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300-Level Interdisciplinary Courses

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course 

Catalog Description

Historical development of America’s agriculture and the interplay of economic, political, biological and cultural environments of modern America.

Course Content

American agriculture is poorly understood and appreciated by many people with close ties to agriculture; farmers themselves, professional agriculturalists, agribusiness leaders, and political leaders from rural areas. Many of the above seem to think that the present-day agriculture system of the United States economy jumped fully-developed into the twentieth century from some unknown past.

Yes, today’s agriculture provides the raw material food is produced from. Agriculture employs less than one percent of the population in farming, however 23 million or 17% of the population are indirectly employed in agriculture. Agriculture is 13% of our Gross National Product and exports $50 billion annually. Today’s agriculture includes recreation, companion animals, horticulture, and food. Americans enjoy the highest quality food at the most inexpensive rate in the world. Agriculture is America’s and the world’s largest Enterprise.

But this did not happen suddenly. The agriculture sector of the U. S. developed slowly from 1607 to the present. Its development was not easy; it developed over much of the period through trial-and-error in which farmers of one generation learned from the mistakes and failures of the previous generation. The costs of this process in terms of human suffering were huge. However, the physical and natural resources were abundant in the new world. Climatic and environmental conditions were favorable. The desire to acquire and own land was overwhelming. Thus, the earlier trappers, traders, and settlers drove relentlessly on, over nearly four centuries.

Nature of Course

Agricultural development is a cause as well as a consequence of economic development. Agriculture, especially food and fiber production, is the basic foundation for the successful economic development of most industrialized/developed countries. The successful development of a productive agriculture: 1) prevents society-wide starvation and 2) frees people for the development of other socioeconomic aspects desired by that society.

However, Agriculture does not develop independently of other socioeconomic systems. The political system a society adapts and employs is another major factor influencing agriculture development and the overall economic development of that country.

This course provides students the opportunity to study these systems in an integrated manner to better appreciate the history of the United States and Agriculture development. The use of economic resources (land, water, timber, labor, etc.) by the earlier settlers in order to survive and develop agriculture integrates subject matter and principles of the “economic” and “living” systems. The subject matter and principles from “political” system becomes integrated when the student studies the influence of public policy and political conflict upon how and who uses resources in a society. The students will learn to integrate and apply subject matter and principles of the “economic, political and living systems” throughout the course in the historical analysis of American Agriculture to learn: 1) the complexity of the agriculture development process and 2) whence the modern agriculture of the 1990’s comes and the direction in which it is trending.

Student Expectations

  • Regular class attendance, preparation, participation, in class discussion, completion of assignments in a timely manner, and peer evaluation of presentations.
  • Demonstrate their understanding of the topics of discussion and be able to integrate the material on examinations and class activities.
  • Research and write on a selected topic of historical importance to agriculture and present a critical analysis of the impact it had upon the development of a modern agriculture and highly developed society.
  • To participate in a group investigative project and make a 5-7 minute oral presentation (each project member) using appropriate visual aids and multimedia. The project will integrate economic, living and political systems knowledge and approaches to historical and current developments in Agriculture.

Prerequisites

Completion of one course from each of the Economic, Living and Political Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course 

Catalog Description

An exploration of innovation, opportunity, and new business creation as economic and personal imperatives for success in the global economy.

Course Content

Students probe, question, and evaluate the personal, social, and economic importance of entrepreneurship in the global economy as they acquire the knowledge, skills, and strategies critical for successful start-up and new business creation. Students consider critical foundational topics related to entrepreneurship including assessment of personal style, creative talents, and career interests compared to those of successful entrepreneurs, strategies used to create innovative ideas, methods used to evaluate durable market opportunities.

Nature of Course

This course provides a dynamic, practical, hands-on study of the nature and importance of entrepreneurship in the increasingly global economy and encourages students to immerse themselves in the vision, research, and planning aspects of a new business.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete a variety of readings and participate in classroom activities and discussions, reflect on the class in a weekly journal, complete several small projects and one extended project, and complete two short answer exams.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education requirements in behavioral, economic, political, and social systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course 

Catalog Description

A study of the design of the human built environment.

Course Content

Perspectives on Urban Design will integrate subject matter and approaches to Developing Perspectives on Human Institutions from the areas of “development of a major civilization” and “social systems.” This course will also integrate material relating to Individual Expression by examining the ways in which artistic expression has been an important component in the design of the human built environment.

Nature of Course

This course is designed to introduce students to various aspects of the design of the built environment and of the power of place in our lives. Over the course of the semester we will explore the design of the built environment within its general historical context in order to develop a perspective on why we build cities in the manner in which we do. We will explore the ways in which the human built environment is shaped by the interplay of political, social, economic, and cultural factors and examine major trends in the design of the built environment.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend class regularly, read all materials assigned, actively participate in class discussion, complete all written and oral assignments, including a research paper, demonstrate mastery of course content on examinations, and demonstrate proficiency in using information technology.

Prerequisites

Students should have completed their basic General Education Core, especially the Development of a Major Civilization, Social Systems, and Artistic Expression, and have junior standing.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

Concrete, effective person-to-person communication skills, expressing oneself to gain what is wanted without alienating others, listening to enhance understanding, and navigating conflicts. Also called non-violent communication (NVC).

Course Content

Effective oral communication skills based on Nonviolent Communication (NVC) created by Marshal B. Rosenberg. NVC embodies effective skills for expressing yourself to gain what you want without alienating others. Additional skills support enhanced understanding of yourself (self-empathy) and other (empathy). Skills are unified by a four-step model: observation, feeling, need, and request. NVC is used worldwide to help people solve conflicts peacefully.

Nature of Course

Effective oral communication is integral to any profession, such as social work, science, technology, and business. Over the course of the semester, students will elarn specific techniques of oral communication based on Nonviolent Communication (NVC) as presented by the Center for Nonviolent Communication and Dr. Marshall B. Rosenberg. Communication skills taught in this course are applicable at any level of practice, such as interpersonal, groups, or organizations. Students learn how to qpply techniques in both their personal and professional lives.

The emphasis in the course is on the interface of the category of Oral Expression (how does one communicate) and the category of Social Systems (how does one's communication function in one's social environment).

The course structure emphasizes that communication skills are essential to get one's needs met. However, in getting one's needs met, it is important to consider how one goes about this process. It is not just getting what you need from others, but why one wants others to act, that is important. Does one want another person to feel motivated to cooperate willingly or to comply with requests out of fear? In considering the answers to these questions, one must learn to discriminate in speaking in order to draw others towards him/herself, and to not drive others away.

The course will address the subtheme, "Integration of Knowledge: Living in an Interdependent Universe" as follows. We are dependent on others to meet many, if not most, of our needs. Students learn to consider the effects of their communication. How doe skilled communication work, and what are they ramifications of unskilled communication? Students consider these questions and learn Nonviolent Communication (NVC) not just for the sake of knowledge, but for the purpose of integrating new skills into their daily personal and professional lives.

Student Expectations

  1. Students will complete a research paper and oral presentation on Nonviolent Communication (NVC).
  2. Students will complete assigned readings and all other assignments before class and regularly come to class prepared for discussion. Participation and practice of communication skills is essential for success in the course.
  3. Students will complete exams (one hour mid-term exams and a final exam) at the time they are given in class.
  4. Students will keep a journal of their practice of NVC outside of class and their thoughts on journal articles, discuss practice with other students on Forum, and complete other assignments such as viewing relevant film clips.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

This course will explore professional literacy by introducing forms, methods, standards, and issues central to scientific and technical writing in academic and workplace environments.

Course Content

This course provides students with an opportunity to expand their awareness of professional literacy by introducing forms, methods, standards, and issues central to scientific and technical writing. Both product and process approaches will be utilized with an emphasis on making the transition from academic work to professional world writing tasks. Throughout this course, students will differentiate the conventions of writing and research for various genres; write documents for diverse audiences; develop strategic methods of writing which enhance credibility and effectiveness; analyze and synthesize research from a variety of sources; develop effective methods for collaboration; practice oral communication skills; develop an awareness of and utilize ethical workplace practices; experiment with a variety of technological tools, especially the use of graphics; reinforce usage of Edited Standard English.

Nature of Course

The principle guiding the course structure emphasizes that written communication is an integral component of professional work, whether that work be in science, technology, business, or other fields. Over the course of the semester, this class will focus on how written communication is used by science and technology professionals. Students will learn the many different ways written communication functions in their careers and then apply that knowledge for a variety of purposes and audiences (e.g. writing assignments may include lab notes, literature reviews, proposals, reports, instructions, etc.)

The course combines the perspectives from Written Expression (through written documents), Oral Expression (through oral presentations and collaborative assignments), Living Systems or Physical Systems (through the use of case studies to prompt writing), and Behavioral Systems or Social Systems (through analysis of audience to guide rhetorical choices).

The course will address the subtheme, Integration of Knowledge: Living in an Interdependent Universe through an emphasis on appropriately analyzing audience and communicating effectively. For example, a portion of the course will examine the content and style of communication appropriate to various audiences (e.g. the local community, funding sources, colleagues, the scientific community, etc.) when providing information about a scientific case, and on strategies for making scientific research and proposed solutions to problems accessible to those various audiences.

Student Expectations

  • Attend class regularly
  • Complete all of the assigned reading
  • Take an active role in collaborative assignments (e.g. contributing to discussions, completing work
  • assigned by the group, meeting group-imposed deadlines, etc.)
  • As outlined by case study prompts, conduct necessary research and then complete all written assignments (four major projects-two completed collaboratively and two completed individually; projects will consist of multiple documents including but not limited to correspondence writing, literature reviews, proposals, reports, web pages, informational handouts and brochures, instructions, etc.; impromptu assignments in which students will have a class period to complete a writing task that appropriately responds to a given scenario)
  • Compile a final portfolio consisting of a representative collection of the students' writing and a self reflection on skills learned as evidenced by the portfolio's contents
  • Present a project orally to the class
  • Demonstrate an understanding of course content by applying the skills and strategies learned over the course of the semester to the tasks assigned for the final exam

Prerequisites

EN140 and any course from Behavioral Systems, Living Systems, or Physical Systems. This course will build upon the base level of knowledge attained in these courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

A survey of social, economic and international forces that influence politics of East Asian societies.

Course Content

The primary objective of this course is to survey the governments and politics in East Asia. The goal is to become familiar with the contemporary social, economic, and international forces that influence politics of those societies as well as their historical backgrounds. The course will focus on some common themes across the nations in the region, but we will also look at some issues specific to individual countries.

Nature of Course

 

Student Expectations

  • Active, informed participation in class discussions.
  • Satisfactory performance on examinations.
  • Demonstration of critical thinking skills in all written and oral presentations. (A ten-page research paper and oral presentation based on the paper.)
  • Timely completion of all assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

The history, relevancy, and applications of geotechnology in today’s society. Two hours of lecture and one two hour lab.

Course Content

This course provides an overview of geographic information science (GIScience). This includes knowledge-based computational modeling of activities and processes in the human and natural environments using geospatial data and geographic information systems (GIS) technology. Impacts of GIS technology on individuals and society with respect to past, current and future trends will be examined. Review of discipline-specific applications, along with use of geographic data and GIS software, will be employed for issue analysis and problem solving.

Nature of Course

Geographic Information Science is the field of study which assesses and/or interprets the distribution of natural phenomena and human activities across different scales using geospatial information technologies and methodologies, such as remote sensing and GIS. The complex nature and interrelatedness of said phenomena and activities require multidisciplinary solutions which GIScience addresses. It incorporates recent developments in cognitive and information science into traditional geographic and cartographic approaches of problem solving. Moreover, since GIS methodology is used in dealing with some of society’s most pressing issues, such as crime, health, and disaster response, GIScience draws from other specialized fields like computer science, psychology, political science and anthropology.

Student Expectations

  • Attend all meetings and participate in classroom discussion and lab activities.
  • Graduate students are required to do the latter.
  • Give a minimum of a 10 minute powerpoint presentation of the aforementioned findings/results to the class.
  • Perform satisfactorily on examinations, class assignments and lab activities.

Prerequisites

Completion of core General Education courses in logical systems, physical systems, and social systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

Social and ethical issues and controversies concerning new and evolving technologies in the cyber-world.

Course Content

Cyber-technology refers to a broad spectrum of computing and information technologies that range from stand-alone computers to the cluster of networked computing, information, and communications technologies. The moral, legal and social issues and controversies involving cyber-technology will be discussed. For example, the moral responsibility that directly affects computer and information-technology professionals and users will be examined. The broader social and ethical concerns, such as privacy, security, crime, intellectual property, and Internet regulations that affect each of us in our day-to-day lives are also covered. Questions about the roles and responsibilities of computer and information-technology professionals in developing safe and reliable computer systems are examined. Moreover, students will apply cyber-world ethics to real-life situations and apply existing ethical problems to the cyber-world.

Nature of Course

Students from all academic disciplines use cyber-technologies. They use personal computers, laptops, and handheld devices, and they access the internet. They interact with friends and family through MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter, and they view and upload videos to YouTube. They interact with other people in virtual worlds and participate in multiplayer online games. They complete assignments using Microsoft Word and reference Wikipedia as an encyclopedia. Cyber-technologies, whether emerging or converging, are implanted in many personal items, home appliances, cars, and public transportation. Using these technologies raises some ethical, social, and professional challenges that affect each of us in our day-to-day lives. Issues and controversies that comprise cyber-ethics will be examined. Actual and hypothetical case studies will be discussed where students can bring their own discipline and personal experiences. All students will find many issues covered in this course pertinent to their personal and professional lives. This course integrates the categories of Oral Expression and Written Expression within the Individual Expression perspective. Students in the course will perform public speaking (in the class setting) where they will verbally and nonverbally communicate their ideas and opinions regarding cyber-technology-related ethical issues. They can use evidence, reasoning, and example to elaborate upon their opinions. In this course, a research paper is required and the students will present a summary of their research findings. They will communicate such information while using visual aids. Students will engage in discussions, and debate and advocate their opinions. In addition, written assignments will assess students' ability to relate the material covered in class to their own experiences and case studies in their world. Students will apply discussed and debated cyber-world ethics to real-life situations. They will also relate many cyber-technology ethical issues to variations of existing ethical problems.

Student Expectations

  1. Participate in discussions and activities related to different topics covered in class. There will be weekly discussions engaging students in debates regarding a cyber-technology ethical issue.
  2. Complete 3-4 exams and demonstrate working knowledge of course concepts through satisfactory performance on exams. The exams will consist of multiple choice questions, True/False questions, matching questions, and short essay questions.
  3. Complete weekly short-essay assignments and demonstrate working knowledge of course concepts and ability to integrate personal and non-personal experiences.
  4. Write a research paper on a contemporary cyber-technology ethical issue and present findings. Paper will be 3-5 pages in length, and references should be current refereed articles and/or books. The presentation will be 5 to 10 minutes long.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

Basic concepts in system theory, system models, applications in social, economical, ecological, biological, chemical and physical systems. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour lab.

Course Content

This course covers the basic concepts in system theory: stock and flow, positive and negative feedback. It also discusses logistic growth with carrying capacity, oscillation in linear systems, limit cycle and chaos in nonlinear systems. After learning the simulation software, systems in six different areas will be discussed: physical systems, engineering systems, chemical/biological systems, ecological systems, economic systems and social systems. Students are required to investigate one out of these six areas listed above by constructing s system model and simulation, and then write a project report and give a presentation. In addition, students also need to write three essays on three of the remaining areas.

Nature of Course

This course satisfies the requirements of a 300 level interdisciplinary course because it integrates all three perspectives, and two or more categories within each perspective. Systems can be analyzed at different levels. The highest level is on the fundamental relationship, such as positive and negative feedback, etc. At the next level, mathematics is involved, which describes such relationships in a specific way. At the bottom level is the applications in specific systems. Therefore, systems in different areas can be described by the same mathematic equation, and the fundamental relationships can be found in all the systems. Specifically, the topics of this course integrate Living Systems, Logical Systems, and Physical Systems from the Perspective on Natural Systems, and Economic Systems and Social Systems from the Perspective on Human Institutions. In addition, each student needs to write a project report and give an oral presentation, and thus this course also integrates Oral Expression and Written Expression in the Perspective on Individual Expressions.

Although the phenomena in natural systems and human institutions are quite different, they share some basic system dynamics. First, birth and death are common phenomena, i.e. something seems to appear from nowhere and then grows rapidly, while something else will subside and gradually disappear. Second, there are phenomena with periodic oscillations, such as economic cycles, and chemical clocks. Third, there is competition and collaboration among the entities sharing the same environment, and their relationship will largely determine their survivability.

Student Expectations

  1. Be inquisitive and actively engaged in class activities.
  2. Learn the basic concepts and analyzing methods in dynamic systems.
  3. Learn to use the software to simulate system behavior.
  4. Do homework and practice the simulations.
  5. Gather information and find relevant topics to investigate.
  6. Write three essays on different systems.
  7. Do research and simulation on a selected project, write a report and present the result.
  8. Perform satisfactorily on course exams(s).

Prerequisites

Completion of core General Education courses in logical systems, physical systems, oral expression and written expression is recommended.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

Course enhances creative thinking and problem solving to achieve creative solutions. Includes exposure to idea generation & problem solving processes.

Course Content

This course introduces students to a broad approach in studying key aspects of and formal techniques in creative problem solving, which are applicable to any field of endeavor or interest. It is designed to enhance an individual’s creative thinking and problem solving skills in which the circumstances require unique and creative solutions. Students will be exposed to individual and team-based idea generation methods, along with a variety of formal problem solving processes, which can be applied immediately to personal or professional challenges in the student’s life.

Nature of Course

Each student will be asked to complete skill practices using various tools and techniques. These skill practices are designed to help the student value, understand, practice with feedback, and master various tools and techniques necessary in understanding creativity.

Student Expectations

  1. Participation in problem-solving activities while showing regard for others
  2. Students are expected to conduct necessary research to fulfill classroom assignments using online resources, the textbook, handouts and the library.

Prerequisites

Junior/Senior Level Status

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary coverage of psychoactive drugs from the perspectives of psychopharmacology, history, and criminal justice.

Course Content

This course examines the major classes of psychoactive drugs and their use in cultures past and present. Specific drugs studied include cocaine, amphetamine, nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, heroin, barbiturates, valium, marijuana and hashish. Special topics such as designer drugs, undercover investigations, drug use during the war in Vietnam, and DEA operations in South America are also covered. The history of psychoactive substance use/abuse across cultures and the response of governments and legislatures in attempting to control and regulate public access are major themes of the course.

An understanding of drug use and addictive behaviors also requires an awareness of physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of these substances on the human brain and body. The basic principles of psychopharmacology are covered, following each drug through administration, absorption, distribution and final elimination from the body. These topics in psychopharmacology and the physiological basis of addictive behaviors are considered fundamental in helping the student reach a responsible, informed and critical view of psychoactive substances in their current historical and cultural context.

Nature of Course

The course involves considerable lecture material and assigned readings, but there is also emphasis on discussion and student interaction in class. Selected guest speakers with extensive knowledge of drug addiction, law enforcement or drug treatment provide opportunities for students to query experts directly. Round table discussions with the instructors provide a format for students to share thoughts on the course and their concerns/interests.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussions.
  2. Give a brief oral presentation as part of a class debate.
  3. Complete a term paper and one small paper.
  4. Complete 4 exams.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An examination and application of appropriate managerial communicative techniques for leading others to perform well in various organizational contexts.

Course Content

This course examines theory and application from the disciplines of communication and management and operates on the premise that effective managers are effective communicators. Communication-management skills are examined and applied to a variety of interpersonal, group, and audience contexts. Communicative techniques pertain to oral reporting, interviewing, problem-solving, goal setting, coaching and listening. These skills are practiced in a variety of group and individual settings to meet work-related challenges.

Nature of Course

A wide variety of communication-management experiences are provided in the class. Both individual and group learning opportunities are stressed in course assignments. Class participation and involvement are required. Analytical application of course content is achieved by means of a research paper which is required to link a communication component with a management application.

Student Expectations

  1. Active participation in classroom discussions and group assignments.
  2. Satisfactory completion of a research paper, an oral report over that paper and two research bibliographies over group project topics.
  3. Demonstration of creative, energetic and team oriented leadership behavior in two group projects.
  4. Satisfactory performance on examinations.

Prerequisites

SC-105 or an equivalent introductory oral communication course.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A seminar studying the past and present experiences of women in diverse culture to enhance the human experience.

Course Content

Students in the course will explore the experience of being female in today’s world through the lenses of various disciplines. An appreciation for the gains of feminism will uncover an awareness of growth yet to occur. Students will be given the opportunity to connect discrimination to current injustices and identify future moves on the path to equality.

Nature of Course

Students will be able to gather traditional and alternative sources of information, demonstrate the ability to locate and gather print and multimedia evidence showing the array of female personality. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by analyzing the influence of women on global issues. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills in presentations that highlight future outcomes for women in society. Through economic, political, social, and behavioral perspectives, demonstrate the ability to integrate new understandings about the female experience with traditional and contemporary paradigms.

Student Expectations

  1. Active participation in classroom discussions and group assignments.
  2. Satisfactory performance on examinations.

Prerequisites

Oral Expression; Written Expression. (3)

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A normative and descriptive examination of the role of the courts in contemporary American society via the principles of judicial reasoning.

Course Content

This course is a normative and descriptive examination of the principles of judicial reasoning. Attention is given to the roles of logic, economics, history, intuition, precedent, and analogy in judicial reasoning.

Courts resolve complex disputes. Just how course should do the job--the proper role of the courts in society--is a matter of some dispute. The course examines the role of courts in society through a study of the principles that underlie judicial decisions. Specifically, the course examines the diverse factors--statutory, logical, historical, economic, political, social, and psychological--that actually enter into making a judicial decision, and examines whether such factors should play a role.

The course examines the view of judicial reasoning known as mechanical jurisprudence, which holds that logic alone should be used in making decisions. Mechanical jurisprudence is an alluring theory (as is its close relation in constitutional law, the theory of original intent), but one that is deeply flawed. A well-made judicial decision (regardless of the specific area of law in which the decision is made) is a careful mix of logic, history, psychology, economics, social theory, and politics.

This is not a course in law. Rather it is a course in meta-law. It is about law and courts as instruments of social control and change. Analytical philosophical techniques, including formal logic, are employed throughout the course.

Nature of Course

This course is both reading and writing intensive. Students will be expected to do a good deal of assigned reading, as well as a good deal of independent reading. The reading material is often complex, so students should be prepared to devote at least six hours per week to the reading assignments. Class sessions will combine lecture and discussion, and students should be prepared to participate actively in class discussions. Essay questions are a component in all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in class discussions. Students will complete two papers: one expository and one analytical. In addition, students will prepare a brief class presentation. There are two midterms and a final examination.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and completion of lower division General Education curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

American film as both historical and literary document from its origins to the present time in feature films, television, and documentaries.

Course Content

The course is designed around both a genre approach to film (war, westerns, science fiction, musicals, crime) and an examination of the ways American films have viewed particular problems and groups (e.g.. African-Americans and gender). The course explores the proposition that films can sway public opinion and values, reinforce stereotypes, and are, at best, mediocre historians.

The particular films and topics vary from semester to semester. Usually there are three areas under investigation. In 2006 those areas will be the African-American experience in feature films, westerns as history and metaphor, and science fiction. Four “must see” films will be selected from each area spanning the period from 1915 to the present.

Nature of Course

This is both a discussion and laboratory class. One or more lab sessions will be established for viewing films.

Student Expectations

To help develop skills in information gathering and written communication, each student will be required to do a research and writing project using the skills learned in the course to analyze one film. The textbook will be supplemented by readings distributed to the class.

Prerequisites

Development of a Major Civilization and Literary Expression.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

 &

Catalog Description

Examination of economic development for three spatial levels: international, national, and metropolitan from a geographic perspective.

Course Content

 

Nature of Course

 

Student Expectations

  1.  

Prerequisites

Economic Systems; Social Systems

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A geographical analysis of world landscapes utilizing physical, cultural and economical concepts to illustrate complex interrelationships existing between various regions.

Course Content

The cultural and physical environments of the world will be evaluated with analytical techniques in order to understand better the geographical similarities and differences between major regions of the world. Contemporary problems and space utilization will be examined. Social problems (e.g. over population, population shifts, literacy, agricultural production and distribution, have and have not nations) will be studied. The interdisciplinary nature is achieved through the integration of Physical Social, and Economic Systems.

Nature of Course

Reading of the textbook and outside assignments in Kent Library are necessary to be a participant in class discussions. Evaluation of maps, graphs, and statistical charts will be interwoven through the course. There will be out-of-class group projects and a term paper to be completed by each student. Each student must actively participate in the group projects. Projects, the term paper, and class participation account for 25% of the course grade. Examinations account for 75% of the final course grade.

Student Expectations

  1. Group Projects--actively participate in the following:
    1. Library work and
    2. Field exercise.
  2. Short Writing Assignments--meet the appropriate deadlines.
  3. Term Paper--meet the appropriate deadlines.
  4. Class Participation
    1. Lecture
    2. Oral presentation of written work.

Prerequisites

Physical, Social and Economic Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary study of the causes and effects of crime and delinquency.

Course Content

This course examines the possible causes of crime and delinquency from an interdisciplinary perspective. It attempts to integrate information from such diverse disciplines as anthropology, biology, criminal justice, criminology, economics, psychology, and sociology. It studies crime and delinquency from a historical, as well as from a cross-cultural perspective.

Each of the various explanations of crime and delinquency are compared and contrasted along the following dimensions: (1) assessing its claims objectively; (2) searching for flaws in its logical presentation; thinking through its implications; and (4) applying its implications to political and social issues. An attempt is then made toward the end of the semester to synthesize these explanations into a coherent, integrated theory.

Nature of Course

This course has significant reading and writing components. In addition to the assigned readings, each student will complete two to four written assignments concerning a correlate of crime and/or delinquency. Class sessions will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, and students should be prepared to participate actively in discussions.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in discussions.
  2. Complete four examinations with short-answer and essay components.
  3. Complete four brief written assignments.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education requirements in the following categories: Behavioral Systems and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An examination of the musical experience of the American people as manifested in folk, ethnic, jazz, and pop music, and music in the fine art tradition.

Course Content

The American Musical Experience is a one-semester attempt to take in the broad spectrum of American culture and history using music as our entry. While much of the thrust of the semester's work will be to become better acquainted with the historical and developmental aspects of America's musics, we will not ignore their numerous cultural, aesthetic and formal/structural elements. Music criticism and music appreciation (in the broadest sense of both ideas) will be encouraged and refined through reading, listening, discussion and reflection.

This course is a "TOPICS" course, rather than a broad chronological survey of American Music. The semester will be divided into a series of subject areas, each dealing with a specific aspect in the history of American music. Possible topics include American Musical Theater, Music of Native Americans, The Anglo Tradition in American Music; The African-American Tradition in American Music; America Goes to War--Music from WWI, WWII and Vietnam; The Blended Tradition--Rock, Soul & Pop; From Florida to California--Latin Musics in America. Each semester will begin with a general introduction to musical terminology and the tools of critical listening. Following this introduction, the rest of the semester will be divided between two or three subject areas.

Nature of Course

The American Musical Experience will utilize musicology, cultural anthropology, iconography, organology, and history. By the semester's end, students should have more than a passing acquaintance with the tools, materials and critical/analytical machinery of musicology, a field built on the concept of interdisciplinary scholarship.

Students are expected to develop an understanding of the chronology and general themes of American music through their reading of the course textbook and supplementary readings as well as listening to assigned pieces. Class time will be spent in lecture and discussion based on more in-depth consideration of particular aspects of the listenings and readings.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend all classes.
  2. Complete all reading and listening assignments prior to class.
  3. Participate in class by contributing to discussions with observations, questions and responses that are germane to the subject at hand.
  4. Pass three examinations on the dates listed on the course calendar. These exams will include essay questions and analysis/critique of listening examples.
  5. Write one (1) research paper on a specific topic from the area of American music.

Prerequisites

At least Junior status (completion of 60 credits or more) and ability to read music.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Contemporary issues will be analyzed and placed into historical perspective. Emphasis on use of the historical method for analysis.

Course Content

Understanding current issues requires the individual not only to know the nature of the issue, but also to be able to place it in its broad historical perspective. Students will learn to identify enduring issues, to understand the techniques researchers employ to analyze such topics, and to develop skill in use of the historical method. The course also encourages students to compare the historical method with the approaches used by specialists in other disciplines. Guest lecturers will share the tools and perspectives of their disciplines with the class. Topics will vary from semester to semester depending on the expertise of the faculty member(s) teaching the course, availability of outside experts as lecturers, and student interests. Possible topics include crime and punishment, international terrorism, human rights, utopian societies, medical experimentation, or the occult.

Nature of Course

This course is organized in a discussion format. Students are expected to read from a variety of sources and to share that information and their conclusions about the information with the class.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to participate actively in the identification of enduring issues and the pursuit of multiple approaches to understanding and solving them. Students will produce a brief position paper on each topic studied. In addition, each student will analyze one issue in depth, demonstrating understanding of the nature of the issue and of the methodology by which it might best be studied. The final presentation will allow the student to demonstrate analytical skills and knowledge of the historical method.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and successful completion of the categories: Development of a Major Civilization, Social Systems, Behavioral Systems, Written Expression and Oral Expression or by permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A study of the historical and literary culture of African-Americans from the slave experience to the twentieth century.

Course Content

The African diaspora wrenched Africans from their homes and brought them to work as slaves in America. In the more than two centuries of slavery, the culture of America and the African-Americans themselves was irreversibly changed. The course will center around this experience and follow the freedmen into the twentieth century.

Besides the literary/historical material, the course will reflect some very broad themes that have been consistently important in the African-American experience.

Nature of Course

The course attempts to weave together the experience recorded by those who research the facts (historians) with those who tell the story (novelists/poets/playwrights/ filmmakers) of a people.

The teaching method used will be largely lecture-discussion. Throughout the semester students will be challenged to think about and analyze issues dealing with the experience of African-Americans. The discussion method will be employed extensively for maximum student involvement.

Student Expectations

Since this is an examination of African-American life from both a historical and literary perspective, it will be necessary for students to read from both disciplines. The textbook will be augmented by literary materials. There will be three examinations and a research project required of each student.

Prerequisites

Development of a Major Civilization; Literary Expression.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Theoretical and "hands on" experience with musical applications of electronics and computers.

Course Content

This course presents an examination of the production of music using electronic means and an exposition of the uses of electronics and computers in music research, music printing, and musical data storage. In depth discussions of audio electronics, acoustics, computers and computer languages are included in the course as well as expositions of musical topics.

The first section of the class consists of an overview of electro-acoustic music describing how the technology of electronic music evolved. The second section of the course deals with the use of computers to manipulate musical data. Both sections stress the scientific principles behind the technology. Recorded musical examples will demonstrate uses of the technology and will help to show the relationship between technology and aesthetic trends.

Nature of Course

Only a moderate amount of reading will be expected of the students (a 218 page textbook). Writing will be limited to a short paper (5 to 10 pages) and essay questions on the examinations. Two creative projects (an electronic music composition and a short computer program) will occupy much of the students' time outside class. The projects will require 3 to 10 hours of work each. Much of the work on these projects requires the specialized equipment found in the music department's Electronic-Computer Music Laboratory. This is a shared facility. Students will need to schedule judiciously time in the laboratory in order to finish their projects. Class sessions will mix discussions of trends, techniques, and principles with hands-on demonstrations. While an interest in music of all kinds is desirable, no previous musical training is necessary.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend all class sessions.
  2. Complete one short paper, one short electronic music composition, one short computer music program, and a significant final project (a musical composition, computer program, or electronic music device).
  3. Complete 2 examinations and a cumulative final examination.

Prerequisites

Junior standing - lower level General Education classes in Artistic Expression, Logical Systems, and Natural Systems should be complete. While some experience with music, computers, electronics, and acoustics is helpful, classes in these courses are not prerequisites for this course.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course is an examination of current legal issues and the role of the American legal system in the resolution of those issues.

Course Content

This course examines the current legal issues, which are now or may become of concern to the student. It presents the issues from different viewpoints, acquaints the student with the rival interest and concerns therein, explores the legal solutions, and encourages the student to evaluate all the alternatives indicated. The purpose is not to force a particular conclusion upon the student, but rather to allow the student to reach his or her own conclusion after developing an appreciation of and sensitivity to those competing interests and concerns. The controversial nature of some of the issues is recognized. A thoughtful, serious, and sensitive treatment of those issues will be offered.

Nature of Course

Students must have completed 45 hours to take this course. Completion of at least one law course is highly recommended. Course emphasis is on reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking. Appellate court cases and statutory legislation will be read and analyzed. Students will be required to prepare and submit writing assignments and perform satisfactorily on all exams and quizzes. Students may be required to participate in a long research project. Oral presentations utilizing student research will be required. Class discussions using the Socratic method to analyze the reading assignments will be the prevalent teaching method.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to attend class regularly and punctually; perform careful, regular, thorough, and timely preparation of all material assigned, including readings, written assignments, research, and oral presentations; participate actively in all class discussions; and make satisfactory scores on all periodic examinations. The research must be interdisciplinary. The student will be expected to formulate and defend his or her judgments and solutions in both oral and written form after analyzing and interpreting the readings and research results.

Prerequisites

45 hours.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of human sexuality, emphasizing biological, psychological, and sociological aspects. Sexuality issues dealing with critical thinking and valuing will be emphasized.

Course Content

This course is a study of human sexuality, emphasizing biological, psychological, and sociological aspects. A variety of topics (such as anatomy, physiology, conception, contraception, STD’s, sexual development, sexual behavior, sexual variations, and sexual dysfunction among others) will be covered from a multidisciplinary perspective. Those issues of sexuality dealing with critical thinking and valuing will be emphasized. This approach should provide the knowledge foundation that will allow students to make intelligent decisions regarding sexual functioning in an interdependent universe.

Nature of Course

The course will require some readings in addition to those found in the text. These readings will primarily be associated with specific projects. Students will have the opportunity to participate in several projects (e.g. values clarification exercise, etc.), classroom discussions, and involvement in assignments outside of the formal classroom (e.g. reactions to classroom exercises). The outside projects will have a strong emphasis on writing. The teaching format will be essentially lecture/discussion, with some emphasis on experiential involvement (values clarification exercises, problem solving, etc.).

Student Expectations

Student expectations include class involvement, participation in classroom discussions, successful completion of both in-class and out-of-class projects, and appropriate achievement on examinations (essentially objective and short essay format). These examinations will emphasize knowledge acquisition, development of critical thinking skills, ability to write, an awareness of cultural diversity, and an ability to integrate (at least to appreciate) various perspectives on sexuality.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education requirements in the following categories: Living Systems, Behavioral Systems, and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A process-oriented investigation of the interrelationships among the Earth Sciences and their interaction with living systems. One two-hour lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Course Content

This course is a process-oriented investigation of the interrelationships among the earth sciences (atmospheric science, oceanography, geology, and astronomy) and their interaction with the living system.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to meet for one two-hour lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students must have completed BS-218 Biological Science: A Process Approach prior to taking UI-318.

"Group activities" is a more appropriate term for the laboratory component of the course. Students, working in groups, experience an array of hands-on, process-based activities that deal not only with the earth sciences, but also with earth science/biological relationships and science/societal issues. The specific nature of these activities vary from in-lab investigations to class debates.

UI-318 puts considerable emphasis on independent student research and writing as exemplified in the "Student Expectations" section. Basically, the course is characterized by a process-based, teacher-response approach as opposed to the more traditional student-response approach.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class sessions and participate in class discussions.
  2. Actively participate in laboratory and field activities.
  3. Satisfactorily complete all assignments and make acceptable scores on examinations.
  4. Make cooperative contributions to project teams.
  5. Achieve integration of the interdisciplinary components of the course.
  6. Submit two lessons plans that address the interdisciplinary relationship between the living system and two of the four subfields of earth science: geology, oceanography, atmospheric science, and astronomy.

Prerequisites

BS-218 Biological Science: A Process Approach.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

The impact of technology on individuals and society through critical analysis of selected modern topics using communication and critical thinking skills.

Course Content

  1. Course Introduction and Overview - Structure, Discipline and Purpose.
  2. Science, Technology and Society - Definitions, Relationships and Impacts.
  3. Societies Changing Attitudes about Technology.
  4. Contemporary Issues and Adaptations.
    1. Science, Technology and Medicine.
    2. Environmental Issues.
    3. Energy Usage Issues.
    4. Science, Technology and the Space Age.
    5. The Information Age.
    6. Business and Industry in the 21st Century.
  5. Presentations.

Nature of Course

This course will utilize the students communications and critical analysis skills in the study of the impact of science and technology on society. Topics studied will examine the 20th century impact of science and technology upon society and investigate potential 21st century problems. Students will develop an interdisciplinary approach through the critical analysis of technical journals, class discussions and formal presentations which will allow them the opportunity to explore science, technology and society issues.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussion.
  2. Perform satisfactory on all quizzes, midterm and final examinations.
  3. Complete all assigned reading and journal reviews.
  4. Participate in a group presentation and paper.

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of courses in General Education categories of Economics, Social, Physical and Political Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Examination of the modern American presidency from the combined perspectives of history, political science, and speech communication.

Course Content

This course gives descriptive and analytic insight to one of the world's leading political institutions, the modern American presidency dating from the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt. This is a thoroughly political institution with a rich history in which modern practitioners rely heavily on mass communications as a means of getting the job done.

This course shows historical development of the presidency from Roosevelt to George W. Bush, illustrating its elevated use of the fundamental principles of public communication as a means of resolving the elementary political challenges all presidents face. Visual media showing presidents "in the act" are complements to the reading.

Nature of Course

This is a team-taught course based on reasoned discussion and argument with classroom participants. A class will begin with a thematic argument based on the pre-assigned reading. This is used as an analytic device to provoke debate and to establish premises for further discussion at later classes. Students are expected to do all reading conscientiously, in advance, and to be prepared to ask assistance on whatever is not understood. We will make clear what we seek when a paper is assigned or an exam date approaches.

Specific interest in politics, history, or speech and communication is useful, but not required nor necessary. Every student is deeply influenced by how presidents conduct their business; all majors are equally welcome to learn how this is so.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend and participate in class. This is not a straight lecture-and-copy class, so come prepared to question and discuss the material. In a typical semester students will take periodic objective quizzes to insure knowledge of basic factual content, write 3-4 analytical essays requiring critical evaluation, give one oral report as part of a group symposium, and complete a major research paper which goes significantly beyond what is treated in class. Students are also afforded the opportunity to earn credit by attending showings of filmed documentaries about the presidents studied. In addition, a significant field trip (e.g., a visit to a Presidential Library) or other activity (e.g., a conference or a visit by a noted authority on the presidency) is usually planned.

Prerequisites

Sophomore standing or higher.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Exploration of the interaction of political and economic forces as it affects international flows of goods, money, investments and technology.

Course Content

The purpose of this course is to assist the student in developing a global perspective regarding the interaction between the political environment and business and economic decision-making. This will be done by analyzing both historical and current events in light of various theories, including Marxism, Liberalism (pure market capitalism) and Realism. Some possible topics to be discussed include the political and economic causes and consequences of international trade, foreign aid, multinational corporations, the international debt problem, American hegemony, the Japanese "threat" to the American economy, the European Economic Community, and the International Monetary Fund. Students will be called upon to evaluate various information based on their own values as well as the values underlying the various theories. For example, after examining the economic and political relations between the United States and Japan, discussion might focus on the desirability of restricting these relations. After completing this class, the student will have a better understanding of current world events and be better able to evaluate current economic policies and foreign policy objectives of the United States and other countries.

Nature of Course

Students will be expected to do a great deal of reading from the textbook and other assigned sources. Some of the material is quite complex and students should expect to spend five to six hours per week reading course assignments. For those with a weak background in economics and political science, some extra background reading will be necessary. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to participate in class discussions and question/answer sessions; this participation will constitute a significant portion of the class grade.

Student Expectations

  1. Active, informed participation in class discussions.
  2. Satisfactory performance on a mid-term and final exam.
  3. Complete one term paper on a topic of the student's choice (with guidance from the instructor).
  4. Complete one or two article analyses.
  5. Prepare a class presentation on one of the article analyses.
  6. Timely completion of all assignments.

Prerequisites

Political Systems and Economic Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Selected experiments in physics and engineering with emphasis on measurement system design, equipment selection, acquisition and evaluation of data, and written and oral reporting. One lecture and two two-hour labs. Fall only.

Course Content

This course emphasizes experimental methodology employed by practicing physicists and engineers. The specific physics content of the experiment is of secondary importance compared to using good experimental techniques and good data acquisition and analysis techniques. Emphasis is placed on detailed comparison of experimental results with applicable theory. Students perform selected, non-prescribed, open-ended experiments in physics and engineering and then write two, journal-style reports and give two professional presentations on their work. Possible topics for experimental investigation include fiber optics, modern physics, lasers, optics, rotational dynamics, microwaves, thermal conductivity, holography, nuclear physics, and telescope resolution.

During the first week of the course, lectures cover topics such as statistical data analysis, error analysis and propagation, graphical analysis and least-squares fitting of data, computer resources for data analysis, resources for outside research, keeping a lab journal, and professional and ethical dimensions of physics and engineering.

Students then perform three experiments lasting two weeks each. A week of workshops follows on technical writing and technical presentations run by guest faculty from the English and Communication Departments. Students submit a formal written report in the format of a professional journal article and make a formal presentation to the Physics and Engineering Physics Department during a Common Hour. Students then perform three more experiments and again write a formal report and give a formal presentation during Common Hour.

Nature of Course

This course stresses working in lab groups with minimal direction from the instructor. Students are given questions that they are to answer experimentally. They become familiar with available equipment, design an experiment that will minimize sources of error to answer the questions, collect and analyze data, make detailed comparisons of their data with an appropriate theoretical model that they either developed through research or derivation, and then draw appropriate conclusions. The idea is to simulate, to the extent possible, the professional environment of a practicing physicist or engineer.

Student Expectations

  1. Be inquisitive and show initiative as to what and how to investigate the phenomenon under study.
  2. Prepare for efficient use of lab time by doing outside reading and research before coming to lab.
  3. Maintain two lab journals into which all lab-related work goes. While one journal is being graded, the other will be used.
  4. Be prepared to discuss your approach and respond to instructor inquiries as to the reasoning behind your approach.

Prerequisites

Logical Systems (MA-134 or higher); PH-121/021 or PH-231/031.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Structure and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. Generation and utilization of energy.

Course Content

Foundations of Biochemistry describes the structure and biological function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. The function of the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation in energy production is discussed. Nucleic acid structure and function is introduced.

Nature of Course

The emphasis in this course is on reading - primarily the textbook. Writing is also emphasized: all exams are essay exams. There are some group and out-of-class projects. The teaching method is lecture/discussion.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all problem assignments, four one-hour exams, and a comprehensive final exam. Basis for student evaluation:

  • Problem sets - 15%
  • Hour exams - 70%
  • Final exam - 15%

Prerequisites

CH-342 or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Investigation of the views of women which have prevailed and still prevail in literary thought. For English and non-English majors.

Course Content

The past literary tradition has been essentially a male tradition. Few female writers were included in anthologies and survey courses, and many images of women were stereotypic rather than realistic. This course attempts to correct some of the bias of the past by focusing on feminist criticism, new images of women (both male and female authors), and stereotypes of female characters that have for too long gone unquestioned in literary study. Included in the course are English, American, European, and Third World authors, as well as representative minority writers from American culture. The five major literary genres, the short story, the play, the essay, the poem, and the novel, will all be represented.

Nature of Course

This course stresses reading, writing, and critical thinking. Class sessions will be a mix of lecture and discussion, with an emphasis on the latter. Each student will be asked to do an independent project under the supervision of the professor.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in discussions.
  2. Complete 3 examinations, two during the semester and a comprehensive final.
  3. Complete one individual project under the supervision of the professor.
  4. Complete impromptu quizzes and short papers over assigned reading.

Prerequisites

EN-40, any 200-level literature course.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A historical study of the social, political and philosophical roles of religion in America.

Course Content

This course is a historical study of the social, political and philosophical roles of religion in America.

Religious symbol systems exist as one means of integrating personal experience with collective human experience. Within a given civilization, religious systems are interdependent with other social systems in fulfilling this function. The study of religion involves examination of the religious symbol system and its integration with the civilization as a whole.

The specific study of religion in America must take cognizance of the reciprocity between the civilization and the religious symbol system. The shape of American religion was determined, in large part, by the nature of American civilization. The prevailing democratic spirit in America gave rise to a religious system characterized by voluntarism and pluralism. This course examines the substantive nature of religion in light of the formation of American civilization and the functional role of religion within American civilization.

The overall strategy of the course takes the form of an ongoing dialogue between the symbol system and the civilization. The course seeks an answer to the question, "How has American civilization affected and been affected by religion?"

Nature of Course

The course includes a wide variety of learning experiences. In addition to the traditional reading and writing, students make site visits to various churches, synagogues, temples, mosques, and meeting houses; view video materials; participate in mock debates; and work on case studies.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in discussions.
  2. Complete two examinations: a midterm and a final.
  3. Complete two research essays.
  4. Conduct an interview and write a report.
  5. Complete a critique of three articles.
  6. Participate in small-group book discussion.
  7. Complete an optional premium assignment.

Prerequisites

Students should have completed the lower division of the General Education curriculum or have the consent of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Analysis of the interrelational development of issues between twentieth century architecture and European/American civilization.

Course Content

The content in this course is designed to examine both the developments in western architecture and the attendant sociological milieu which contributed to these developments. Emphasis will be directed toward the interrelationships of technology, values of societies, and historical trends with the aesthetic concepts of architectural developments.

Architectural forms are a significant record and index of the sociological ferment of western twentieth century societies. In this course, there is an examination of architectural forms, the goals and logic of the architects, and the sociological issues which they attempted to address.

"Tools" of architectural, aesthetic analysis will be presented. This is to provide a basis upon which sound logical deductive and inductive conclusions can be made.

Nature of Course

Reading, writing, and examining of architectural examples (slides, reproductions, visits to actual buildings) will be equally stressed. Students will be expected to do all assigned reading, analysis, and synthesis, and to participate in field trips (mainly on campus and in the community--one field trip to a large metropolitan area (e.g., St. Louis). Class sessions will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, field trips, pop quizzes, reactions to videos, slides, and text illustrations.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Participate in discussions and classroom activities.
  3. Complete assigned papers.
  4. Construct a model in foam core board.
  5. Present a visual analysis of a piece of architecture in the midwest.
  6. Complete written examinations, including pop quizzes.

Basis for grading:

  1. Paper: Pre-modern Analysis (10%)
  2. Paper: Modern Analysis (10%)
  3. Paper: Comparative Analyses of 3 Architects and their works (10%)
  4. Visual Presentation (20%)
  5. Field Trip to City and Paper with color prints (10%)
  6. Mid-term test (10%)
  7. Model, white foam core board( 10%)
  8. Final Exam (20%)

Prerequisites

One course either in Artistic Expression or Development of a Major Civilization.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

North American Indians through settlement and expansion of the American frontier. Indian lifestyles today.

Course Content

The first part of the course examines what is known about the prehistoric origin of Native Americans, and gives a brief overview of the historic context of Indian-White relations. Part two examines the basic differences between food-getting and food-producing groups, and compares and contrasts the differences between tribal societies vs. industrialized groups. Part three focuses on specific Native American groups who historically practiced hunting/gathering forms of subsistence, and part four covers the agricultural societies. The final section looks at the nature of tribal level society as it relates to the indigenous populations of the world and the repeated culture clashes between these peoples and the industrialized societies of the West. The Native American situation is examined within this larger, global perspective.

Nature of Course

This course introduces students to Native American cultures with world views and ways of being which are fundamentally different from modern industrialized societies. It attempts to assist students in understanding the reasons for these differences, and allows the student to gain understanding various Native American cultures. The complex issues of Indian/White relations, both in the past and present, are examined within the larger global issues of "first contact," colonization, and colonialism throughout the modern world.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and actively participate in class discussions.
  2. Complete assigned readings.
  3. Satisfactorily complete all written assignments and make acceptable scores on examinations.
  4. Keep an open mind and enjoy the course.

Prerequisites

Social Systems or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of the relationship between humans and the built environment including social, psychological, economic and physical factors.

Course Content

  1. Physical perspectives on American housing forms
    1. Architectural styles
    2. Materials and components of production
    3. Production techniques
    4. Space analysis
    5. Other physical factors
    6. Relationship of physical factors to other aspects of housing
  2. Social/Psychological factors of the built environment
    1. Lifestyle, values, and needs
    2. Social class and social influences
    3. Psychological perspectives
    4. Special needs users
    5. Assessing housing behavior
    6. Relationship of social/psych factors to other aspects of housing
  3. Economic and legal considerations related to dwellings
    1. Tenure choices
    2. Affordability factors
    3. Financial options
    4. Legal aspects
    5. Relationship of economic/legal factors to other aspects of housing
  4. Public vs. private issues
    1. Housing assistance programs
    2. Urban planning
    3. Analysis of current issues in housing

Nature of Course

This course draws primarily from four General Education categories. In studying the fit between humans and the built environment, students will explore Behavioral Systems and Social Systems. Economic Systems and Political Systems will be addressed through units on the acquisition of housing and governmental influence on housing.

The main objective of this course is to explore all aspects of the housing industry from planning to production to distribution and use. Students develop an integrative approach to thinking through course assignments and class discussion which allow them the opportunity to analyze a variety of housing situations from many different perspectives, and then propose alternative solutions.

Student Expectations

  1. Participate in class discussion and activities.
  2. Complete all assigned readings and written work.
  3. Satisfactorily complete all exams and research paper.

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of courses in General Education categories of Behavioral, Social, Economic, and Political Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Examination of literary, political, and scientific achievements in 19th Century England.

Course Content

  1. Introduction
  2. Heroic Materialism
  3. The Survival of the Fittest
  4. Faith and Doubt
  5. Health and Medicine
  6. Getting at the Truth
  7. What was "Society"?
  8. The Empire
  9. The Aesthetic Movement

Nature of Course

The Victorian period is unique in that the literature must integrate a knowledge of science and political events. This was an age of great poets and novelists, and they wrote of public events. Reading Dickens requires a knowledge of economic conditions in England, reading Tennyson requires knowledge of the work of Lyell and Darwin, reading Arnold requires knowledge about British educational systems.

In fact, if a reader were to enjoy a month of reading only some Kipling, Browning, Clough, Rosetti, Meredith, and Wilde, that reader must also know something about British Colonial policy, Italian Renaissance art, psychology, theories on cosmic evolution, the Oxford movement in religion, pre-Raphaelite art, British penal systems, divorce laws, attitudes toward social deviants, and geology.

Perhaps there is no better example of the Integration of Knowledge in the Victorian mind than considering the works of Charles L. Dodgson, a mathematics professor at Oxford. His books include An Elementary Treatise on Determinants (1867), The Principles of Parliamentary Representation (1884), and, of course, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865).

Student Expectations

  1. Class attendance.
  2. Timely completion of all work including one classroom presentation and one research project.
  3. Satisfactory performance on examinations.

Prerequisites

Completion of Literary Expression course.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A critical analysis and examination of the normative concepts and ethical problems of modern political thought.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the origins and development of modern political thought and extensive analysis of several major political philosophical works by Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Marx. This particular course will analyze political theoretical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected interdisciplinary perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems).

Nature of Course

Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in political theory. Students will be encouraged to participate in active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to respond orally to such questions in the following session. This particular course will utilize a "Great Books" approach.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and to be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and to engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and respond orally to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a political philosophical issue or normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (10-15 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various political theories are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able critically to evaluate scholarly research in the discipline of political theory.

Prerequisites

Political Systems (PS-103 or PS-104), a course in Social Systems and a course in Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Studies the impact of culture on the business environment, including an on-site experience in the country/region of study.

Course Content

A brief overview of the culture of the country/region to be visited is presented, including history, geography, government, dress, housing, diet, lifestyle. An overview of the institutions being visited is studied. During a visit to the country/region, basic concepts are related to the observational experiences.

Nature of Course

This course consists of a literature review, theoretical concepts and an experiential component. The literature review will provide background to the student on the areas being studied as well as the institutions being visited. Theoretical concepts cover culture, intercultural awareness, cultural variation, and an overview of a particular culture to be visited.

The experiential component consists of on-site time spent in the selected culture making observational visits to institutions, cultural sites and participation in activities appropriate to the study of economic and cultural institutions.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend pre-departure classes and participate in classroom group activities.
  2. Prepare brief outlines relating to each of the institutions to be visited.
  3. Participate and interact satisfactorily in the cross-cultural field experience.
  4. Record in a personal journal observations, feelings, and insightful learning during the field experience.
  5. Complete essay final examination.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

The psychological, physiological, and social responses of people to the plants in their environment and the role they play in the improved physical and mental health of individuals as well as communities.

Course Content

This course is a study of the interactions between humans and the plant world. The course will point out the ways people interact with the plants in their environment and the role these plants play in improving the physical and mental health of individuals as well as the communities in which the individuals live. The main theme of the course will be to help one realize and understand that life without plants is impossible.

Nature of Course

The course will be divided into the following areas: (1) the role of plants in everyday life; (2) the use of plants to enhance community pride; the use of plants in the work place to reduce stress, increase productivity and cleanse the air; (4) the use of plants as therapy for the elderly, physically and mentally handicapped and those housed in prison; and to compare the plant/human relationship in developed and developing countries.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussions.
  2. Complete two one-hour exams and one (1) final exam.
  3. Complete out-of-classroom projects.
  4. Complete a term paper.
  5. Complete a group presentation.

Prerequisites

Social Systems and Artistic Expression or Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of Nonverbal Communication. Areas of study include body language, vocal cues, touching behavior, environmental factors, eye behavior, and physical appearance.

Course Content

  1. Orientation to Nonverbal Communication
  2. Approaches to the Study of Nonverbal Communication
  3. Environmental Factors in Human Communication
  4. Physical Appearance and Dress in Human Communication
  5. Territory, Personal Space, and Density in Human Communication
  6. Facial Expression and Eye Gazing Behavior in Human Communication
  7. Touching Behavior in Human Communication
  8. Vocal Behavior in Human Communication
  9. Nonverbal Communication in Various Settings
    1. Female-Male Interaction
    2. Social Communication
    3. Professional and Business Communication
    4. Intercultural Communication

Nature of Course

This course approaches the study of nonverbal communication from the disciplines of anthropology, communication, psychology, and sociology. The course represents a blend of social, scientific, and humanistic study. The historical roots of nonverbal research are traced and the numerous disciplinary approaches to the study of nonverbal are discussed. Overall, the importance of nonverbal communication in human society is explored. From the categories in the General Education program, this course draws from Artistic Expression, Oral Expression, Behavioral Systems and Social Systems.

Student Expectations

  1. Tests: There will be two exams during the course of the semester. The exams will cover assigned readings and class lectures. Each exam will be worth 20% of the final grade.
  2. Course papers and oral presentations: Each student will be expected to write three short papers (4-7 pages). At least one (more if time permits) of the papers must be presented orally to the class. Each paper will constitute approximately 10% of the final grade. The remaining 10% of the grade will be based on oral presentations and class participation.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education Perspectives of Artistic Expression, Oral Expression, Behavioral Systems, and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

How market, mixed, planned and developing economic systems are organized and function to obtain major economic, political and social goals.

Course Content

This course will emphasize the interrelationships between the political system of a country, its economic system and the historical development of both. Two hundred years ago, the political and the economic were united in the discipline of political economy. The works of Mill, Smith and Marx were writings on political economy. As the disciplines' knowledge increased, they split. While there are areas distinct to one and not the other, it has never been possible to look at a nation's economy without considering the political environment. In the words of George Stigler, "There can not be many things in man's political history more ancient than the endeavor of governments to direct economic affairs." (The Citizen and the State). Modern industrial countries tend to be judged both externally and internally in terms of economic performance. Therefore, no matter how insulated the political leaders and the political systems, they are vulnerable to economic conditions. Certainly this has been demonstrated by the changes in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Economic and political systems also exist in a historic context. For instance, different historical impacts such as the degree of dominance by Mongolian rulers may make it impossible for St. Petersburg and Moscow to follow the same post-Soviet route as Kiev. This course focuses on major industrialized and developing countries. It considers their economic objectives, measures their economic performances, and considers how these are influenced by their ideological, political, and historic perspectives.

Nature of Course

This course is both reading and writing intensive. There will be a textbook plus a number of assigned outside readings. Students are expected to read materials in advance and be prepared for class discussion. Class sessions combine lecture and discussion formats. All tests will be essay. Students are expected to demonstrate high quality writing skills on tests, the assigned paper and other written work. Students will need to spend at least six hours per week preparing assignments outside class.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussion.
  2. Satisfactorily complete three essay examinations.
  3. Satisfactorily complete a term paper on an assigned topic.
  4. Maintain a notebook of current events articles on topics assigned accompanied by written summaries of the articles.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower level Economic Systems and Political Systems courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A survey of social, economic and international forces that influence politics of Middle Eastern societies with particular emphasis on Egypt, Israel, Syria and Turkey.

Course Content

  1. Modernization and Political Development: A Theoretical Perspective
  2. The process of modernization and Change in the Middle East: An Historical Overview
  3. States, Beliefs and Ideologies: The Contradictions
  4. Competing Interests: Groups, Classes and Elites
  5. Institutional Infrastructure: Militaries, Bureaucracies and Legislatures
  6. The Arab-Israeli Conflict: Territorial Claims over the Holy Land
  7. Intra-Arab Conflicts: The Search for Authority and Unity
  8. The Politics of Oil and Energy: Paradox of Development

Nature of Course

The political and social scene of Middle Eastern societies is a strange mosaic where traditional rulers, revolutionary command councils, authoritarian military regimes and religious governing elites coexist side by side, where lavish wealth exists alongside poverty, where sociopolitical dissatisfaction sparks internal violence, and where interregional conflicts backed by religious and territorial claims threaten the stability of the region.

The answer to these questions is not simple and requires an interdisciplinary explanation. The politics of turbulent change and revolutionary upheaval in the Middle East is an outgrowth of dialectical clash between the forces of modernity and persisting strength of traditionalism. The primordial relationships and social structure are fastly losing their place, while the new value systems are yet to be formed. The subject matter will deal with dialectical relationship of socio-economic and political dynamics that shape the politics of the region. The material will be integrated in a manner that may lead the students to probe beyond simplistic generalizations and explanations.

Student Expectations

  1. Active, informed participation in class discussions.
  2. Satisfactory performance on examinations.
  3. Demonstration of critical thinking skills in all written assignments and oral presentations.
  4. Timely completion of all assignments.

Prerequisites

Political Science 103 or 104; and one course in Economic or Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Discussion of basic principles of public relations, publicity and propaganda used by business, political, and non-profit organizations to influence public opinion and communicate with their various publics.

Course Content

The course will focus on basic principles of public opinion management with emphasis on the management of public opinion.

Theories of communication effects will be discussed. Questions such as "Can we really be persuaded?" and "Is the media biased?" will be addressed. The attitude formation process and the attitude change process will be explored. Group influences on individual opinion and the concepts of public opinion, public relations, public affairs, and propaganda will be examined.

The concept of organizational "linkages" to various publics will be addressed. Other content areas in the opinion management process that will be covered are relations with media; employees; community; government; consumers; educational institutions; financial institutions; active publics; environmentalists; minorities; and special programs, such as promotion, fund raising and public communication campaigns.

Nature of Course

Students will be expected to read three texts and other selected literature in the field and discuss the material in class. Emphasis will be placed on class discussion and oral communication skills. Debate on issues will be encouraged. Selected case studies will be assigned to be read and discussed in class. A project emphasizing public opinion research will be required in addition to exams over the texts.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to participate actively in class discussions and satisfactorily complete class assignments. Exams over the text and assigned readings will be worth 60 percent of the student's grade. Written individual and team assignments will total 25 percent of the grade and class participation will account for 15 percent.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An examination of the ethical and social issues related to medicine, nursing, and biomedical research.

Course Content

The course examines a variety of ethical questions that arise in connection with contemporary medical practice. Ethical concepts and principles are introduced and applied to specific cases as they are described in popular, academic and professional literature.

The subject of medical ethics is inherently interdisciplinary, incorporating scientific knowledge and judgments about diagnosis, prognosis, treatment options, the quality of life, individual rights, autonomy, and social policy. A central theme of the course is that the scientific aspects of medical policies and decisions cannot be isolated from their social, religious, political and economic aspects.

Students will be introduced to some of the moral problems that arise in connection with the provision of health services. Emphasis is given to problems that arise in connection with new medical technology, the allocation of scarce medical resources, AIDS, the termination of life, informed consent, truthfulness, and confidentiality.

Nature of Course

A primary goal of the course is the development of the analytical skills necessary to evaluate medical policies and decisions from an ethical perspective. To this end emphasis will be placed on applying ethical concepts and principles to individual case studies. Classes are a combination of lecture and discussion, and students will be expected to do considerable reading outside of class. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in class discussion. During the semester students will be expected to prepare four separate case studies, and to demonstrate achievement on midterm and final exams. In addition, an 8-10 page interdisciplinary research paper is required.

Prerequisites

Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary study of the psychology of health and lifestyle management.

Course Content

The course will integrate knowledge and methods of investigation from the Behavioral and Social Systems areas. Students will compare and synthesize information from the disciplines of social sciences, health, and psychology in order to achieve a multidisciplinary perspective on health and lifestyle enhancement.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to enable students to make informed lifestyle choices as a result of attaining a broader understanding of the determinants of lifestyle, lifestyle consequences and completing a self-directed health behavior change project.

Student Expectations

  • Written exams (40%)
  • Health behavior change project (30%)
  • Assignments (30%)

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education requirements in the following categories: Behavioral Systems and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

The interdisciplinary study of the application of the critical thinking process to analyze economic, social, behavioral and political actions and interaction of consumers with the market and their use/consumption of those products and services acquired through the market exchange process.

Course Content

The main objective of the course will be to explore all aspects of the interactions of the consumer with the market. Students will develop an interdisciplinary approach to thinking through course assignments, discussions, informal debates and case study analysis which allow them the opportunity to explore issues from many different perspectives.

Nature of Course

Consumer science draws from the disciplines of economics, sociology, psychology, political science and others as consumer issues are addressed. Many literary works will be discussed also to provide a historical perspective on the consumer movement in the United States as well as its extension at the international level.

Student Expectations

  1. Participate in class discussion and activities.
  2. Complete all assigned reading, journal reviews and mini-assignments.
  3. Complete a term paper on a selected consumer issue.
  4. Satisfactory complete three tests and a final comprehensive exam.

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of courses in General Education categories of Economic, Political, Behavioral and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A critical historical analysis and philosophical examination of the origins and development of early American political thought articulated in the classic works of significant American political theorists.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the origins and development of early American political thought. Extensive analysis of several major selections by theorists have made a major contribution to early American political thought. This particular course will analyze political theoretical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected interdisciplinary perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems).

Nature of Course

Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in political theory. Students will be encouraged to participate in an active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to respond orally to such questions in the following session. This particular course will use a "Great Books" approach.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and to be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and to engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and respond orally to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a political philosophical issue or normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (10-15 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various political theories are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able critically to evaluate scholarly research in the discipline of political theory.

Prerequisites

Political Systems (PS103 or PS104), a course in Social Systems and a course in Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A critical examination and study of ancient and medieval political thought articulated in the original classic works of significant political philosophers.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the historical origins and intellectual development of classical Greek, Roman and medieval political philosophy. This particular course will analyze political theoretical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected interdisciplinary perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems).

Nature of Course

Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in political theory. Students will be encouraged to participate in an active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to respond orally to such questions in the following session. This particular course will use a "Great Books" approach.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and to be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and to engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and respond orally to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a political philosophical issue or normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (10-15 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various political theories are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able critically to evaluate scholarly research in the discipline of political theory.

Prerequisites

Political Systems (PS-103 or PS-104), a course in Social Systems and a course in Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Exploration of personal, institutional, and societal strategies for dealing with solid and hazardous wastes.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to the history of solid and hazardous waste disposal in the United States and current waste practices. Biogeochemical cycles will be considered as a natural model for the disposal and reuse of wastes. The various steps in the closed-loop recycling process will be covered and options and difficulties will be considered. Recycling of paper, glass, plastic, metals, petroleum, demolition wastes, and hazardous wastes will be discussed. Purchasing policies as waste-reduction and recycling-promotion strategies will be considered. Source reduction as a waste management strategy and composting, incineration, and landfilling as alternative disposal strategies will be discussed.

Nature of Course

The course will have two primary emphases, lecture-discussion and student activism. The lecture-discussion portion of the course is intended to inform and arouse concern about the growing environmental problems associated with wastes. The procedures, problems, and benefits to solutions of these problems will be considered. This portion of the course will involve lecture-discussions, and assigned readings.

The student activism aspect of the course will stress the critical role of concerned individual citizens in addressing the waste crisis. Students will be asked to examine their own disposal habits, purchasing practices, and use of toxic chemicals. Each student will have experience communicating about recycling and wastes to a community group.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend class, complete assigned readings, and participate in class discussions. Satisfactory performance on midterm and final essay exams is expected. Students will also conduct and submit the results of a personal waste audit and personal hazardous chemical audit. Students will identify a community group and deliver a short oral presentation to the group on waste management.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and completion of the Living Systems and Physical Systems General Education courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A critical historical analysis and philosophical examination of contemporary political thought and the origins and development of major political ideologies of the late 19th century and 20th century.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the origins and development of contemporary political thought. Extensive analysis of several major political philosophical works by theorists associated with particular contemporary political ideologies, such as democracy, liberalism, conservatism, socialism, Marxism, anarchism, fascism, and Nazism. Critical analysis of the normative concepts that stimulated these theorists: The nation-state, nationalism, political authority, political obligation, civil rights, natural rights, natural law, consent, social contract, liberty, equality, property, justice, political participation, representation, constitutionalism, monarchy, privacy, and individualism. This particular course will analyze political theoretical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected interdisciplinary perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems). This course is designed to demonstrate to students the linkage between diverse political philosophical systems of thought and various forms of social and political behavior, public policies, and political institutions.

Nature of Course

This course consists of a conceptual analysis of the most significant perennial political ideas and political theories of contemporary political thought. Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in political theory. Students will be encouraged to participate in active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to orally respond to such questions in the following session.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and to be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and to engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and respond orally to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a political philosophical issue or normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (10-15 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various political theories are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able critically to evaluate scholarly research in the discipline of political theory.

Prerequisites

Political Systems (PS-103 or PS-104), a course in Social Systems and a course in Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An analysis of the application of economic principles to all aspects of law including contract law, torts, and criminal law.

Course Content

This course examines the relationship between economics and law. Four core areas of law will be examined: property, contracts, torts and crime. The basic approach will be first to develop appropriate economic theory for each area of law and then show through various examples and applications, how the economic theory can improve our understanding of the various areas of law. In general, the economic theory which is used does not advance beyond the principles or introductory level.

Nature of Course

The reading assignments are moderate in amount, though some of the economic theory may require a little review if the student has not taken an introductory economics course recently. The student will be required to read court cases and to apply the economic approach to an analysis of the cases through short, written reports. There will also be class periods devoted to analysis and discussion of court cases in groups. The student, through these assignments and practice, will come to see that economists and lawyers tend to think alike in many (though not all) cases.

A variety of teaching methods will be employed, including lecture, discussion, and group work. Students will need to feel comfortable learning in a variety of environments.

Student Expectations

Attend class on a regular basis and complete all assignments. Expect to spend 4-6 hours per week outside of class completing assignments, reading for class, preparing for tests, etc. It is important to note that students will be expected to complete reading assignments before attending class. The final basis for student evaluation will be as follows:

  • Three essay exams (60%)
  • Homework/Case Studies (25%)
  • Term Project (15%)

Prerequisites

EC-101 or EC-215 and completion of Political Systems component.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Investigation of the theories, concepts and methodologies employed in the scientific study of the mind from 1650 to the present.

Course Content

The course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the development of the science of the mind from the 17th century to the present day. Topics covered will be the a priori theorizing of René Descartes, the analysis of consciousness of William James, the investigation of the unconscious by Sigmund Freud, the experimental methods developed by B. F. Skinner, the cognitive-development theories of Jean Piaget and Lawrence Kohlberg, the information-processing models of contemporary cognitive science and artificial intelligence, and the evolutionary biology of E. O. Wilson. The course will conclude with an examination of the problem of consciousness and why it is thought to present a barrier to the scientific study of the mind.

The views of each major figure will be studied from different points of view, e.g., (a) whether they are compatible with a scientific psychology, (b) whether they are compatible with our conception of ourselves as moral agents, (c) whether they can accommodate the mentalistic framework which we use to understand ourselves, (d) whether they present scientifically acceptable hypotheses, (e) whether they can account for novelty and purpose in human behavior, (f) whether their theories of learning, development and reinforcement are compatible with human values.

Nature of Course

The course combines lecture and discussion of assigned texts. Students will be expected to do a good deal of reading and study outside of class, and should be prepared to discuss and apply the readings to hypothetical, experimental and clinical situations. Students should devote five to six hours per week to this course outside the classroom. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, participate in class discussion, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final exams. Students should also expect to write one or more discussion papers, and do independent research leading to the completion of a research paper.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education curriculum, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Investigation and analysis of some of the main concepts, issues and problems in moral psychology or character development.

Course Content

Moral psychology is the study of the nature, capacities and norms of evaluation appropriate for individuals considered as moral agents. It also seeks to learn how the evaluative study of character can be integrated with a scientific knowledge of human nature. Thus virtues and vices are understood, on the one hand, as qualities of character that lead to the performance of good or harmful actions. On the other hand, they are understood as dispositions whose development and expression is influenced by natural endowment, teaching, example and environmental conditions. Many basic human motives can be characterized as virtues or vices to the extent that they are effective in causing or determining behavior, e.g.benevolence, truthfulness and fairness on the one hand, selfishness, indifference and malevolence on the other. The course investigates the development, modification, expression and evaluation of such motives, together with their implications for the moral assessment of persons and their characters. Classical, traditional and contemporary views of human nature are considered for their ability to reflect ideals of character and to justify the judgment, assessment and shaping of character.

Nature of Course

The course combines lecture and discussion of assigned texts. Students are expected to do a good deal of reading and study outside of class, and should be prepared to discuss and apply the readings to historical, fictional and hypothetical situations. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, participate in class discussion, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final exams. Students should also expect to write one or more discussion papers, and do independent research leading to the completion of a research paper.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education curriculum, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A study of the ethical questions that arise in modern mass media with emphasis on journalism, advertising and entertainment.

Course Content

This course examines the ethical issues that arise in modern mass media with specific emphasis on journalism, advertising and entertainment. The course begins with an introduction to ethical theory, a set of frameworks within which we make and justify ethical judgments. Those theories are then used to evaluate problems in the three content areas mentioned above. In addition to ethical theories, economic, social and political aspects of media issues are examined. Problems in media ethics are polycentric, that is, they have many dimensions. One of the goals of the course is to demonstrate how complex the issues are and how reasonable people often differ about the best resolution of them.

Nature of Course

Media Ethics is a course in applied ethical theory and, as such, must be interdisciplinary. This course integrates material from art theory (artistic expression), ethical theory (behavioral systems), economics (economic systems), law and politics (political systems), and business and social science (social systems). Discussions of the business pressures faced by editors relate moral theory, journalistic standards, economics and business. For example, how should the editor of a magazine devoted to women and women's issues respond to cigarette ads directed at women or to advertisers who demand "tie-in" articles in order to place ads in a magazine? The experience of Ms. Magazine is directly relevant here. Similarly, discussions of pornography and violence in the entertainment industry definitions and concepts of art, erotica, pornography and obscenity (artistic expression), ethical theories (behavioral systems), constitutional issues of free expression and other regulations (political systems) and social scientific research on the effect of pornography on society (social systems).

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly (be prepared to be called on in class).
  2. Participate in class discussions.
  3. Complete seven (7) written case summary reports.
  4. Prepare two (2) papers, one analytical, the other expository.
  5. Complete a mid-term and final examination (essay exam style).

Prerequisites

Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Government regulation of business in the United States with emphasis on differing economic and political perspectives concerning such regulation.

Course Content

The course will study various types of government regulation and consider efficiency based on the economist's model as opposed to the political reality of the actual regulatory legislation and process. In addition to developing economic models for regulation, the views of political scientists regarding the limitations of economic models will be considered. Subsequently, the course will look at various types of business regulation imposed by government. After studying the regulation itself as well as the political and historic context in which it developed, an attempt will be made to evaluate the regulatory results both from an economic viewpoint and a broader societal view. Most government intervention in the market fails to meet the economic criteria for efficiency; therefore, its justification and continuing popularity must be sought in the political realm. However, some types of regulation are obviously more efficient than others and at the same time meet the equity concerns of society. The course will attempt to assist the student in developing a framework for evaluating government intervention in terms of both economic efficiency and political realities.

Nature of Course

This course is both reading and writing intensive. There will be a textbook, a number of outside readings and ten or more homework assignments. Students are expected to read materials and prepare homework in advance. There may be occasional pop quizzes on assigned materials. A variety of teaching methods will be used but the class will focus on discussion of the homework and other assigned materials. All tests will be essay. Students are expected to demonstrate high quality writing skills on tests, the assigned paper, and other written work. Students will need to spend at least six hours weekly preparing assignments outside class.

Student Expectations

  1. Advance preparation of all assigned material.
  2. Active classroom participation.
  3. Satisfactory performance on three essay tests, ten or more homework assignments and pop quizzes.
  4. Satisfactory completion of a term paper on an assigned topic and oral presentation based on the paper.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower level Economic Systems and Political Systems courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of earthquakes: their causes, location, interaction with surface material and their effects on human society. The role of the public in seismic safety is examined in terms of both structural and nonstructural hazards in buildings as well as the need for earthquake preparedness.

Course Content

This course focuses on the study of earthquakes and the hazards they present to society. The initial portion of the course is the development of the background necessary to understand why earthquakes happen and where they are most likely to take place. All causes of earthquakes are discussed. The course also discusses seismic waves and how they interact with the surface and subsurface in an aim to demonstrate what the cause of damage to structures are during an earthquake as well as the utilization of the seismic wave to determine location and magnitude of the earthquake. The measurement of earthquake is discussed in both terms of seismic safety both structurally and non-structurally in an attempt to make the student more aware of their surroundings. The seismic risk for this region, the New Madrid Seismic Zone, is dealt with in detail as well as seismic zones throughout the United States.

Nature of Course

Depending on the instructor, the course is either totally lecture based with discussions and in-class projects or web assisted with lecture discussions and in-class projects. There will be reading assignments in prescribed text, handouts and reserved materials in Kent Library in preparation for lectures. There will be term projects and the nature of these projects will be up to the discretion of the instructor.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend all class meetings, complete all assignments, and to perform satisfactorily on all examinations. They are expected to participate in classroom oral presentations and discussions. Full participation in the term project (capstone project) is mandatory.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education Physical and Social Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Reading and evaluating the geologic record of biologic and geologic events, with chronicle of life and earth interaction through time.

Course Content

The course will consist of two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. Topics to be examined include: past environmental interpretation from fossils and sedimentary rocks; relative and absolute age dating of rocks; paleontology; techniques in fossil recognition and interpretation; evolution; modes of fossil preservation; stratigraphy; plate tectonics; and life and geologic events, and their interrelationships, from the beginning of life on earth to the modern day.

Nature of Course

The first seven weeks of lecture, and all labs, are devoted to teaching techniques for interpretation of past living and physical systems from data preserved in the rock record. The second eight weeks of lecture illustrate the interaction of physical and living systems throughout geologic time, by way of a chronicle of the past 3.5 billion years of life and geologic events. The intent of the course is to teach techniques for reading the geologic record of life and environments past, and to instill a knowledge of and appreciation for the geologic record of global change.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend and participate in all lecture and lab activities, including class discussion.
  2. Complete all labs and the final lab project (approximately 5 pages, interpretation of a past environment/ecosystem from a sedimentary rock outcrop).
  3. Perform acceptably on all exams.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of major European films and film makers in the context of French, German, and Spanish cultures.

Course Content

The course includes a study of the art and practice of film making in Europe, concentrating on French, German, and Spanish cinema. The particular emphasis of the course is the expression of national and linguistic cultures in the films and a comparison between European and American film making.

Critical analysis of film in general is combined with the identification and explanation of cultural particularities in representative French, German, and Spanish films. An historical perspective of the development of the film industry in Europe and its relationship to major artistic movements of the twentieth century are also presented. Readings, viewings, and research projects will allow students to investigate in greater detail one particular aspect of European film.

The course is designed for both foreign language majors and non-majors. It does not count toward the requirements of foreign language degrees, except as a UI 300-level course fulfilling the degree requirements in General Education; in fact, the emphasis is on an in-depth analysis of film, film history, and world-famous European directors, not on language as such. All textbook materials and in-class work are in English and all films viewed are subtitled in English. There is an extensive body of critical work available in Kent Library and through other sources in English.

Nature of Course

This course has a lecture/discussion format, for which students need to complete readings from the textbook and attend weekly viewings of the films under discussion. The course includes both the basic technical and critical tools of film analysis, the history of cinema in Europe, and the discussion of examples from major European directors.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to participate actively in all class activities, including class meetings, viewing of films, discussions, and class projects. In addition, each student will complete a research project on a specific aspect of European cinema in consultation with the instructor.

The course includes lectures, discussions, and tests on assigned material, reports on film viewings, and reports to the class of the progress of the major research project. The exams include objective question/answer (film terms, identification of directors/trends/ themes), short essay questions (e.g., characteristics of a movement such as German expressionism), and one longer essay (e.g., an analysis of the elements of a particular film).

Prerequisites

Completion of Artistic Expression, Oral Expression, Written Expression, Literary Expression, and Development of a Major Civilization in the General Education Core Curriculum or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A historical investigation of American mass media and the philosophies and concepts underlying their development from colonial to present times.

Course Content

This course examines American mass media development and history as a product of the social, cultural, historical, and political environment unique to America. The course incorporates analysis and discussion of significant events, personalities, and issues affecting mass media's development as well as its role in reporting those events. The course outline is as follows:

  1. The Media in Early America
    1. British Roots of the Colonial Press
    2. Colonial, Revolutionary, and Party Presses
    3. The Philosophy of Press Freedom
    4. Penny Press and Early Magazines
  2. The Media in an Expanding Nation
    1. Sectional, Abolition, and Civil War Presses
    2. The Frontier Press and Manifest Destiny
    3. The Press and Industrial America
    4. New Journalism, Pulitzer, Hearst, and Ochs
    5. Reform Journalism: The Muckrakers
  3. The Media in a Modern World
    1. The Film Industry
    2. Radio
    3. Advertising
    4. Magazines
    5. Public Relations
    6. Television
    7. Newspapers
    8. Internet
    9. Satellites

Nature of Course

This course is taught primarily through the lecture/discussion methods. Emphasis throughout the course is placed on weaving the mass media's growth and changes into the fabric of the nation's development as a democracy and as a diverse and culturally-rich society. Whenever possible, the course utilizes primary sources (newspapers, magazines, audio and videotapes) from the periods and events under investigation to encourage students to critically evaluate the media in their proper context. Students engage in historical research using primary and secondary sources for some assignments.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Complete all of the assignments.
  3. Participate actively in group activities.
  4. Complete research assignments using primary and secondary research.
  5. Complete all regularly scheduled exams, including the final exam.

Prerequisites

Completion of 45 hours.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

The musical theatre genre is traced via close examination of its origins, evolution, and maturation as a living, contemporary art form.

Course Content

This is a survey course that traces the early European and early American influences that directly effect the development of this truly American art form known today as musical theatre. Areas studied in the survey of musical theatre will include origins, beginnings (1866), the formative years (1900-1927), developmental stages (1927-1943), the golden years (1943-1960), searching for new directions (1960 onwards), the mega-musicals of the 1970s and 1980s, and the new composers (1990-present). Attention will also be paid to the elements of the musical (the libretto, the lyrics, the musical score, orchestrations) and the artists working in musical theatre (producers/directors/ choreographers, actors/singers/dancers, and the design team).

Nature of Course

This course incorporates the developmental study of musical theatre (theatre, music, dance, and the visual arts) as an art from with its wide range of distinctive genres. A multitude of social and historical influences have had a profound impact on its development. The musical theatre form will not only be examined in the context of the society which produced it, but also how the genre evolved and developed to integrate all of the elements of the musical into a contemporary art form.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class on a regular basis.
  2. Read all text and supplemental readings in a timely manner.
  3. Participate in class discussions and presentations.
  4. View and write critiques on live and video performances of musical theatre.
  5. Satisfactorily complete a written semester research paper on an aspect of the course content.
  6. Demonstrate both knowledge and understanding of subject matter on two tests, a comprehensive final exam, and semester project/presentation.

Prerequisites

TH-100 Theatre Appreciation, or MU-182 Music: An Artistic Expression, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Introduction to fundamental scientific factors that affect human and ecosystem health, focusing on disease prevention/control and enhancing environmental quality.

Course Content

Environmental health requires the integration of knowledge from a variety of disciplines. For example, federal, state, and local environmental health programs must address issues associated with solid waste, hazardous waste, hazardous waste, sewage treatment and disposal, air pollution, water pollution, industrial/occupational health, and public health concerns. All of these issues require the consideration of biological, chemical, geological, sociopolitical, psychological, psychological, industrial, business, and educational factors.

Nature of Course

Each topic area will integrate knowledge from the scientific and social science disciplines through textbook readings, internet material gathering and class discussion and student group presentations.

In-class periods will be devoted to topic lectures and discussions by the instructor and human impacts resulting in environmental health impacts guided by the instructor.

Student Expectations

Attendance at all class meetings, participation in class discussions, completion of all papers and group presentations and satisfactory performance on examinations are expected of the students in the course.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and the Living Systems (any BI or BS course) and Physical Systems General Education courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Introduction to the formulation and provisions of environmental regulations and policies with an emphasis on major federal legislative acts.

Course Content

Environmental law is a system of regulations, statutes, policy negotiation, case-specific interpretations and guidelines that are interrelated. Students are introduced to the activities associated with environmental public policy formation, interpretation, implementation and enforcement strategies that are grounded in scientific inquiry and occurs within cultural, economic, social, and political contexts. Specific topics include hazardous waste regulation, endangered species protection, clean air and clean water regulation and environmental assessment requirements.

Nature of Course

Each topic area will integrate knowledge from scientific and social study disciplines through textbook readings, federal and state regulation discussions, case-law interpretation and student group discussions. Students will present opposing case arguments during class periods.

In-class periods will be devoted to topic lectures by the instructor and case-law interpretations guided by the instructor.

Student Expectations

Attendance at all class meetings, participation in case-law discussions, completion of written reports and papers, and satisfactory performance on examinations is expected of the students in the course.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and the Living Systems (any BI or BS course) and Physical Systems General Education courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course will examine the Romantic Movement through an in-depth study of eight masterpieces of Romantic music in the context of their times.

Course Content

Romantic music reflected the peculiarly rich and turbulent era from which it sprang. Framed around the consideration of eight musical landmarks (ranging from the Trout Quintet by Franz Schubert, through works of Schumann, Wagner, Berlioz, Wagner and Bruckner, to the Elgar Cello Concerto), the course will encompass topics such as the role of women in the nineteenth century, the theories of Charles Darwin, the pictures of J.M.W. Turner, the Gothic Revival, the rise of Nationalism, the philosophy of Nietzsche, and the coming of the First World War.

The creative output of Romantic Composers has assumed a centrality in our current perception as to what music should be. In The Age of Romanticism the student will gain deeper comprehension of the cultural history and artistic expressions of the nineteenth century, as well as the epoch to follow.

Nature of Course

This course combines the disciplines of musicology and cultural history in investigating a specific repertoire of music. In addition, the course will address the subject from the perspective of the Development of a Major Civilization, with particular emphasis on the cultural atmosphere of the period under scrutiny. Students will undertake source readings in poetry, literature, philosophy, art criticism and so forth. Guest performers and presenters will visit the class to illumine the era and encourage students to make connections between the music under consideration and the world in which it appeared.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate actively in class discussions, analysis, and respond to the works under scrutiny.
  2. Successfully undertake dual oral/written presentations on various assigned topics for each set work.
  3. Read assigned literature and pursue active listening exercises surrounding the eight set works.
  4. Perform satisfactorily on all examinations.

Prerequisites

MH-251 and MH-252; or MU-181 or MU-182 or by permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course will examine the phenomenon of Modernism in music and culture through the study of thirteen masterpieces of music in the context of their time.

Course Content

Modernist music reflects the historical, technological, and social movements of its time. Modernism in music presents a study in extremes, with the works of many early modernist composers (e.g. Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky) holding a central place in the canon, while the works of later modernists (e.g. Luciano Berio, Charles Wuorinen) have not gained widespread acceptance.

In The Age of Modernism the student will gain a deeper comprehension of the schism that has divorced contemporary high culture from popular culture. The cultural, social and political history of the era will be illuminated by consideration of issues/works such as the First World War, Surrealism and Dada, the role of the CIA in the arts during the Cold War, Abstract Expressionism, the Beat Generation, Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood, the Reggio-Glass film Koyaanisqatsi and so forth.

Nature of Course

This course combines the disciplines of musicology and cultural history. Music criticism which integrates musical analysis with historical/biographical details will lead to an aesthetic appreciation for the repertoire under consideration. Concurrent with the musical approach (Artistic Expression), this course will study the Modernist movement through the perspective of the Development of a Major Civilization. Several teaching strategies will foster this interdisciplinary approach. Students will undertake source readings (poetry, drama, literature, art analysis, etc.). Presenters and guest performers specializing in aesthetic or historical features of the twentieth century will visit the class. In-class activities will make links between the music under consideration and the world in which it appeared.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate actively in class discussions, analysis, and respond to the works under scrutiny.
  2. Successfully undertake dual oral/written presentations on various assigned topics for each set work.
  3. Read assigned literature and pursue active listening exercises surrounding the eight set works.
  4. Perform satisfactorily on all examinations.

Prerequisites

MM-203 and MM-207; MU-181 or MU-182 or by permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course will investigate the development of music between 1600-1750 and its place in the culture of Western Europe.

Course Content

The Baroque Era is the beginning of what musicians call the Common Practice Period. The music of this period is analyzed, performed, and heard on a regular basis today and much of it is familiar and comfortable to students and audiences. Many students recognize ideas, values, and arts from this period that sound, look, and feel "modern." Social and political structures, economic systems, philosophical and theological arguments, and the artistic artifacts of this period exert considerable influence on students and their world today. Students taking this course will be introduced to these and other historical/cultural considerations, using music of the period as entry. By studying this music, the cultural developments of these eras, and their relationships, students will have the chance to understand the development of their world from the perspectives of Artistic Expression and Development of a Major Civilization.

Nature of Course

The semester will begin with a brief review of the musical foundations of the 16th Century. General topic areas include Monody, Stile Secondo and the Invention of the Opera; Baroque Instrumental Music; and High Baroque Vocal Music. The final portion of the course will be devoted to an in-depth investigation of a Baroque master. Class sessions will consist of lectures and listening sessions as well as discussions and student presentations based on readings, research, and outside-of-class listening. Students will do comparative score analysis as well as edit works from facsimiles of original editions and manuscripts. In addition to reading the textbooks, students will be required to read original sources (in translation) to better understand the cultural history of the period. Students will be evaluated on four tests, two group projects, and a final research paper and presentation.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate actively in class discussions, analysis, and listening projects.
  2. Complete all reading, listening, and score study assignments according to schedule on syllabus.
  3. Complete all writing assignments, including analysis papers and classroom presentations, in a timely manner.
  4. Perform satisfactorily on all examinations.
  5. Produce a culminating term paper and present an oral report on the results of the term paper. The paper and presentation will be completed according to guidelines issued for the project.

Prerequisites

MH-251 and MH-252 or MU-181 and MU-182 or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An examination of Beethoven's life and music, and the cultural context in which it developed.

Course Content

This course is an interdisciplinary investigation into the life and music of Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the rich and tumultuous era in which he lived. Beethoven's life and his musical masterworks will be studied in detail, with selections from all genres (song, choral, orchestral, chamber music, piano) represented. Such masterworks as Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, Missa Solemnis, Moonlight Sonata, Fidelio, and the Ninth Symphony will be studied in detail, along with the biographical incidents in Beethoven's life that gave rise to these compositions. In addition, the cultural, social, and political history of the era will be fleshed out with discussions, readings, and interactive sessions devoted to the poetry (Goethe, Byron, Wordsworth), art (Goya, Turner), and political history (French Revolution, Napoleon, Waterloo) of the era. The course content will illuminate the development of Western European history at a crucial juncture: the era of revolution; and it will detail the changing intellectual climate as the Age of Enlightenment gives way to the Age of Romanticism. Central to these discussions will be the life and work of one great artist, Beethoven, whose creative genius helped shape the course of human history.

Nature of Course

This course will study Beethoven's music in a context-oriented approach. Analysis of his music will be undertaken under a broad spectrum of procedures, including formal analysis, textual analysis (for choral and song composition), autobiographical influences, performing practices, and expressive content. Analysis of the era in which he lived will be undertaken through lecture, discussions, interactive sessions, role playing, poetry readings, plays, and so forth. For instance, students will hear demonstrations of the changing sound of woodwind instruments in Beethoven's day, and will re-enact the Battle of Waterloo. Class discussions on such topics as Beethoven's revolutionary musical ideas, the emerging poetry of Romanticism, and the changing sound of the piano will take place.

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to attend class regularly and to participate actively in class discussions.
  2. Students are expected to perform satisfactorily on all examinations.
  3. Students are expected to complete all class assignments, including listening, reading, and writing assignments.
  4. Students are expected to complete a term paper and accompanying oral presentation that demonstrates original research on a selected aspect of the Age of Beethoven.

Prerequisites

MM-203 and MM-207; or MU-181 or MU-182 or by permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course will investigate the development of music between 900 and 1600 and its place in the culture of Western Europe.

Course Content

The events and artifacts of the 700 years considered in this course laid many of the foundations for what became the modern western world. The religions, values, social and political structures, economic systems, and arts that developed in Western Europe at this time continue to have direct impacts on the lives of today's students. Students will be introduced to these and other historical/cultural considerations, using music of the period as entry. By studying this music, the cultural developments of these eras, and their relationships, students will have the chance to understand the development of their world from the perspectives of Artistic Expression and Development of a Major Civilization.

Nature of Course

The semester will be roughly divided into four sections in which the class will consider the music and culture of the Early Middle Ages (Romanesque, 500-1100), Ars Antiqua & Ars Nova (1100-1400) Early Renaissance (1400-1520), and High Renaissance (1520-1600). Class sessions will consist of lectures and listening sessions as well as discussions and student presentation based on readings, research, and outside-of-class listening. Students will do comparative score analysis as well as transcriptions from facsimiles of original manuscripts. In addition to reading the textbooks, students will be required to read original sources (in translation) to better understand the cultural history of the period. Students will be evaluated on four tests, two group projects, and a final research paper and presentation.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate actively in class discussions, analysis, and listening projects.
  2. Complete all reading, listening, and score study assignments according to schedule on syllabus.
  3. Complete all writing assignments, including analysis papers and classroom presentations, in a timely manner.
  4. Perform satisfactorily on all examinations.
  5. Produce a culminating term paper and present an oral report on the results of the term paper. The paper and presentation will be completed according to guidelines issued for the project.

Prerequisites

MH-251 and MH-252 or MU-181 and MU-182 or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2783
univstudies@semo.edu
Memorial Hall 210
General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 4180
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701