Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

The impact of crop production and utilization on society, including the science of food-crop production, horticulture and pasture management.

Course Content

The first part (approximately one third) of the course presents the study of concepts, values, and vocabulary necessary for understanding Cultural Anthropology as a discipline. The second part focuses on specific cultural topics of interest to anthropologists, including human language, kinship, marriage and family structures, food procurement and subsistence systems, religion and worldview, art, and the effects of globalization on cultures.

Nature of Course

The course presents anthropology as one particular means of researching the social and material world around us, with a specific focus on analysis of human social behavior and the cultural underpinnings of social organization. While the course regards human social behavior as a unifying characteristic of the species, it uses specific beliefs and behaviors from cultures around the world to exemplify the extensive variety and possibilities of cultural expression. Students should gain a knowledge of the basic techniques, concepts and vocabulary used by cultural anthropologists as well as an appreciation for themselves and others as cultural beings.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend all class sessions and activities, participate fully in class discussions in a way that demonstrates their preparation and understanding of the material, submit assigned work on time, and to seek help and guidance from instructor and peer mentors (advanced undergraduate students) as provided.
Eight two-week units are covered in the course, each with its own quiz, at least one out-of-class film viewing and assigned worksheet, and accompanying exercises (some online, some hardcopy or brief in-class presentation). A final comprehensive essay is submitted during finals week.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Development and fundamentals of the livestock industry including breeds, physiology, nutrition and products of sheep, cattle, horses, poultry and Swine.

Course Content

Agricultural animals are an essential part of the living systems dynamics. They provide food and fiber that feeds and clothes the world. Understanding how these animals are used in the United States; their advantages and disadvantages, how they are fed, cared for and reproduce is essential to the agricultural industry. Their wide variety of uses and advantages contributes to the many uses of animal agriculture worldwide.

Nature of Course

N/A

Student Expectations

Students will be evaluated on their performance in several ways:

  1. Students are expected to participate in their groups when verbal or written problems are presented in class.
  2. Tests (4 and a final) are designed to evaluate their competency and understanding of the biological principles of animal growth and development, as well as the history, marketing and utilization of agricultural products
  3. Students will work in groups to write a 3 - 5 page term paper on an animal and their importance and value to current day life. Adherence to the guidelines for writing the paper, are a must. This includes writing the paper using MLA format, covering the subject assigned, and doing so with proper grammar, sentence, paragraph, and paper structure.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

 &

Catalog Description

An introduction to principles of evolution and ecology of organisms through application of the scientific method

Course Content

 

Nature of Course

Three lectures and one two-hour lab

Student Expectations

  1.  

Prerequisites

 

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

4

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Emphasis on human cell, tissue, and organ system function. Discussions focus on a systems approach to human health and disease. Does not count on any major or minor in Biology Department.

Course Content

Although the emphasis of this course is on the physiological functions of human organ systems, effort will be made to show the interrelationship among biological, psychological and social functions of the human organism. Using a systems approach to frame the interaction among the various levels of human systems, from cellular to community, students will learn how changes at one level of a system influence changes at other levels. Biological principles of cell, tissue and organ systems will be reviewed in the context of how they may affect, or be affected by, psychological and social behavior. Examples will include demonstrating how biological communication via hormonal and nervous system signals initiates a stimulus-response cycle not limited to biological functions, but in tandem with psychological and social stimuli. Study of human diseases will allow students to explore how biological processes, interacting with psychological and social factors, contribute to human health and disease.

Nature of Course

Organ systems and their functions are presented by lecture, with supplementary web materials, and through group or individual learning activities. A portion of class periods will be devoted to the analysis of current events, as reported in various news media, within a biological context. Students are expected to participate in this analysis and share their findings within a small or large group setting.

Student Expectations

Exams will account for approximately 50% of the course grade. These exams will be a combination of objective and short answer questions. Participation in group and individual learning activities will determine the remaining 50% of the course grade.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Discussion of biological principles with application to environmental issues.

Course Content

Environmental Biology introduces students to basic biological principles in the context of pertinent environmental issues. These principles will primarily concern ecological topics such as energy flow, population growth, nutrient cycling, and the interactions between living organisms and their environment. In addition, the course will introduce students to the process of science, the concept of scientific authority, and the role of scientists in forming environmental policy. The impact of human activity on biological systems will be considered under the topics of: overpopulation and world hunger, energy and mineral resources, water resources and pollution, biological diversity, air pollution and atmospheric alterations, and wastes and hazardous chemicals.

Nature of Course

The course will consist of three 50-minute sessions per week. One time commitment outside of the regularly scheduled class period will be required. A mixture of teaching strategies will be employed, including lecture, discussion, videotapes, laboratory experiments, and field trips.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend and participate in all class activities including lectures, laboratory experiments, video summaries, small group discussion/debate, class presentations, field trips, examinations, and library investigation of an environmental issue. Student performance will be assessed on the basis of written assignments, examinations, and class participation.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

 &

Catalog Description

Biological processes will be used to provide experience in scientific investigation and discussion of implications and limitations.

Course Content

 

Nature of Course

One two-hour discussion/recitation; one two-hour lab

Student Expectations

  1.  

Prerequisites

 

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

 &

Catalog Description

To acquaint the students with and help them to understand some of the fundamental biological processes and problems which confront living organisms.

Course Content

 

Nature of Course

 

Student Expectations

  1.  

Prerequisites

 

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Using scientific reasoning and evidence from various biological disciplines to test hypotheses about the common ancestry of organisms. Three one-hour lectures.

Course Content

This course explores evidence relating to the common ancestry of organisms on Earth. It is divided into a series of units, covering the process of science, comparative study of skeletons of vertebrates, fossil evidence, the genetic code, and comparative study of molecular biology of organisms.

Nature of Course

Students proceed by developing their own hypotheses about the origin and relatedness of organisms. These hypotheses are tested against anatomical and molecular evidence in a series of units. Student record their hypotheses, predictions, results, and conclusions, along with their reasoning processes, in ongoing journal entries during the course. In the process the students are exposed to a variety of types of biological evidence along with the tools for locating and analyzing it, and gain experience in application of scientific reasoning to a problem.

Student Expectations

Attend all classes, participate in all class activities, and satisfactorily complete all assignments and examinations.

Prerequisites

Must be EN100 eligible.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

 &

Catalog Description

This course applies scientific thought to structure, function, energetics and ecology of living systems.

Course Content

 

Nature of Course

Two lectures, one two-hour lab

Student Expectations

  1.  

Prerequisites

BS 118

Corequisites

 

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

This course examines, analyzes, and evaluates the relationships between the science of nutrition, health, and well being.

Course Content

This course is designed to provide a fundamental knowledge of the science of nutrition. The course provides the student with skills to critically evaluate the role of nutrition to health and to apply that knowledge to one's lifestyle. This study leads to an appreciation for the methods of scientific reasoning and research in understanding a living system.

Nature of Course

The teaching format will combine lecture and discussion styles in the classroom. Frequent activities will require critical thinking and application of knowledge in order to better equip the student to make informed food and lifestyle choices. Students will be asked to read the text and to locate and read relevant professional and popular articles which relate to the subject matter. Evidence of critical thinking and effective communication will be emphasized.

Student Expectations

A weekly activity will provide the student an opportunity to communicate knowledge and understanding of the subject. Four unit tests, including a final exam will be objective in nature. Each student will use computer technology to analyze their dietary intake. Reading and writing assignments require reading from current sources.

Grades for the course are based on performance on two exams and a final exam, three short papers, one oral presentation, and participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2207
generaleducation@semo.edu
Academic Hall 132

General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 3400
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701