuss the concept of evolving standards of decency of our society and how that impacts the practice of capital punishment.

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to locate, read and critique all assigned cases and materials and to actively participate in all assignments (General Education Objectives 1, 2 & 9).
  2. Students will be required to analyze and synthesize information, demonstrate the ability to identify the legal, ethical and social values involved in complex issues related to capital punishment and demonstrate the ability to participate in online Forums on assigned topics (General Education Objectives 2, 3, 7 & 9).
  3. Students will be required to demonstrate the ability to seek to understand the perspectives of others as measured by their ability to write position papers on assigned death penalty topics (General Education Objectives 2, 3, 6, 7 & 9).
  4. Students will be required to analyze and synthesize information, demonstrate the ability to identify the legal, ethical and social values by engaging in research and reflection in the writing of a paper (1500 words) discussing the appropriateness of the death penalty as a form of punishment in contemporary American society (General Education Objectives 1, 2, 3, 7 & 9.

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

This course will investigate the development of Modernism in western culture by means of the arts produced at the time.

Course Content

Issues in Modern Art is designed as a chronological and thematic course aimed to expose students to the unique political, social, economic, and artistic innovations of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In this course, students will use works of art as a base from which to study these topics. Emphasis will be placed on the context in which works of art were produced in order to understand the aesthetic choices that artists made. Influences from non-western cultures will also be explored as a manifestation of an increasingly interconnected world that was one of the outcomes of the Modern period. Other such shifts in how people lived and worked will be addressed, such as the movement away from long established traditions to new modes of expression as an individual endeavor.

Students will use the insight gained from these types of discussions to explain the formal qualities of works of art and the reasons for their creation.

Nature of Course

The Modern period was a time of experimentation and reflection. The Industrial Revolution initiated advancements in society, but also inflicted hardships and caused suspicion. Different groups chose to react to the effects of the Modern world in different ways. Some of the Realists, for example, chose to document their experiences closely, thereby exposing issues of isolation and class distinction.

As the twentieth century approached, the inventions of the previous century became commonplace and allowed for the transmission of artistic styles, political movements, and social reforms between Western Europe, Asia, Africa, and the United States. As a result, artistic movements, such as Impressionism, which began in Paris, soon made its way to the United States. However, the exportation of artistic styles did not mean that each culture interpreted the movements in the same way. The hybridization of styles, like Impressionism, within a new cultural context was dependent on that groups own political, social, and artistic ideas. Therefore, each style appropriated elements of the culture in which it was practiced creating a new way of expression. In Europe, for example, the Impressionists became the painters of Modern life and recorded the emerging bourgeois class. Their landscapes and portraits documented their world and extolled the idea that their era was worthy of commemoration and equal to past cultures, like the Greeks and Romans.

As World War I loomed, European artists reacted to the political and social decay that they encountered. German Expressionists, like Franz Marc, documented the horrors of war through his paintings of animals. His own feelings toward the war evolved in his works as they became darker and more violent. He, like many of his countrymen, was appalled by the horror of war and the decimation of Germany. Europe would soon encounter a different Germany as Hitler gained power. An aspiring artist, Hitler used art, much like the Romans to create a new Germany, one that reflected the ideas of the Nazi regime.

Art produced after 1945 also reflects the cultural and social issues of the day. As the century progressed, cohesive movements that were common in Europe and the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were replaced with individual modes of expression. New media, such as television, added another dimension to artistic production. The very definition of art was challenged, making the sixties and seventies an exciting, yet problematic time for historians.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Take all tests and quizzes.
  3. Participate in class discussions and projects.
  4. Complete all assigned papers.
  5. Make assigned presentations.
  6. Participate in a field trip.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education Core Curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of Stalin’s Russia and the role of women through the prism of Suzanne Collins’s trilogy The Hunger Games. (3)

Course Content

The bestselling trilogy The Hunger Games (2008), Catching Fire (2009), and Mockingjay (2010) by Suzanne Collins, provides a frame for discussing seminal events in Russia’s political and cultural history during the early decades of the twentieth century. The fate of Collins’s heroine Katniss Everdeen serves as a basis for analyzing how totalitarian systems attempt to determine women’s lives. Course materials draw from the 1920s and 1930s, specifically, Soviet propaganda art, novels, magazines, and films, as well as biographies of renowned women, to examine the types of heroines and villains in Stalin’s Russia. The course emphasizes the construction of individual and collective identities, especially female identity, in both the nascent Soviet Union and the fictional Panem. This is achieved by studying the interaction and relationship between the totalitarian state (both imaginary and real) and women, who conform to or resist its dominion.

The course concludes with a study of how current developments in politics and popular culture relate to perceptions of Russia’s political past, present and future.

Nature of Course

Students will be able to list three Russian novels and films from the 1920s and 1930s. Students will identify a novelist’s point of view, his or her characterization of protagonists and antagonists, and the novel’s symbolism. Students will carry out basic analyses of film elements: framing, mise-en-scene, and music, and the roles of these elements in creating a cinematic experience

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Take all tests and quizzes.
  3. Participate in class discussions.
  4. Complete all assigned papers.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

 &

Catalog Description

Examination of social, psychological, economic, political, religious, and cultural factors that influence dress and human behavior.

Course Content

Students in the course will critically examine, analyze, and discuss the meanings of dress and related human behavior from a variety of disciplines, including sociology, psychology, politics, and biology. In studying the topic of dress and behavior, students will explore theoretical perspectives as well as empirical work from these disciplines.

Nature of Course

This course will integrate knowledge and awareness from several categories including behavioral systems, social systems, economic systems, and political systems. The study of the meanings of dress and human behavior crosses many boundaries and encompasses all races, all countries, all social arenas, and most geopolitical issues. The extensive course outline will allow students to integrate knowledge gained from professional works, everyday life and social interactions, and theoretical viewpoints identified in these scientific fields. The content of this course includes the following topics: the body in different demographics (gender, ethnicity, race, and religion) and across the lifespan; arts and the media; the economy; various cultures; and spirituality. In addition, many of the course assignments have been constructed in such a way as to accentuate the critical thinking needed to develop a deep understanding of the integrated nature of the study of the everyday dress experience.

Student Expectations

  1. Leading a class discussion on one of the course topics. Each student will lead the class discussion of one of the course topics and bring one current news article that addresses a social or cultural issue relevant to the topic along with three discussion questions as a stimulus for discussion.
  2. Preparing an oral presentation and written report on one of the course topics (the “Movie” project). Each student will select one chapter of the textbook and two movies relevant to the topic to understand the roles of dress and human behavior within a situation, will provide a minimum of two papers on the topic for class members to read before the presentation, will bring/develop a short dilemma/valuing exercise relevant to the topic to act as a stimulus for discussion, and will lead the class discussion of the topic.
  3. Observing a group of people (the “Paparazzi” project), writing a paper and preparing an oral presentation on the experience and analysis of the observation to share with the class.
  4. Attending class regularly and actively participating in class discussions.
  5. Completing assigned readings and turning in assignments on time.

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and completion of General Education Core Curriculum, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2207
generaleducation@semo.edu
Academic Hall 132

General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 3400
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701