Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Designed to develop ability to read French literary texts; to acquaint students with a selection of major French authors; to introduce basic concepts of literary analysis; to increase students' ability to speak and understand French through class discussions in French.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had exceptional high school preparation (4-5 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 9 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

The course begins with a selection of short stories by important French, Belgian, Canadian or African authors. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and summarizing narrative structures.

Students read L'Etranger or another important French novel in its entirety. They discuss in French the elements of structure, character, theme, and style.

Students become acquainted with the principles of French versification and with dramatic literature by reading a selection of French poems and scenes from plays of major authors.

Nature of Course

This course acquaints students with basic strategies for approaching French literature and develops the vocabulary needed to read French texts with an increasing degree of skill and ease. Students become acquainted with French literary style and terms of literary analysis.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all reading assignments and to participate in class discussions of the readings. Regular quizzes and exams test students' ability to read and understand French literary texts.

Prerequisites

FR-200 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Designed to develop ability to read German literary texts; to acquaint students with a selection of major German authors; to introduce basic concepts of literary analysis; to increase students' ability to speak and understand German through class discussions in German.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had exceptional high school preparation (4-5 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 9 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

The course begins with a selection of short stories by important German, Swiss or Austrian authors. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and summarizing narrative structures.

Students read short German prose works in their entirety and discuss in German the elements of structure, character, theme, and style.

Students become acquainted with the principles of German versification and with dramatic literature by reading a selection of German poems and scenes from plays of major authors.

Nature of Course

This course acquaints students with basic strategies for approaching German literature and develops the vocabulary needed to read German texts with an increasing degree of skill and ease. Students become acquainted with German literary style and terms of literary analysis.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all reading assignments and to participate in class discussions of the readings. Regular quizzes and exams test students' ability to read and understand German literary texts.

Prerequisites

GN-200 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A study of short stories and novels by significant writers past and present.

Course Content

This course examines the function of the basic elements of fiction and emphasizes the fictional treatment of universal themes such as the individual and society, initiation and maturation, love and conflict, and alienation and the search for faith, in approximately 30 to 40 short stories and one or two novels or novellas. For each thematic unit, students are assigned several readings and some research into pertinent criticism.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to improve the ability of students to read, interpret, talk, and write about fiction competently and confidently. Class work involves a combination of lecture-discussion, small group discussions, reports, in and out-of-class writing, and two or more examinations requiring both objective and interpretive responses. Out-of-class work will include a project in which students might analyze a representative work or works of a given writer or trace a theme in the works of two or more writers.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned material closely and thoughtfully; to attend class regularly and contribute to class discussions; and to satisfactorily complete examinations, quizzes, and other written work.

Prerequisites

EN-100.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Focus on the elements of poetry and the techniques of interpretive reading in a survey of significant poetry.

Course Content

Study of poetic elements (for example, imagery, allusion, and use of sound) and poems selected from various time periods and cultures. Additional materials related to the ideas in individual poems and to the nine objectives of the General Education program will be provided.

Nature of Course

The object is to help students become more thoughtful readers of poetry. This means developing an understanding of the way poems are put together and making qualitative judgments about them, but it also means relating the ideas in the poems to oneself and one's world (the nine objectives). The class includes a variety of activities. There will be some lectures and class discussions, but most of the work will be done in small groups. The atmosphere will be that of an informal workshop. Students will be expected to be active and regular participants in the class's work. In addition to reading and listening to poetry, students will analyze poems for techniques and ideas. The ideas in the poems will be dealt with in assignments involving the nine objectives. The semester project is to compile a personal annotated sampling of contemporary English-language poets. Students will be expected to do some reading aloud (in small groups and in class). There will be some exercises of a more or less creative nature, but students will not be required to write poems.

Student Expectations

Satisfactory performance on three examinations plus the final, on written and oral exercises and reports, on the term project, and on preparation for and performance in class. Tests will consist of objective, short answer, and essay problems.

Prerequisites

EN-100.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A study of mythology and of literature with mythological themes.

Course Content

Utilizing a world mythology textbook and supplementary materials, we will examine such mythic themes as creation, flood, afterlife, gods, and heroes in a variety of cultures and in ancient and modern literature. We will seek to see in myths and mythic motifs the shared concerns of human beings throughout the ages and to appreciate the interrelated mythic elements in such diverse fields as history, archaeology, religion, philosophy, art, and literature.

Nature of Course

We will have regular reading assignments in the textbook and/or in supplemental materials. In addition, students will do some research in subjects that they will pursue individually or in groups with the aim of sharing the results of their research with the class. Class and group discussions will make up much of our class time. The instructor will sometimes lecture on topics about which he/she is knowledgeable, but students will be encouraged to question and comment appropriately. There will be some short (and usually impromptu) writing assignments or other means of responding to topics under consideration.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to do all assigned reading, to participate in class/group discussions, to do some research (with results presented to the class), and to take at least three exams. The exams will be a combination of objective questions and essay. The semester grade will be determined by exam scores (approximately 60%) and by research, class and group participation, and short assignments (approximately 40%).

Prerequisites

EN-100.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Study of best forms of literature for children; development of criteria for judging children's books. Does not count on major or minor in English.

Course Content

Children's Literature is a course in which you will read widely in and about the field of books for children in kindergarten through grade six. The course will focus on the qualities and characteristics of the different types of books for children (picture books, folk and fairy tales, poetry, modern fantasy, contemporary realism, historical fiction, biography, and information books) and on the values of particular books for use with children in terms of their developmental and aesthetic growth.

Nature of Course

The goal of the course is to enable students to become more discriminating readers and selectors of children's books, which means developing an understanding of the literary and artistic elements employed in creating children's books and making qualitative judgments about the books. Although some classes are lecture/class discussion, students will frequently work in small groups, analyzing and evaluating works of children's literature that they have read. Keeping current on the reading (text and children's books) is a must. Library research projects are required.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all readings in the text and of selected books for children, to participate in class activities and discussions, to complete the research projects, and to complete satisfactorily frequent quizzes and a minimum of two major exams plus the final exam.

Prerequisites

EN-100; EL-120.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A survey of literature in all its variety--short stories, novels, poems, and drama. Emphasis on reading, analysis, and writing about literature.

Course Content

Stories and poetry--some of the most exciting that people have enjoyed for many years--are the main subjects for reading and class discussion. All varieties--from the lyrics of popular songs by John Lennon, for example, to the "symphonies" of William Shakespeare, from short stories about life in Ireland or Russia to maybe a novel by Ernest Hemingway--are included.

There will be many short poems and stories that can be read in a few minutes and also a few longer works that may take several class meetings to cover.

Nature of Course

This course will increase the students' pleasure and appreciation of literature as a way to experience and understand life. The course will increase students' ability to speak and write perceptively about literature and life. Because the fictional world pervades real life--even dominates it for many people, via TV if nothing else--skill in recognizing theme is very important.

Good attendance and class participation are needed, so students should try to anticipate class discussion--some of the same questions apply to various literary works and recur in class and on tests. But students are encouraged to also contribute questions and comments that occur to them as they read a given work.

Student Expectations

The student will read (reread if necessary) all assigned materials before class discussion.

There will be short quizzes, exams including essay questions, and a final examination. Some out-of-class readings may be suggested from library materials, and at least one paper requiring research will be assigned.

Prerequisites

EN-100.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

An analytical examination of representative musical works since 1827 with emphasis on understanding the manipulation of musical symbols and its effect.

Course Content

Three class periods per week will be devoted to the examination of a musical work, during which the historical, political, aesthetic, and artistic "climate of the times" will be explored and related to the work. This relating will involve the intent of the artist, the means and vocabulary employed, and the effectiveness of the result. A short paper will summarize the investigation of each work examined. Also, each will research and produce a short summary of a musical period, style, or "school" each week.

Nature of Course

Music's vocabulary consists of symbols which are consciously made use of by musicians to evoke a response in the listener. In some cases, the desired response is political or religious; while in others the musician wants to share an emotion which s/he feels. By examining music whose effect is predictable within our culture, we try to learn what in the structure of the work provokes this effect. Active discussion and writing are central to the format; and all exams are essay.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to participate in all class sessions and discussions, to examine each example under study thoroughly to determine its symbolic, affective, and musical impact on the listener or perceiver, and to complete all written assignments and examinations successfully.

Prerequisites

The ability to read music.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

An exploration of the main issues in philosophy through philosophical and literary readings.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to both traditional and contemporary issues in philosophy through a study of original philosophical and literary works. In addition to becoming acquainted with the main issues and methodologies of philosophy, students will learn to appreciate the meaning and significance of philosophical ideas and theories, develop skills in critical thinking and logical argument, and learn the art of reflective reading and writing.

Some traditional issues addressed in philosophy are: What is knowledge? What is truth? What is science? How is the mind related to the body? How can we know whether God exists? Can we have objective knowledge or right and wrong? Do human beings free will? Some contemporary issues addressed in philosophy are: Can machines think? Is the mind a computer program? What is consciousness? Are all standards of conduct relative?

Nature of Course

There is a significant emphasis on reading, writing, and discussion. Reading assignments are usually original works which should be thought of as subjects of investigation rather than as textbooks from which information can be retrieved. Writing assignments are regularly made and often require students to write about the readings or issues under discussion. Philosophy is a conversational mode of inquiry and active participation in both class discussion and on-line computer conferences is expected. Essay questions are a component in all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, participate in class discussion, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final exams. Students should also expect to write one or more short papers, as well as to do some elementary research in the library.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A study of the literary genres and historical contexts of the New Testament writings.

Course Content

New Testament Literature is a study of the various writings which comprise the New Testament. Some of the topics to be covered include:

  1. Social and Religious Context
    1. Canon, Text and Transmission of the New Testament
    2. Judaism in the First Century
    3. Hellenistic Thought and Culture
  2. The Genre of Gospel
    1. The Genre of Gospel: Form and Purpose
    2. Study of Individual Gospels
    3. The quest for the Historical Jesus
  3. The Genre of Apostolic History
  4. The Genre of Epistle
    1. Paul
    2. Pauline Epistles
    3. Catholic Epistles
  5. The Genre of Apocalyptic
  6. Epilogue: Non-canonical Writings

Nature of Course

This course is geared toward developing

  1. a general knowledge of the collection of literary texts known as the New Testament and
  2. the ability to apply different methods of interpretation and literary criticism to the writings of the New Testament.

A variety of teaching strategies are utilized in class sessions. Students should devote 5 to 10 hours per week of study time to this course.

Student Expectations

  1. Read the New Testament and a Textbook
  2. In-Class Discussion Pages
  3. Resource Assignments
  4. Analysis of an Article
  5. Creative Writing Exercise
  6. Group Project
  7. Three Examinations

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A historical and critical study of the literature of the Old Testament, using methods of modern biblical scholarship.

Course Content

Old Testament Literature is a study of the various writings which comprise the Old Testament. Within this ancient collection, different types of literature are identified. An attempt is made to apprehend and understand the original context and intended purpose of these ancient writings. Some of the topics to be covered include:

  1. Literature of the Torah
    1. Primeval narratives
    2. Ancestral sagas
  2. Literature of Liberation, Law, and Ritual
    1. Exodus/Sinai narratives
    2. Historical narratives
  3. Literature of Prophetism
    1. The prophet and the oracle
    2. The oracle as literary expression
    3. Prophetic oracles of the Old Testament
  4. Literature of Praise, Worship, and Spiritual Inquiry
    1. Hebrew Poetry
    2. Practical wisdom literature
    3. Speculative wisdom literature

Nature of Course

This course is geared toward developing

  1. a general knowledge of the collection of literary texts known as the Old Testament and
  2. the ability to apply different methods of interpretation and literary criticism to the writings of the Old Testament.

Students will be expected to read selected passages from the Old Testament in addition to the textbook. Class sessions are primarily lecture with discussion encouraged. Students should devote 5 (five) hours per week of study time to this course.

Student Expectations

  1. Active participation in class sessions.
  2. Complete two examinations: a mid-term and a final.
  3. Complete four exercises in Literary Text Analysis.
  4. Complete two journal article reports.
  5. Complete an Experiential Learning project.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Designed to develop ability to read Hispanic literary texts; to acquaint students with a selection of major Hispanic authors; to introduce basic concepts of literary analysis; to increase students' ability to speak and understand Spanish through class discussions in Spanish.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had exceptional high school preparation (4-5 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 9 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

Students will read a selection of representative works of Hispanic literature. Emphasis will be on vocabulary building, developing strategies for reading comprehension, and recognizing some literary devices and techniques.

Nature of Course

This course introduces students to basic strategies for approaching Hispanic literature and develops the vocabulary needed to read Hispanic texts with an increased degree of skill and ease. Students become acquainted with different literary styles and authors of Hispanic literature. There is heavy emphasis on class discussion of the works studied.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all reading assignments and to participate in class discussions of the readings. Regular homework assignments, quizzes and exams test students' ability to read and understand Hispanic literary texts. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish.

Prerequisites

SN-200 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2207
generaleducation@semo.edu
Academic Hall 132

General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 3400
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701