General Education Handbook

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsEconomic Systems

Catalog Description

Food production and distribution in the advancement of societies in developed and developing countries.

Course Content

Introduction. Economic, political, and cultural issues surrounding the persistence of hunger: Population, production, foreign aid, National Security, and the New International Economic Order. Food, agriculture and economic growth. The plants and animals that nourish man. Cultural, environmental, and governmental factors in food production and agricultural development. Food storage, security, and distribution. The hesitant recovery and prospects for sustained economic growth. Human nutritional needs and food sources. Sustaining world agriculture and food production opportunities for growth. Land ownership and tenure. Food strategies for tomorrow and a look to the future.

Nature of Course

  1. General Description: The course is based on the assumption that food production and distribution is basic for the existence of man and animals and the development and survival of societies throughout the world. It assumes that food science and technology, food processing, distribution, and services are directly related to social, economic, and political structures throughout the world. The course will provide an opportunity for students to explore, obtain knowledge, and acquire an understanding of the importance of food in our societies and for the health and well being of man and animals.
  2. Teaching Format: Lesson plans will be developed for each lecture-discussion session. Each lesson will include a topic, purpose, objectives, reading references, course notes, teaching-learning activities, and a progress evaluation. The activities will vary for each lesson and will include both classroom and outside class activities. Lectures, discussions, panels, and visual aids (slides, video tapes, etc.) will be utilized throughout the semester.
  3. Student Assignments: Class preparation assignments will include readings, utilization of library resources, and completion of assigned teaching-learning activities. Assignments to collect information from a variety of sources will be important for students to understand the dimensions of world food problems and the potential for food security in developed and developing countries. Projects will be assigned to identify food supplies and food quality in various cultures.
  4. Expectations of Students: Attend class, participate in class discussion and complete reading assignments in a timely manner, show evidence of study outside of class, prepare and complete written assignments, and take examinations on scheduled dates.

Student Expectations

  1. Examinations
    1. Three one-hour
    2. One two-hour final
  2. Progress evaluations and quizzes
  3. Teaching-learning activities
    1. Projects, special assignments, and/or papers
    2. Review of video tapes, films, and/or slides
    3. Presentations including panel discussions and role playing

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsBehavioral Systems

Catalog Description

Examines biological and cultural foundations of sex and aggression, with an emphasis on critical examination of the popular media.

Course Content

This course examines biological and cultural foundations of human behavior using an anthropological perspective. Subject materials are drawn from primate studies, human prehistory, and cultural and physical anthropology. Emphasis is placed on the critical examination of commonly-held ideas about human nature, particularly as they are presented in the popular media.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: Students will be asked to read assigned sections of the text and to locate, read and report on relevant professional and popular articles which relate to the subject matter.
  2. Emphasis on Writing: Students will be asked to write abstracts on the articles they research, and essays critiquing two films dealing with popular representations of early human behavior.
  3. Out-of-Class Projects: In general, the out-of-class projects are the two essays mentioned above, article summaries, and illustration projects relating to lecture material.
  4. Teaching Format: Traditional lecture and interactive discussions based on the film critiques and article summaries.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to question their own assumptions about human behavior, and to demonstrate their ability to research questions about this topic in both the popular and scientific behavior. With respect to tests, students are expected to integrate, synthesize, and discuss the material covered in lectures, videos and readings.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Students will learn and apply scientific methods of observing cultural and social behavior. Provides foundation for anthropological study of culture.

Course Content

This course helps students learn the skills necessary to objectively observe other cultures free of personal bias and ethnocentrism. The student masters a series of skills which allows her/him to view the world in the same terms informants from another culture or subculture use to view their world. The skills learned help avoid conflicts based on cultural misunderstanding.

Nature of Course

This course emphasizes experiential learning. The student will learn to use techniques rather than simply memorizing them. Students will participate in, and observe, a culture or subculture significantly different from their own. They will keep detailed observational notes on their encounters and a personal journal based on their experiences. They will analyze their observations of the other culture and will present a written report (ethnography) describing the rules by which the observed culture generates and interprets social behavior. This is a laboratory course which requires the student to spend 40 or more hours observing her/his chosen culture.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to be informed participants in class discussion groups. They are expected to be able to describe the culture they observed as seen by the cultures insiders. Students are expected to master the basic concepts and skills of observing other cultures and to demonstrate their mastery in a written report (ethnography).

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

The impact of crop production and utilization on society, including the science of food-crop production, horticulture and pasture management.

Course Content

Students will learn the science of plants grown for food and other human and animal uses. They will gain an understanding of, and an appreciation for the history of food production and the progression of agriculture to the present. Each student will gain an appreciation of where and how their food and fiber is produced, even though most people in the USA are not directly involved with food production. The aesthetics of plants for landscaping, public parks and golf courses will also be studied.

Nature of Course

n/a

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to participate in their groups when problems are presented in class
  2. Tests are designed to evaluate student competency and understanding of the biological principles of plant growth and development, production practices, cropping systems, as well as the history, uses, marketing and utilization of agricultural products
  3. During the sections on Plant Growth and Development, and Pests and Diseases, students will be assigned a crop (either field or horticultural), and will outline the factors that growers have control over that will affect growth and development or pest control. They will learn the decision-making processes required to grow crops profitably, and how to incorporate environmentally-sound production practices
  4. Students will work in groups to write a term paper on a minor crop of economic value. Students are expected to follow the guidelines for writing the paper, which will be given to them when the assignment is made. This includes writing the paper using MLA format, proper in-text citations and Works Cited, covering the subject assigned, and doing so with proper grammar, sentence structure, word choice and overall paper structure
  5. Students are expected to present their findings to the class. This will include individual presentations with the first two assignments on Plant growth and Development, and Pests and Diseases. Group presentations will be the culminating exercise from the final term paper for the class.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Fundamentals of cultural anthropology, including its development as a discipline and perspectives on culture, language, kinship, family, subsistence, religion, and globalization.

Course Content

The first part (approximately one third) of the course presents the study of concepts, values, and vocabulary necessary for understanding Cultural Anthropology as a discipline. The second part focuses on specific cultural topics of interest to anthropologists, including human language, kinship, marriage and family structures, food procurement and subsistence systems, religion and worldview, art, and the effects of globalization on cultures.

Nature of Course

The course presents anthropology as one particular means of researching the social and material world around us, with a specific focus on analysis of human social behavior and the cultural underpinnings of social organization. While the course regards human social behavior as a unifying characteristic of the species, it uses specific beliefs and behaviors from cultures around the world to exemplify the extensive variety and possibilities of cultural expression. Students should gain a knowledge of the basic techniques, concepts and vocabulary used by cultural anthropologists as well as an appreciation for themselves and others as cultural beings.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend all class sessions and activities, participate fully in class discussions in a way that demonstrates their preparation and understanding of the material, submit assigned work on time, and to seek help and guidance from instructor and peer mentors (advanced undergraduate students) as provided.
Eight two-week units are covered in the course, each with its own quiz, at least one out-of-class film viewing and assigned worksheet, and accompanying exercises (some online, some hardcopy or brief in-class presentation). A final comprehensive essay is submitted during finals week.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

A course combining studio drawing with the study of how drawing incorporates and communicates the experiences and values of society.

Course Content

This course will investigate the role drawing plays in art and in society in both historical and cultural contexts. Additionally, this course provides students with an opportunity to experience and practice various aesthetic principles, concepts and techniques through hands on drawing projects and experiments. Course content includes a basic overview of the role art has played in human society, through the ages and across cultures. Accompanying this study, a number of drawing exercises, projects and experiments demonstrate key visual/aesthetic principles and drawing techniques. These studio exercises coincide with lecture, discussion, visual aids and text reading that place them in the cultural and historical context out of which they arose and which they best express. A fundamental principle on which this course is based is the notion that art changes to reflect the social, political and cultural events and issues which define the times and places in which it is made.

Nature of Course

The course begins with a short "drawing primer" which is designed to introduce students to basic drawing techniques and increase their confidence in the use of these techniques. It then proceeds through a chronological and cross cultural survey of the major periods, movements and cultures in art history. Each topic introduced in the study is coupled with a drawing project which demonstrates the key issues of that time, place and culture through drawing practice. Students should gain an enhanced appreciation for why art changes from generation to generation and culture to culture by doing some of the things that various artists have done at various times and in various cultural contexts rather than merely reading and listening to lectures about such things. This course does not require drawing ability but it provides basic instruction in studio art to foster personal visual expression.

Student Expectations

  1. Prepare for all classes and do assigned reading.
  2. Participate in class discussions and critiques.
  3. Complete all writing and drawing assignments in an appropriate manner.
  4. Provide drawing supplies and materials.Grades will be determined by the student’s performance in classroom discussion and critique, examinations, two papers and a portfolio of drawing projects.

Grades will be determined by the student's performance in classroom discussion and critique, examinations, two papers and a portfolio of drawing projects.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

Ceramics, one of mankind's oldest and lasting handicrafts, provides us with a record of human needs and aspirations through the ages. Pottery and other ceramic artifacts will be examined and compared for function, design, technique and decoration to gain enhanced understanding of cultures that created them. No prerequisites. Completion of EN-100 suggested.

Course Content

The purpose of this course is to define, broaden and value one's personal aesthetic via cultural studies of ceramic art and hands on clay experiences. Students will investigate the ceramics of cultures from neolithic through contemporary times as a means of understanding human experience. In addition to readings on major cultures, students will be introduced to clay forming, decorating and firing techniques. Students will also learn what clay is, where it comes from, why it is plastic and the changes it goes through in firing. The appreciation of good design and craftsmanship in ceramics will be emphasized. A course essay will require critical observation of a specific culture and its ceramics while providing an opportunity to promote the development of good writing skills.

Nature of Course

A variety of learning experiences including lectures, demonstrations, films and slides, hands on clay experiences, and University Museum collection tour will be provided.
Several hands on projects will be produced during course studio time using earthenware clay.
A survey of contemporary ceramics will be presented by student oral reports.

Student Expectations

  1. Two examinations will be given on required readings, class lectures and vocabulary.
  2. Three assigned clay projects will be graded during the semester end final critique. Excellent class attendance is necessary for successful completion of project requirements.
  3. An oral presentation on a contemporary ceramic artist will require research of pertinent literature at Kent library and use of computer-assisted visuals.

Grades will be determined by the student's performance in classroom discussion and critique, examinations, two papers and a portfolio of drawing projects.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

The course investigates the role and value of art as an essential human aesthetic experience. No prerequisites.

Course Content

  1. Define art as a reflection of culture and a form of individual expression developed within themes, purposes and styles.
  2. Outline the language of art and show how it is used to analyze composition and design.
  3. Investigate the two-dimensional art media, including the camera arts and graphic design.
  4. Explore the three-dimensional art media, including architecture and environmental design.
  5. Present an overview of the history of art in our culture.

Nature of Course

The course will include lectures, discussions, slide presentations, written assignments, quizzes, examinations and observation and critiques of original art in galleries and museums.

Student Expectations

All students will be expected to participate in class discussions. Students will also provide written reactions and reflections on art and aesthetic issues and take a series of written exams, including a final examination. To enhance their experience, the students will participate in a field trip to a major museum.

Grades will be determined by the student's performance in classroom discussion and critique, examinations, two papers and a portfolio of drawing projects.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Development and fundamentals of the livestock industry including breeds, physiology, nutrition and products of sheep, cattle, horses, poultry and Swine.

Course Content

Agricultural animals are an essential part of the living systems dynamics. They provide food and fiber that feeds and clothes the world. Understanding how these animals are used in the United States; their advantages and disadvantages, how they are fed, cared for and reproduce is essential to the agricultural industry. Their wide variety of uses and advantages contributes to the many uses of animal agriculture worldwide.

Nature of Course

N/A

Student Expectations

Students will be evaluated on their performance in several ways:

  1. Students are expected to participate in their groups when verbal or written problems are presented in class.
  2. Tests (4 and a final) are designed to evaluate their competency and understanding of the biological principles of animal growth and development, as well as the history, marketing and utilization of agricultural products
  3. Students will work in groups to write a 3 - 5 page term paper on an animal and their importance and value to current day life. Adherence to the guidelines for writing the paper, are a must. This includes writing the paper using MLA format, covering the subject assigned, and doing so with proper grammar, sentence, paragraph, and paper structure.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Using scientific reasoning and evidence from various biological disciplines to test hypotheses about the common ancestry of organisms. Three one-hour lectures.

Course Content

This course explores evidence relating to the common ancestry of organisms on Earth. It is divided into a series of units, covering the process of science, comparative study of skeletons of vertebrates, fossil evidence, the genetic code, and comparative study of molecular biology of organisms.

Nature of Course

Students proceed by developing their own hypotheses about the origin and relatedness of organisms. These hypotheses are tested against anatomical and molecular evidence in a series of units. Student record their hypotheses, predictions, results, and conclusions, along with their reasoning processes, in ongoing journal entries during the course. In the process the students are exposed to a variety of types of biological evidence along with the tools for locating and analyzing it, and gain experience in application of scientific reasoning to a problem.

Student Expectations

Attend all classes, participate in all class activities, and satisfactorily complete all assignments and examinations.

Prerequisites

Must be EN100 eligible.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Emphasis on human cell, tissue, and organ system function. Discussions focus on a systems approach to human health and disease. Does not count on any major or minor in Biology Department.

Course Content

Although the emphasis of this course is on the physiological functions of human organ systems, effort will be made to show the interrelationship among biological, psychological and social functions of the human organism. Using a systems approach to frame the interaction among the various levels of human systems, from cellular to community, students will learn how changes at one level of a system influence changes at other levels. Biological principles of cell, tissue and organ systems will be reviewed in the context of how they may affect, or be affected by, psychological and social behavior. Examples will include demonstrating how biological communication via hormonal and nervous system signals initiates a stimulus-response cycle not limited to biological functions, but in tandem with psychological and social stimuli. Study of human diseases will allow students to explore how biological processes, interacting with psychological and social factors, contribute to human health and disease.

Nature of Course

Organ systems and their functions are presented by lecture, with supplementary web materials, and through group or individual learning activities. A portion of class periods will be devoted to the analysis of current events, as reported in various news media, within a biological context. Students are expected to participate in this analysis and share their findings within a small or large group setting.

Student Expectations

Exams will account for approximately 50% of the course grade. These exams will be a combination of objective and short answer questions. Participation in group and individual learning activities will determine the remaining 50% of the course grade.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

Discussion of biological principles with application to environmental issues.

Course Content

Environmental Biology introduces students to basic biological principles in the context of pertinent environmental issues. These principles will primarily concern ecological topics such as energy flow, population growth, nutrient cycling, and the interactions between living organisms and their environment. In addition, the course will introduce students to the process of science, the concept of scientific authority, and the role of scientists in forming environmental policy. The impact of human activity on biological systems will be considered under the topics of: overpopulation and world hunger, energy and mineral resources, water resources and pollution, biological diversity, air pollution and atmospheric alterations, and wastes and hazardous chemicals.

Nature of Course

The course will consist of three 50-minute sessions per week. One time commitment outside of the regularly scheduled class period will be required. A mixture of teaching strategies will be employed, including lecture, discussion, videotapes, laboratory experiments, and field trips.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend and participate in all class activities including lectures, laboratory experiments, video summaries, small group discussion/debate, class presentations, field trips, examinations, and library investigation of an environmental issue. Student performance will be assessed on the basis of written assignments, examinations, and class participation.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

A study of the history and culture of the deaf, including an introduction to Signed English designed to enable students to communicate with and develop a basic understanding of persons in the deaf community.

Course Content

This course is an introduction to the use of communication methods and will provide a basic understanding of an exposure to issues relating to the deaf culture.

Students will have experience with the use of a variety of manual communication systems which will assist them in communicating with persons who are hearing impaired or deaf.

Cultural content of this course will allow students to develop an understanding of the cognitive and emotional development, social barriers, educational and occupational issues, cultural biases and family issues of persons who are deaf. The historical perspective of the deaf community will also be included. Students will develop communication skills and cultural knowledge through interaction with persons who are deaf.

Nature of Course

This is a participation course which emphasizes active learning and experience in interacting with persons who are deaf. Class activities include Signed English practice demonstrations, guest speakers, video presentations, lecture, and class discussion.

Student Expectations

The course will include frequent quizzes covering reception and expression of Signed English vocabulary, periodic exams covering sign vocabulary and deaf culture, and literature and video reviews. Students will be expected to attend presentations by guest speakers. Grades are based on the composite of student quizzes, exams, literature and video reviews, and class participation.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Insights into relating to others through the framework of dating, committed relationships, family and friends.

Course Content

This course provides an understanding of relationships and families within a social historical context. Students examine the interrelationship of a variety of topics including: diversity, gender socialization, dating/marriage, sexuality, parenting, divorce/remarriage, and balancing work and family.

Nature of Course

Textbook readings, lecture, discussion, PowerPoint and videos will be used to present course information. Students will work individually and in cooperative learning teams. Numerous opportunities will be provided for students to exercise oral and written communication skills. Self assessment is emphasized.

Student Expectations

Course evaluation will include grades on student participation in class activities, particularly self assessment questionnaires and quizzes. Grades on two papers focused on self evaluation in personal relationships and scores on three multiple choice exams will also contribute to the final grade.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsBehavioral Systems

Catalog Description

An overview of the social, cognitive, physical and emotional changes that occur from conception to adolescence. Application of principles of development to the understanding of child development and behavior.

Course Content

This course will present an overview of the social, cognitive, physical, and emotional development of the child from conception to adolescence. Theoretical, empirical, and practical perspectives on child development will be presented and integrated. Cultural and historical variations in the concepts of children and of development will be discussed as they relate to differences in the treatment of children.

Nature of Course

The teaching format will combine lecture and discussion styles in the classroom, and independent learning experiences outside the classroom. Students will be expected to read the text and may be assigned some additional readings in preparation for exams and for class discussions and projects. Students will complete one or more course projects that will include written and/or oral reports. Evidence of critical thinking and effective communication will be emphasized.

Student Expectations

Students' understanding of material in the text, any supplemental readings, and classroom discussions will be assessed by examinations. These may consist of multiple choice, matching, completion, or essay items. Brief quizzes may be given at the discretion of the instructor.

Student evaluation also will be based on informed participation in classroom activities/discussions and satisfactory completion of all outside projects/writing assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

Development of creative expression in children: theoretical foundations of aesthetics; exploration of integrated arts – music, movement, drama, nature, visual arts.

Course Content

Students in this course will explore the role of the arts in child development and the role of the brain in children’s creative processes. Additionally, they will be given opportunity to discover conditions that stimulate creative expression and promote synthesis of novel products in art media. Course content includes a basic overview of the developmental stages in music, movement, drama, and visual arts as seen through the lens of the child’s expressive capabilities and cultural influences in the child’s world. These layers of study will guide students in planning and implementing culturally relevant integrated music, movement, drama, and visual arts activities for children.

Nature of Course

Through the lens of the child’s right to creative thought and expression, the course begins by scanning environmental conditions and internal human factors that provoke creative expression. By unfolding creative thought and expression concepts, the course leads the student into self-expression projects, which may be replicated, in part, as aesthetic activities for children. Attention to the spatial qualities of integrated arts engages the student in sensory exploration and use of both man-made and nature-made tools for creative problem-solving and communication of aesthetic values.

Student Expectations

  • Active participation in class discussions and activities
  • Satisfactory completion of all course assignments
  • Satisfactory completion of observations
  • Satisfactory completion of final project

Student evaluation also will be based on informed participation in classroom activities/discussions and satisfactory completion of all outside projects/writing assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsPhysical Systems

Catalog Description

The principles governing the systematic behavior of matter, with applications to life and living. One may not receive credit for both CH-180 and CH-181/001/081. Two lectures and three hours of laboratory.

Course Content

"Chemistry in Our World" begins with a look at the way that the Scientific Method is used to increase our understanding of the physical world. We then investigate how physical and chemical properties are used to classify and identify substances.

After we see how substances are similar and different, we begin to examine some of the ways by which chemists have explained these similarities and differences. We begin at the level of the atom, move on to the molecular level, and finally relate the molecular level to the level of our everyday experience.

On the atomic level, we investigate how we came to recognize atoms as "building blocks" from which substances are made. We see how protons, neutrons, and electrons determine the properties of an atom, and we briefly survey radioactivity and nuclear processes.

On the molecular level, we see how atoms form ionic and covalent bonds, and we relate chemical bonding to the structure and properties of molecules. The octet rule lets us predict what kinds of compounds may be formed from the various elements. We then turn our attention to chemical reactions and ways to use the Law of Conservation of Matter to understand how chemical reactions occur.

Finally, we use our understanding of atoms and molecules to explain the structure and behavior of larger samples of matter - solids, liquids, and gases of a size large enough to weigh and observe.

Nature of Course

"Chemistry in Our World" is a course that emphasizes problem solving skills. Consequently, the teaching format stresses discussion of problem-solving strategies. We keep lecturing at a minimum, and we seldom require students to memorize chemical facts. The laboratory emphasizes critical thinking, problem solving, Internet-assisted instruction, and laboratory skills.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to participate in class and laboratory, and to read approximately 250 pages of assigned readings in the textbook. Students are expected to send and receive electronic mail, and to use a Web browser to access the course's Website. There will be three exams and a final; exams make use of problem-solving and descriptive skills, with little emphasis on simple recall.

Prerequisites

MA-101 or MA-102; completion of high school chemistry is recommended.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsPhysical Systems

Catalog Description

A one semester survey of the fundamental principles and systematic behavior of matter. Three lecture hours (CH-181), one recitation hour (CH-001), two lab hours (CH-081) must be taken concurrently. One may not receive credit for both CH-181/001/081 and CH-185/005/085.

Course Content

Basic Principles of Chemistry begins with an overview of the history of the Scientific Method as a way to increase our understanding of the physical world, with special attention paid to the role that numbers and measurements play in the practice of the Scientific Method. We then take time to develop a "tool box" of problem-solving strategies and aids that are used in applications of the Scientific Method.

After we have developed our "tool box," we investigate how scientists in many parts of the world applied the Scientific Method in ways which led to our current understanding of the atom and the molecule as basic organizations of matter. We then learn how our understanding of atoms and molecules can be applied to social and technological problems, such as acid rain, production of chemicals used in manufacturing, testing of products for purity, alternate energy sources, etc.

Nature of Course

Just as a mechanic depends on the tools in a tool box to repair a car, we make use of a critical thinking "tool box" to solve problems in CH-181. We spend much of our time discussing appropriate use of each tool; lecture is used only when necessary content is introduced. Since our emphasis is on problem-solving ability, little time is spent memorizing facts that can be found in the text or a reference book. The laboratory emphasizes problem solving and laboratory skills and techniques required to obtain and interpret data and observations.

Student Expectations

Although we make much use of numbers and measurements as we formulate solutions applicable to the problems mentioned above, the degree of mathematical sophistication is quite limited: The weekly recitation period provides the student with an ongoing opportunity to develop and perfect, with the assistance of the instructor, the math skills required to thrive in CH-181. The student is expected to attend class, recitation, and laboratory, and to read approximately 150 pages in the textbook. There will be three exams and a final; exams make use of the "tool box" developed in the course, with little emphasis on simple recall.

Prerequisites

MA-101 or MA-102.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

5

Perspectives on Natural SystemsPhysical Systems

Catalog Description

A study of atomic structure, chemical bonding, properties of matter and chemical reactions. Initial course in general chemistry sequence. Three lecture hours (CH-185), one recitation hour (CH-005), two lab hours (CH-085) must be taken concurrently.

Course Content

LINE 585

General Chemistry I looks at the way in which measurement of physical and chemical properties of samples of matter helps us to classify matter as elements and compounds, and then to determine whether these elements and compounds are made up of atoms, molecules or ions. The early theories of the structure of the atom are discussed and used to illustrate the Scientific Method. Chemical reactions are studied and students learn how to determine the amount of products formed and the heats of reaction. The properties of gases are investigated extensively. The periodic properties of elements are related to the electronic structure of atoms. Students learn to predict whether compounds exhibit ionic or covalent bonding and then to write Lewis Structures and predict the molecular geometries of covalently bonded compounds. The properties of liquids, solids and solutions are discussed. Students are taught the factors which can affect how fast chemical reactions occur, and learn to predict the step by step mechanisms by which the reactions occur. The basic concepts and principles of chemical equilibrium are dealt with. Students learn to solve problems involving equilibrium constants.

Nature of Course

General Chemistry I emphasizes the learning of concepts and principles and the solving of problems rather than the memorizing of definitions. Weekly homework assignments are made in order to help students internalize the subject matter. Laboratory experiments are carried out each week and these illustrate the concepts and principles of chemistry and develop problem solving and laboratory skills.

Student Expectations

There are five exams given, each worth 100 points and a 200 point final exam. The laboratory experiments account for 200 points on the grade and homework is worth 100 points.

Prerequisites

MA-101 or MA-102.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

5

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLogical Systems

Catalog Description

Logic concepts in computer programming and how they can be used in several application environments. Two hours lecture, two hours lab.

Course Content

This course provides the mathematical and logical tools for understanding core programming concepts. After beginning with a review of elementary algebraic expressions, Boolean algebra (including logical operations such as “and” and “or”, and relational operators such as “less than” and “greater than”) are then covered. These concepts are then used in programming constructs such as selection and iteration (“looping”). Initially, these mathematical and logical concepts are discussed using language-independent computer algorithms; they are then applied to a variety of software applications, such as a simple high-level programming language, a spreadsheet (such as Microsoft Excel) and HTML (the language used for web programming).

Nature of Course

N/A (100-level course).

Student Expectations

  1. Attend classroom lectures and course laboratory sessions.
  2. Complete readings, exams, quizzes, laboratory exercises and homework assignments.
  3. Demonstrate a working knowledge of course objectives through satisfactory performance on quizzes, exams, laboratory exercises and homework assignments.
  4. Properly document solutions as specified in laboratory exercises and homework assignments.

Prerequisites

MA102 with a grade of 'CR' or MA095 with a grade of 'C' or higher or ACT math score of 18-20 with MA095 placement score of 14 or higher or ACT math score of 21 or higher.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

Develops student ability to describe, analyze, interpret, and evaluate dance through exposure to writings, discussions, active learning dance experiences, and performances.

Course Content

The course includes a history of dance in Western and non-western societies, definitions and discussions of aesthetics, art, and the value of dance in societies and for individuals. Dance will be treated in three distinct ways: as a viewed experience (live and through videos), a physical experience (active learning situations), and a critical experience (criticism and analysis). The development of viewing, experiencing, and critical appreciation skills are the main concerns of this course.

Nature of Course

The course presents dance as an artistic form of expression and experience, and encourages specific but flexible critical and contemplative skills towards a richer appreciation of the ephemeral art form.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend class every day, critically read assignments, view and critique dance performances (live and video), prepare for class discussions, actively participate in classroom movement experiences, and satisfactorily complete classroom activities, quizzes, and a research paper or project.

Grades for the course will be based on active class participation, dance critiques, reflection responses, quizzes (short answer), and one research paper or project.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

Exploration and application of elements and principles of design. Examines fundamentals of interiors including sustainability, color, space planning and finishes.

Course Content

Students in this course will explore the profession of interior design and related disciplines and their importance to creative and sustainable built environments. Additionally, they will be given the opportunity to discover current environmental and global issues involved in the design disciplines. Course content includes a basic overview of ancient design philosophies and concepts through contemporary design philosophies and concepts. These layers of study will encourage the development of artistic expression. Students will investigate the concepts of color theory, the elements and principles of design, and how they relate to the human experience in the built environment.

Nature of Course

This course begins with an exploration of the specialized field of interior design and current factors affecting the profession. It then proceeds through a chronological and cross cultural survey of the major periods, movements, and styles of design. It aims to acquaint students with the main concepts of design fundamentals through a diverse cultural lens which creates the ability to make reasoned aesthetic decisions.

Student Expectations

  1. Satisfactorily complete class assignments and readings.
  2. Participate in class discussions.
  3. Attain a satisfactorily level of achievement on four written examinations and periodic quizzes.
  4. Apply the principles and elements of design to living environments.
  5. Construct a color wheel to understand color relationships and color schemes.
  6. Satisfactorily complete a research project.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsEconomic Systems

Catalog Description

An introduction to the domestic and international economic problems facing the United States today and an analysis of the policies designed to alleviate these problems.

Course Content

The course includes an introduction of basic economic concepts, principles and theories such as inflation, unemployment, Gross National Product, supply and demand and cost-benefit analysis. These concepts and theories are used to explain how the American economy works in a domestic and international setting. They are also used to analyze current economic problems and evaluate policies designed to alleviate these problems.

Nature of Course

The course has an assigned textbook which will be accompanied by readings from current periodicals and newspapers. Class time will be devoted to lecture, question/answer sessions and discussion. An out-of-class project involving information gathering and analysis will be assigned.

Student Expectations

Evaluation will be based on objective and subjective examinations, class participation, and the quality of the out-of-class project.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsEconomic Systems

Catalog Description

U. S. market economic system. Demand, supply, competition, pricing, resource allocation concepts applied to issues in business, labor, and public policy.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to a number of economic concepts, beginning with supply and demand. These concepts will be used to explore how a market economy operates. Current problems and issues in microeconomics such as price supports, the cost of health care, the minimum wage, mergers, labor unions, pollution and poverty (to name a few) will be discussed and analyzed using economic concepts.

Nature of Course

The course has an assigned textbook which may be supplemented by readings from current magazines and newspapers. Some writing is essential. At the beginning of the semester each student will select a project topic. During the semester the student will gather information about the topic, organize the information, and summarize it. Finally, students will identify an issue related to their topic and write an essay which defines the issue, presents arguments related to the issue and reaches a conclusion.

Student Expectations

Exams will include some objective questions as well as essay and short answer questions. Evaluation will be based on these exams, class participation, the project, and other assignments.

Class attendance is an important factor in this course. Class time will involve projects, simulations, and discussions as well as lectures.

Prerequisites

AD-101 with a minimum grade of "C" and MA-134 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsDevelopment of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

Survey of the history of Early European Civilization from ancient times to the post-Columbian era.

Course Content

This course entails a systematic study of a variety of human experiences from ancient times to the European expansion into the rest of the world. It examines social, political, economic, and cultural institutions of the various periods of early European history. It describes the characteristics of the institutions, the particular types of experiences they provided during a given period, how those characteristics were derived from earlier times and how they influenced subsequent eras. In addition, the course investigates the people of Europe, both the elite members of society and their struggles for power and the ordinary people and their efforts to survive in a society where they had little or no power and their voices were seldom heard.

Early European Civilization explores the blending of cultures in the formation of Europe, what common characteristics emerged to mark early Europeans as members of the same civilization and what differences remained to make early Europe a series of cultures and sub-cultures. It also shows how early European Civilization was distinct from the cultures that preceded it and how it interacted with civilizations that preceded it, as well as contemporary non-European civilizations.

Nature of Course

The primary instructional methods employed in this course are lecture and small-group discussions. Lectures provide broad summaries of historical periods and in-depth explorations of particular developments in a given period. Electronic maps provide a geographic perspective to many of the lectures. Small group discussions examine excerpts from the writings of people who lived in particular time and from contemporary historians who have written about the era. They aim at analysis, summary, and reaction to these excerpts, and they involve discovery of the themes among the various sources.

Early European Civilization provides opportunities for students to locate and gather information, think critically, and communicate both orally and in writing. These skills are developed through a guided discussion of historical research methods and a bibliographical research activity in Kent Library that use the tools for gathering biographical information about historical figures. They are cultivated through research into the life and accomplishments of a significant person from early Europe, which is presented in a biographical sketch. They also are acquired through brief summaries of and reactions to the primary and secondary sources that are discussed in small groups. In addition to the research and discussion activities, these intellectual skills are fostered by means of essays in answer to examination questions prepared outside of class.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to read assignments for lecture sessions as well as primary and secondary source assignments for small-group discussions. They will be required to write and present brief oral summaries of primary and secondary sources from an anthology, to research and write a brief biographical sketch on a significant figure of early European history and to answer essay questions on examinations. They also will be expected to identify significant historical persons, places, and events, and locate countries, their capitals, and important physical features on a map of Europe.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsDevelopment of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

A survey of the history of European Civilization from the Old Regime to the present.

Course Content

The course examines the emergence of European Civilization from a post medieval society into the era of the scientific revolution and the eighteenth century Enlightenment. A close examination of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Europe will demonstrate the break with the past and prepare for the political and intellectual upheavals of the nineteenth century. The study of the events leading to the explosive opening of the twentieth century with World War I followed by World War II and the Cold War will lead toward an understanding of European Civilization on the eve of the next era.

Nature of Course

The subject matter will be dealt with through lectures and/or class discussion.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and complete all assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Individual research project and group project.Development of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

A study of the development of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, their cultures, art, government, and religious beliefs.

Course Content

The course will study the most important persons, places, and major events of Greek and Roman history and how these ancient civilizations influenced the development of the modern world.

Nature of Course

This course studies the history and culture of Ancient Greece and Rome in a historical context. Emphasis is placed on students doing research on selected course topics. The process, methods and presentation of research and the use of the library are covered.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Maintenance of appropriate class notes.
  3. Completion of all assignments.
  4. Participation in class discussions
  5. Success on tests and quizzes.
  6. Individual research project and group project.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Exploration of race, ethnicity, social class, and gender issues in schooling today.

Course Content

The study of diversity issues in the schools is explored through a variety of perspectives. The formation of the cultural composition of the United States serves as an introduction to the course. Particular focus is then given to conceptual frameworks of racial, ethnic, social class, and gender identity development, current equity issues, and post-modern critiques of schooling.

Nature of Course

The course involves a significant amount of reading and writing. Assigned reading comes primarily from the textbook and reserve materials. These readings draw from the literatures of schooling, ethnic history and identity development, and post-modernist studies. Assigned writing varies from informal reflective pieces to formal essays and term projects. It is expected that the writing will demonstrate both creative and critical thinking skills. Group projects include informal debates and role plays. Class sessions are mainly interactive, combining short lectures with small and whole group discussions. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to actively contribute and participate in these discussions.

Student Expectations

  1. Complete all written, oral, and group assignments in a timely manner.
  2. Actively prepare readings and research for participation in class.
  3. Show satisfactory performance on the exams.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

English Composition 

Catalog Description

Focus on techniques of effective written expression.

Course Content

Students in this class will write a series of essays that build upon each other as a sequence of successively complex cognitive tasks. They will also learn about written communication as an individual and a social activity.

Nature of Course

Purposes of the course include the following: developing students’ writing abilities as reflected in coherent thought, effective organization, and reasonable stylistic force and fluency; fostering an appreciation of how writing functions in personal, social, historical, and cultural contexts, both as a means of expression and as a mode of learning. Students in the class engage in writing as a process for each of the formal assignments—from prewriting activities through drafting to revision. These assignments are supplemented by readings in the texts, by in-class group activities, and by writing of a less formal nature.

Student Expectations

Students should demonstrate satisfactory performance in all class activities, including both informal and formal writings and the final examination.

Prerequisites

EN 099 or appropriate score on University Placement Test.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionWritten Expression

Catalog Description

Focus on effective written expression in the context of a liberal education; emphasis upon critical thinking and the research paper.

Course Content

In addition to instruction in and practice of the elements of composition, selected essays will be read and analyzed as a basis for the development of the student's own writing skills and as the springboard to discussions and assignments addressing the nine objectives of the General Education program.

Nature of Course

Primarily a workshop class, this course will involve writing and reading essays. Students will be expected to share their work in pairs and small groups and to edit classmates' papers and to participate actively and regularly in the class's work. A major component is techniques of research; a research paper is required. As appropriate, the writing assignments will call on students to relate the materials in the assigned essays to themselves and their world (the nine objectives).

Student Expectations

Satisfactory performance in in-class workshops and on exercises and informal writings, on a minimum of five essays (plus revisions), at least one research paper, and the final examination (WP-002).

Prerequisites

EN-100 or advanced placement.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionWritten Expression

Catalog Description

A course in writing with particular emphasis on environmental issues. All students must complete a group project. Fulfills same degree requirements as EN-140.

Course Content

This course builds on the skills developed in EN-100. Students will read essays related to environmental issues. They will also study principles of argumentation. Together, these will serve as the basis for several of the writing projects they will complete. A portion of the course will be devoted to techniques of research writing. The group project will also serve as the basis for writing and speaking assignments.

Nature of Course

This course has three major elements: writing from reading, argumentation, and the group project. The first involves reading and discussing a variety of writing related to environmental issues and using that reading and discussion as a basis for writing. Environmental issues tend to be multi-faceted, and many of the course activities, including the research project, will be devoted to using reading as a basis for writing. Class activities will include group work related to the writing projects. The writing will also involve study and practice in the principles of argumentation. The group project will require students to investigate and report on a local environmental issue. This activity specifically addresses General Education objective 9: demonstrate the ability to function responsibly in one's natural, social, and political environment.

Student Expectations

  1. Participate in all class activities, including
    1. Discussions
    2. Group work
  2. Complete a group project, including
    1. Written report
    2. An oral presentation to the class
    3. A log recording work on the project
  3. Complete all written work, including
    1. Quizzes
    2. Essay assignments
    3. A research report
    4. The final examination (WP002)

Prerequisites

EN-100 or advanced placement.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsEconomic Systems

Catalog Description

Exploration and application of elements and principles of fashion. Examines fashion fundamentals including history, economics, international scope, sustainability and trends.

Course Content

Overview and Global View of the Fashion Industry
European Fashion Influences
Early American Clothing Influences
Fashion Retrospection: 100+ Years of Fashion
Fundamentals of Fashion
Fashion Principles, Perspectives and Theories
Marketing Terminology and the 4Ps of Fashion Marketing
Fashion Analysis and Prediction
Fashion Branding
Textile Producers and Suppliers
Designers, Product Developers, and Fashion Manufacturers
Fashion Market Centers, Wholesalers and IntermediariesTextile and Apparel Legislation
Fashion Retailing Formats, Careers and Opportunities

Nature of Course

Students will define the profession of Fashion and Consumer Studies.
Students will identify and apply fashion principles and perspectives to apparel choices
Students will identify, the psychological and cultural factors affecting fashion.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to participate in class discussions, activities and to complete all assigned readings. Exams will be used to assess students’ understanding of classroom discussions.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsEconomic Systems

Catalog Description

A study of basic family management concepts and decision making within the context of the family system. Emphasis is placed on application in the management of human and economic resources in achieving goals.

Course Content

This course covers fundamental family management concepts including demographics, family ecosystems, values, and goals. Family decision-making models and a family systems approach to family economics are explored. Management concepts will be applied to family financial issues.

Nature of Course

The teaching format will combine lecture and discussion styles in the classroom. Frequent group and individual written activities will require critical thinking and application of management concepts to family financial issues. Students will be expected to explore a variety of resources related to financial decision-making. Evidence of critical thinking and effective communication will be emphasized.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and activities, to complete all assigned readings, and to prepare journal reviews and other brief assignments. A research paper on a selected financial management issue is required. Three hourly exams and a final exam will be used to assess students’ understanding of reading materials and classroom discussions.

Prerequisites

EN-100 or advanced placement.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

A study of artistic elements of French cinema through critical examination of directors, themes, and techniques. In English; no knowledge of French required.

Course Content

This course is an introduction to the art and practice of film making in France. It acquaints students with the systematic analysis of the elements of film and with some of the major French directors and films. Students are guided through the technical, thematic, and cultural aspects of films produced in France and other French-speaking countries. All in-class work and textbook materials are in English and all films are subtitled in English.

The course is designed for students interested both in French culture and in film history and criticism, as well as those who wish to expand their knowledge of the artistic elements of a medium which has become identified almost exclusively with popular culture.

The course presents an overview of the historical development of French film and some of the major film movements in France: formalism, realism, "new wave" cinema, heritage cinema, surrealism, and modernism.The issue of American remakes of French films is also discussed, with particular attention to the issues which arise from films intended for the two different cultures.

Nature of Course

This course has a lecture/discussion format, for which students need to complete readings from the textbook and attend regular film viewings. Students are expected to consider films from the viewpoint of their artistic components and to offer analyses in both oral and written form. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and on the ability to synthesize and communicate informed opinions.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend all classes, to complete required readings, to view required films, and to participate actively in class discussions. In addition to viewing films required of the class, each student chooses an individual film to view and analyze.

Grades for the course are based on performance on two exams and a final exam, three short papers, one oral presentation, and participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

EN100 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLiving Systems

Catalog Description

This course examines, analyzes, and evaluates the relationships between the science of nutrition, health, and well being.

Course Content

This course is designed to provide a fundamental knowledge of the science of nutrition. The course provides the student with skills to critically evaluate the role of nutrition to health and to apply that knowledge to one's lifestyle. This study leads to an appreciation for the methods of scientific reasoning and research in understanding a living system.

Nature of Course

The teaching format will combine lecture and discussion styles in the classroom. Frequent activities will require critical thinking and application of knowledge in order to better equip the student to make informed food and lifestyle choices. Students will be asked to read the text and to locate and read relevant professional and popular articles which relate to the subject matter. Evidence of critical thinking and effective communication will be emphasized.

Student Expectations

A weekly activity will provide the student an opportunity to communicate knowledge and understanding of the subject. Four unit tests, including a final exam will be objective in nature. Each student will use computer technology to analyze their dietary intake. Reading and writing assignments require reading from current sources.

Grades for the course are based on performance on two exams and a final exam, three short papers, one oral presentation, and participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of French-speaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French.

Course Content

Students learn to pronounce French words and to use basic vocabulary and structures. Structures include present tense of regular and common irregular verbs, negative and interrogative structures, articles, and prepositions. Students will learn basic French vocabulary needed to function in a French speaking environment.

Students will compare structures in French and English, such as subject-verb agreements, word order, notions of gender, formal and informal address, etc. They will be called upon to use critical thinking and analytical skills.

Cultural content is an important part of the course. Students will learn basic geography and become familiar with features of daily life: food, shopping, university life, cultural life, etc. They will engage in guided out-of-class activities, including library projects and attendance at French films. Cultural awareness and interrelationships are discussed.

Nature of Course

This course combines an introduction to the study of the French language with a study of some major aspects of French culture.

Emphasis is on the use of French in oral communication situations, e.g., asking questions, describing daily activities, food, weather, numbers, time expressions, etc. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, films, and reports on cultural figures.

Student Expectations

The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over French vocabulary and structures. Students will be expected to write brief reports in English on cultural topics or on French films.

Grades for the course are based on performance on two exams and a final exam, three short papers, one oral presentation, and participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of the culture of French-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French.

Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Language Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course continues the study of French language and culture. Emphasis is placed on developing increased proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French.

Students learn the structures of the language, as well as the cultural context of the language, through practice of oral communication situations. Structures introduced at this level include narration in the past and future, the use of descriptive adjectives and adverbs, and the use of prepositions. Students will be expected to master the use of these and other structures. In addition, students will compare structures of English and French in order to understand the functioning of language.

The cultural content of the course will be integrated with the oral communication activities. Students will master certain cultural skills and knowledge through the appropriate use of the language in context.

Nature of Course

This is a participation course in which students increase their oral communication abilities in French and become acquainted with the cultural context of the French-speaking peoples. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, and reports on French films.

Student Expectations

Students will participate in individual and group projects both in and outside of class, using materials in the textbook and resources available on campus. The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over French vocabulary, structures, and culture. Students are also expected to write brief reports on cultural topics. Grades are based on a composite of students' oral and written performance as well as their demonstration of cultural knowledge and understanding.

Prerequisites

FR-100 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of French language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in French (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course builds on students' previous knowledge of French to develop proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Major aspects of French culture and contemporary French life are included in the material presented.

The course consists of regular assignments from the textbook for recitation in class, as well as written homework and oral presentations in French. Also included are readings from outside sources and listening comprehension activities in the language laboratory.

Nature of Course

The class emphasizes an active approach to learning. Student involvement and participation in class is essential. In addition to material assigned for class preparation, individual or group culture projects may be assigned.

Student Expectations

There are frequent quizzes and exams in class, as well as written and oral assignments and projects. Grades are based on a composite of students' written and oral performance and a demonstration of their knowledge and understanding of French culture. Students also write reports on French films.

Prerequisites

FR-120 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Designed to develop ability to read French literary texts; to acquaint students with a selection of major French authors; to introduce basic concepts of literary analysis; to increase students' ability to speak and understand French through class discussions in French.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had exceptional high school preparation (4-5 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in French are eligible to receive an additional 9 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

The course begins with a selection of short stories by important French, Belgian, Canadian or African authors. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and summarizing narrative structures.

Students read L'Etranger or another important French novel in its entirety. They discuss in French the elements of structure, character, theme, and style.

Students become acquainted with the principles of French versification and with dramatic literature by reading a selection of French poems and scenes from plays of major authors.

Nature of Course

This course acquaints students with basic strategies for approaching French literature and develops the vocabulary needed to read French texts with an increasing degree of skill and ease. Students become acquainted with French literary style and terms of literary analysis.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all reading assignments and to participate in class discussions of the readings. Regular quizzes and exams test students' ability to read and understand French literary texts.

Prerequisites

FR-200 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Spatial treatment of ethnic diversity of the world's macro cultures (e.g. Europe) and contemporary social problems associated with economic development.

Course Content

The primary purpose of this course is to help students with limited geographic background to learn about the cultural-social complexity of the world. A secondary purpose of the course is to examine the benefits and problems of modern economic development on traditional cultural groups, thereby dividing the world into two unequal parts: Developed World and Developing World. These purposes will be accomplished through examining such contemporary social topics as effects of population growth on migration, urbanization, food supply, and resource management. Of lasting benefit to students is an enlarged interest and understanding of the world which can lead to a greater sense of social responsibility.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: Assignments will be made in the textbook. Additional reading assignments will include articles and chapters from other books.
  2. Emphasis on Writing: Writing assignments will include a class journal and short projects.
  3. Out-of-Class Project: A library assignment will be required in the use of atlases. Students will also receive class handouts to develop critical thinking skills.
  4. Teaching Format: Lectures and class discussions about relevant geographic topics will be used.

Student Expectations

Exams (3 or 4) will account for about 90% of the grade. These exams will be a combination of objective and short essay or paragraph questions. Class projects will be used to determine the remaining percentage.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Study of the interrelationship of the components of human cultures, i.e., belief, social and material systems. Emphasis on social geographic principles and issues.

Course Content

The purpose of this course is to make the student aware of geographic concepts involving major social and cultural issues e.g., population, ethnicity, politics, and urbanization. The course will provide a framework for interpreting major cultural patterns of the world e.g., language and religion. Drawing from this framework students will be better able to evaluate their own cultural attitudes about life in relation to values of other world cultures e.g., family size, food preferences, and religious decisions.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: Most of the assignments will be in the textbook.
  2. Group Discussions: Group discussions will focus on the influence of one's cultural background on social issues such as family size (2-3 in the course).
  3. Emphasis on Writing: Writing assignment in the form of a term paper.
  4. Teaching Format: Lectures and discussions about relevant topics will be used.

Student Expectations

Exams will account for 75% of the grade. These exams will be a combination of objective and short essay or paragraph questions. Class projects will be used to determine the remaining percentage.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of German-speaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German.

Course Content

Students learn to pronounce German words and to use basic vocabulary and structures. Structures include present tense of regular and common irregular verbs, negative and interrogative structures, articles, and prepositions. Students will learn basic German vocabulary needed to function in a German speaking environment.

Students will compare structures in German and English, such as subject-verb agreements, word order, notions of gender, formal and informal address, etc. They will be called upon to use critical thinking and analytical skills.

Cultural content is an important part of the course. Students will learn basic geography and become familiar with features of daily life: food, shopping, university life, cultural life, etc. They will engage in guided out-of-class activities, including library projects and attendance at German films. Cultural awareness and interrelationships are discussed.

Nature of Course

This course combines an introduction to the study of the German language with a study of some major aspects of German culture.

Emphasis is on the use of German in oral communication situations, e.g., asking questions, describing daily activities, food, weather, numbers, time expressions, etc. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, films, and reports on cultural figures.

Student Expectations

The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over German vocabulary and structures. Students will be expected to write brief reports in English on cultural topics or on German films.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of the German-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German.

Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit Policy.

Course Content

This course continues the study of German language and culture. Emphasis is placed on developing increased proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing German.

Students learn the structures of the language, as well as the cultural context of the language, through practice of oral communication situations. In addition, students will compare structures of English and German in order to understand the functioning of language.

The cultural content of the course will be integrated with the oral communication activities. Students will master certain cultural skills and knowledge through the appropriate use of language in context.

Nature of Course

This is a participation course in which students increase their oral communication abilities in German and become acquainted with the cultural context of the German-speaking peoples. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, and reports on German films.

Student Expectations

Students will participate in individual and group projects both in and outside of class, using materials in the textbook and resources available on campus. The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over German vocabulary, structures and culture. Students are also expected to write brief reports on cultural topics. Grades are based on a composite of students' oral and written performance as well as their demonstration of cultural knowledge and understanding.

Prerequisites

GN-100 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of German language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in German (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course builds on students' previous knowledge of German to develop proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Major aspects of German culture and contemporary German life are included in the material presented.

The course consists of regular assignments from the textbook for recitation in class, as well as written homework and oral presentations in German. Also included are readings from outside sources and listening comprehension activities in the language laboratory.

Nature of Course

The class emphasizes an active approach to learning. Student involvement and participation in class is essential. In addition to material assigned for class preparation, individual or group culture projects may be assigned.

Student Expectations

There are frequent quizzes and exams in class, as well as written and oral assignments and projects. Grades are based on a composite of students' written and oral performance and a demonstration of their knowledge and understanding of German culture. Students will also write reports on German films.

Prerequisites

GN-120 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Designed to develop ability to read German literary texts; to acquaint students with a selection of major German authors; to introduce basic concepts of literary analysis; to increase students' ability to speak and understand German through class discussions in German.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had exceptional high school preparation (4-5 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in German are eligible to receive an additional 9 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

The course begins with a selection of short stories by important German, Swiss or Austrian authors. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and summarizing narrative structures.

Students read short German prose works in their entirety and discuss in German the elements of structure, character, theme, and style.

Students become acquainted with the principles of German versification and with dramatic literature by reading a selection of German poems and scenes from plays of major authors.

Nature of Course

This course acquaints students with basic strategies for approaching German literature and develops the vocabulary needed to read German texts with an increasing degree of skill and ease. Students become acquainted with German literary style and terms of literary analysis.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all reading assignments and to participate in class discussions of the readings. Regular quizzes and exams test students' ability to read and understand German literary texts.

Prerequisites

GN-200 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsPhysical Systems

Catalog Description

An examination of Earth's systems, how they work, and how they relate to people, with emphasis on natural and man-made hazards to society. Two lectures, one lab per week.

Course Content

This course emphasizes naturally occurring or human induced hazards such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, and water-supply contamination. The necessary background to understand these hazards is obtained through fundamental study of earth's internal dynamics and surficial processes.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: Regular reading assignments are given in the textbooks and supporting materials. Laboratory exercises include written materials which must be studied.
  2. Group Projects: Many of the lab projects are done by working teams. Simulations involving role-playing require group interaction. Students may participate in a debate or a poster session on environmental hazards.
  3. Emphasis on Writing: A notebook of laboratory activities must be kept. Several formal written laboratory project reports are also required. Brief, informal writing is required in some other laboratories.
  4. Out-of-Class Projects: All homework, including reading assignments are out-of-class work. The role-playing and debates will require out-of-class preparation. Some laboratory projects will require data collection out-of-class.
  5. Teaching Format: A wide variety of formats will be used including lecture, laboratory investigations, field study, role-playing simulations, student discussion, debate, and preparation and discussion of poster presentations.

Student Expectations

There are a minimum of three unit exams (300 points) and a comprehensive final exam (150 points). Many laboratories include graded work (150 points). Participation in class is evaluated and will be a factor in final grade assignment for those students within 3% plus or minus of a grade break point. Attendance is expected at all class meetings. Punctual completion of all assignments is required.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsBehavioral Systems

Catalog Description

Health topics with wide-ranging importance are examined. Issues are examined from various perspectives with special emphasis on the influence that individual health behavior decisions have on personal, societal, and global health status.

Course Content

Health topics are investigated from differing viewpoints. A complex topic such as national health care insurance allows the investigation of political, economic, moral, and legal issues that impact decision making. Students critically consider their own views on diverse topics and compare their views to others.

Nature of Course

A variety of teaching methods are used throughout the course. Lecture time places an emphasis on interaction among students and the instructor. Small group discussions allow students a chance to exchange views with classmates who may have differing views. Class debates are scheduled to allow oral arguments on selected topics for which students have prepared written debate stances. Outside readings, with written summaries, provide opportunities for students to be informed of the latest health news from major news sources. In-class readings and assignments are designed to focus attention on controversial issues and prompt response in discussion. Role playing fosters understanding of health behaviors and decisions that affect each individual.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to be informed class participants for discussion of assigned topics. At minimum, this implies staying current with assigned readings in the textbook and other assigned readings. All out-of-class assignments are due on the deadlines published at the first class meeting. Students must satisfactorily complete examinations, quizzes, and debate papers.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course 

Catalog Description

Historical development of America’s agriculture and the interplay of economic, political, biological and cultural environments of modern America.

Course Content

American agriculture is poorly understood and appreciated by many people with close ties to agriculture; farmers themselves, professional agriculturalists, agribusiness leaders, and political leaders from rural areas. Many of the above seem to think that the present-day agriculture system of the United States economy jumped fully-developed into the twentieth century from some unknown past.

Yes, today’s agriculture provides the raw material food is produced from. Agriculture employs less than one percent of the population in farming, however 23 million or 17% of the population are indirectly employed in agriculture. Agriculture is 13% of our Gross National Product and exports $50 billion annually. Today’s agriculture includes recreation, companion animals, horticulture, and food. Americans enjoy the highest quality food at the most inexpensive rate in the world. Agriculture is America’s and the world’s largest Enterprise.

But this did not happen suddenly. The agriculture sector of the U. S. developed slowly from 1607 to the present. Its development was not easy; it developed over much of the period through trial-and-error in which farmers of one generation learned from the mistakes and failures of the previous generation. The costs of this process in terms of human suffering were huge. However, the physical and natural resources were abundant in the new world. Climatic and environmental conditions were favorable. The desire to acquire and own land was overwhelming. Thus, the earlier trappers, traders, and settlers drove relentlessly on, over nearly four centuries.

Nature of Course

Agricultural development is a cause as well as a consequence of economic development. Agriculture, especially food and fiber production, is the basic foundation for the successful economic development of most industrialized/developed countries. The successful development of a productive agriculture: 1) prevents society-wide starvation and 2) frees people for the development of other socioeconomic aspects desired by that society.

However, Agriculture does not develop independently of other socioeconomic systems. The political system a society adapts and employs is another major factor influencing agriculture development and the overall economic development of that country.

This course provides students the opportunity to study these systems in an integrated manner to better appreciate the history of the United States and Agriculture development. The use of economic resources (land, water, timber, labor, etc.) by the earlier settlers in order to survive and develop agriculture integrates subject matter and principles of the “economic” and “living” systems. The subject matter and principles from “political” system becomes integrated when the student studies the influence of public policy and political conflict upon how and who uses resources in a society. The students will learn to integrate and apply subject matter and principles of the “economic, political and living systems” throughout the course in the historical analysis of American Agriculture to learn: 1) the complexity of the agriculture development process and 2) whence the modern agriculture of the 1990’s comes and the direction in which it is trending.

Student Expectations

  • Regular class attendance, preparation, participation, in class discussion, completion of assignments in a timely manner, and peer evaluation of presentations.
  • Demonstrate their understanding of the topics of discussion and be able to integrate the material on examinations and class activities.
  • Research and write on a selected topic of historical importance to agriculture and present a critical analysis of the impact it had upon the development of a modern agriculture and highly developed society.
  • To participate in a group investigative project and make a 5-7 minute oral presentation (each project member) using appropriate visual aids and multimedia. The project will integrate economic, living and political systems knowledge and approaches to historical and current developments in Agriculture.

Prerequisites

Completion of one course from each of the Economic, Living and Political Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course 

Catalog Description

An analysis and evaluation of societal, behavioral, and cultural influences of gender-related phenomena on women’s and men’s intimate relationships.

Course Content

  1. Introduction
  2. Interpersonal attraction
  3. Gender and Sex
  4. Physical/Psychological Development of Gender
  5. The Social Roles/Cultural Perspective
  6. Adjustment Issues with Gender and Intimacy
  7. Relationship Endings and Gender
  8. Intimacy/Gender and Mental Health

Nature of Course

This course will assist students in developing an extensive understanding and critical analysis of women’s and men’s intimate relationships. In particular, this course will examine the association between gender and intimacy from an interconnected perspective that emphasizes cultural-societal (i.e., Social Systems) influences as well as behavioral-psychological (i.e., Behavioral Systems) influences on how women and men experience their intimate relations. More specifically, this course will incorporate knowledge, concepts, and methods of inquiry from these two perspectives. The overall strategy of the course will be to demonstrate how the dynamic interplay between particular social institutions and gender affects the development of women’s and men’s social relations.

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to attend class; actively participate in the class discussion, oral and written assignments; and make constructive comments on their peer’s work.
  2. Students are expected to prepare a group PowerPoint project, using the resources that they and their group members identify.
  3. Students are expected to present a group PowerPoint presentation to the entire class.
  4. Students are expected to complete the weekly VIDEO assignments.
  5. Students are expected to complete the weekly INTERACTIVE assignments, including their own response and their commentary on another student's response.
  6. Students are expected to perform successfully on the weekly quizzes.
  7. Students are expected to participate in the classroom discussions on the assigned readings.
  8. Students are expected to successfully complete the final exam.
  9. Students are expected to complete any additional written assignments.

Basis for grading:

  1. Preparation Activities for the Group Project (50 points)
  2. Presentation of PowerPoint Group Project (50 points)
  3. VIDEO activities (15 @ 10 points each (150 points)
  4. INTERACTIVE activities (15 @ 10 points each (150 points)
  5. Weekly Quizzes (15 @ 30 points each) (450 points)
  6. Class Discussions (10 @ 5 points each) (50 points)
  7. Final Exam (10 points)
  8. Other Written Assignments (10 @ 5 points each) (50 points)

Total number of class points - 960 points

Prerequisites

Completion of the lower-level General Education requirements in Behavioral Systems and Social Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course 

Catalog Description

An exploration of innovation, opportunity, and new business creation as economic and personal imperatives for success in the global economy.

Course Content

Students probe, question, and evaluate the personal, social, and economic importance of entrepreneurship in the global economy as they acquire the knowledge, skills, and strategies critical for successful start-up and new business creation. Students consider critical foundational topics related to entrepreneurship including assessment of personal style, creative talents, and career interests compared to those of successful entrepreneurs, strategies used to create innovative ideas, methods used to evaluate durable market opportunities.

Nature of Course

This course provides a dynamic, practical, hands-on study of the nature and importance of entrepreneurship in the increasingly global economy and encourages students to immerse themselves in the vision, research, and planning aspects of a new business.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete a variety of readings and participate in classroom activities and discussions, reflect on the class in a weekly journal, complete several small projects and one extended project, and complete two short answer exams.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education requirements in behavioral, economic, political, and social systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course 

Catalog Description

A study of the design of the human built environment.

Course Content

Perspectives on Urban Design will integrate subject matter and approaches to Developing Perspectives on Human Institutions from the areas of “development of a major civilization” and “social systems.” This course will also integrate material relating to Individual Expression by examining the ways in which artistic expression has been an important component in the design of the human built environment.

Nature of Course

This course is designed to introduce students to various aspects of the design of the built environment and of the power of place in our lives. Over the course of the semester we will explore the design of the built environment within its general historical context in order to develop a perspective on why we build cities in the manner in which we do. We will explore the ways in which the human built environment is shaped by the interplay of political, social, economic, and cultural factors and examine major trends in the design of the built environment.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend class regularly, read all materials assigned, actively participate in class discussion, complete all written and oral assignments, including a research paper, demonstrate mastery of course content on examinations, and demonstrate proficiency in using information technology.

Prerequisites

Students should have completed their basic General Education Core, especially the Development of a Major Civilization, Social Systems, and Artistic Expression, and have junior standing.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

Concrete, effective person-to-person communication skills, expressing oneself to gain what is wanted without alienating others, listening to enhance understanding, and navigating conflicts. Also called non-violent communication (NVC).

Course Content

Effective oral communication skills based on Nonviolent Communication (NVC) created by Marshal B. Rosenberg. NVC embodies effective skills for expressing yourself to gain what you want without alienating others. Additional skills support enhanced understanding of yourself (self-empathy) and other (empathy). Skills are unified by a four-step model: observation, feeling, need, and request. NVC is used worldwide to help people solve conflicts peacefully.

Nature of Course

Effective oral communication is integral to any profession, such as social work, science, technology, and business. Over the course of the semester, students will elarn specific techniques of oral communication based on Nonviolent Communication (NVC) as presented by the Center for Nonviolent Communication and Dr. Marshall B. Rosenberg. Communication skills taught in this course are applicable at any level of practice, such as interpersonal, groups, or organizations. Students learn how to qpply techniques in both their personal and professional lives.

The emphasis in the course is on the interface of the category of Oral Expression (how does one communicate) and the category of Social Systems (how does one's communication function in one's social environment).

The course structure emphasizes that communication skills are essential to get one's needs met. However, in getting one's needs met, it is important to consider how one goes about this process. It is not just getting what you need from others, but why one wants others to act, that is important. Does one want another person to feel motivated to cooperate willingly or to comply with requests out of fear? In considering the answers to these questions, one must learn to discriminate in speaking in order to draw others towards him/herself, and to not drive others away.

The course will address the subtheme, "Integration of Knowledge: Living in an Interdependent Universe" as follows. We are dependent on others to meet many, if not most, of our needs. Students learn to consider the effects of their communication. How doe skilled communication work, and what are they ramifications of unskilled communication? Students consider these questions and learn Nonviolent Communication (NVC) not just for the sake of knowledge, but for the purpose of integrating new skills into their daily personal and professional lives.

Student Expectations

  1. Students will complete a research paper and oral presentation on Nonviolent Communication (NVC).
  2. Students will complete assigned readings and all other assignments before class and regularly come to class prepared for discussion. Participation and practice of communication skills is essential for success in the course.
  3. Students will complete exams (one hour mid-term exams and a final exam) at the time they are given in class.
  4. Students will keep a journal of their practice of NVC outside of class and their thoughts on journal articles, discuss practice with other students on Forum, and complete other assignments such as viewing relevant film clips.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

This course will explore professional literacy by introducing forms, methods, standards, and issues central to scientific and technical writing in academic and workplace environments.

Course Content

This course provides students with an opportunity to expand their awareness of professional literacy by introducing forms, methods, standards, and issues central to scientific and technical writing. Both product and process approaches will be utilized with an emphasis on making the transition from academic work to professional world writing tasks. Throughout this course, students will differentiate the conventions of writing and research for various genres; write documents for diverse audiences; develop strategic methods of writing which enhance credibility and effectiveness; analyze and synthesize research from a variety of sources; develop effective methods for collaboration; practice oral communication skills; develop an awareness of and utilize ethical workplace practices; experiment with a variety of technological tools, especially the use of graphics; reinforce usage of Edited Standard English.

Nature of Course

The principle guiding the course structure emphasizes that written communication is an integral component of professional work, whether that work be in science, technology, business, or other fields. Over the course of the semester, this class will focus on how written communication is used by science and technology professionals. Students will learn the many different ways written communication functions in their careers and then apply that knowledge for a variety of purposes and audiences (e.g. writing assignments may include lab notes, literature reviews, proposals, reports, instructions, etc.)

The course combines the perspectives from Written Expression (through written documents), Oral Expression (through oral presentations and collaborative assignments), Living Systems or Physical Systems (through the use of case studies to prompt writing), and Behavioral Systems or Social Systems (through analysis of audience to guide rhetorical choices).

The course will address the subtheme, Integration of Knowledge: Living in an Interdependent Universe through an emphasis on appropriately analyzing audience and communicating effectively. For example, a portion of the course will examine the content and style of communication appropriate to various audiences (e.g. the local community, funding sources, colleagues, the scientific community, etc.) when providing information about a scientific case, and on strategies for making scientific research and proposed solutions to problems accessible to those various audiences.

Student Expectations

  • Attend class regularly
  • Complete all of the assigned reading
  • Take an active role in collaborative assignments (e.g. contributing to discussions, completing work
  • assigned by the group, meeting group-imposed deadlines, etc.)
  • As outlined by case study prompts, conduct necessary research and then complete all written assignments (four major projects-two completed collaboratively and two completed individually; projects will consist of multiple documents including but not limited to correspondence writing, literature reviews, proposals, reports, web pages, informational handouts and brochures, instructions, etc.; impromptu assignments in which students will have a class period to complete a writing task that appropriately responds to a given scenario)
  • Compile a final portfolio consisting of a representative collection of the students' writing and a self reflection on skills learned as evidenced by the portfolio's contents
  • Present a project orally to the class
  • Demonstrate an understanding of course content by applying the skills and strategies learned over the course of the semester to the tasks assigned for the final exam

Prerequisites

EN140 and any course from Behavioral Systems, Living Systems, or Physical Systems. This course will build upon the base level of knowledge attained in these courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

A survey of social, economic and international forces that influence politics of East Asian societies.

Course Content

The primary objective of this course is to survey the governments and politics in East Asia. The goal is to become familiar with the contemporary social, economic, and international forces that influence politics of those societies as well as their historical backgrounds. The course will focus on some common themes across the nations in the region, but we will also look at some issues specific to individual countries.

Nature of Course

 

Student Expectations

  • Active, informed participation in class discussions.
  • Satisfactory performance on examinations.
  • Demonstration of critical thinking skills in all written and oral presentations. (A ten-page research paper and oral presentation based on the paper.)
  • Timely completion of all assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

The history, relevancy, and applications of geotechnology in today’s society. Two hours of lecture and one two hour lab.

Course Content

This course provides an overview of geographic information science (GIScience). This includes knowledge-based computational modeling of activities and processes in the human and natural environments using geospatial data and geographic information systems (GIS) technology. Impacts of GIS technology on individuals and society with respect to past, current and future trends will be examined. Review of discipline-specific applications, along with use of geographic data and GIS software, will be employed for issue analysis and problem solving.

Nature of Course

Geographic Information Science is the field of study which assesses and/or interprets the distribution of natural phenomena and human activities across different scales using geospatial information technologies and methodologies, such as remote sensing and GIS. The complex nature and interrelatedness of said phenomena and activities require multidisciplinary solutions which GIScience addresses. It incorporates recent developments in cognitive and information science into traditional geographic and cartographic approaches of problem solving. Moreover, since GIS methodology is used in dealing with some of society’s most pressing issues, such as crime, health, and disaster response, GIScience draws from other specialized fields like computer science, psychology, political science and anthropology.

Student Expectations

  • Attend all meetings and participate in classroom discussion and lab activities.
  • Graduate students are required to do the latter.
  • Give a minimum of a 10 minute powerpoint presentation of the aforementioned findings/results to the class.
  • Perform satisfactorily on examinations, class assignments and lab activities.

Prerequisites

Completion of core General Education courses in logical systems, physical systems, and social systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

Social and ethical issues and controversies concerning new and evolving technologies in the cyber-world.

Course Content

Cyber-technology refers to a broad spectrum of computing and information technologies that range from stand-alone computers to the cluster of networked computing, information, and communications technologies. The moral, legal and social issues and controversies involving cyber-technology will be discussed. For example, the moral responsibility that directly affects computer and information-technology professionals and users will be examined. The broader social and ethical concerns, such as privacy, security, crime, intellectual property, and Internet regulations that affect each of us in our day-to-day lives are also covered. Questions about the roles and responsibilities of computer and information-technology professionals in developing safe and reliable computer systems are examined. Moreover, students will apply cyber-world ethics to real-life situations and apply existing ethical problems to the cyber-world.

Nature of Course

Students from all academic disciplines use cyber-technologies. They use personal computers, laptops, and handheld devices, and they access the internet. They interact with friends and family through MySpace, Facebook, and Twitter, and they view and upload videos to YouTube. They interact with other people in virtual worlds and participate in multiplayer online games. They complete assignments using Microsoft Word and reference Wikipedia as an encyclopedia. Cyber-technologies, whether emerging or converging, are implanted in many personal items, home appliances, cars, and public transportation. Using these technologies raises some ethical, social, and professional challenges that affect each of us in our day-to-day lives. Issues and controversies that comprise cyber-ethics will be examined. Actual and hypothetical case studies will be discussed where students can bring their own discipline and personal experiences. All students will find many issues covered in this course pertinent to their personal and professional lives. This course integrates the categories of Oral Expression and Written Expression within the Individual Expression perspective. Students in the course will perform public speaking (in the class setting) where they will verbally and nonverbally communicate their ideas and opinions regarding cyber-technology-related ethical issues. They can use evidence, reasoning, and example to elaborate upon their opinions. In this course, a research paper is required and the students will present a summary of their research findings. They will communicate such information while using visual aids. Students will engage in discussions, and debate and advocate their opinions. In addition, written assignments will assess students' ability to relate the material covered in class to their own experiences and case studies in their world. Students will apply discussed and debated cyber-world ethics to real-life situations. They will also relate many cyber-technology ethical issues to variations of existing ethical problems.

Student Expectations

  1. Participate in discussions and activities related to different topics covered in class. There will be weekly discussions engaging students in debates regarding a cyber-technology ethical issue.
  2. Complete 3-4 exams and demonstrate working knowledge of course concepts through satisfactory performance on exams. The exams will consist of multiple choice questions, True/False questions, matching questions, and short essay questions.
  3. Complete weekly short-essay assignments and demonstrate working knowledge of course concepts and ability to integrate personal and non-personal experiences.
  4. Write a research paper on a contemporary cyber-technology ethical issue and present findings. Paper will be 3-5 pages in length, and references should be current refereed articles and/or books. The presentation will be 5 to 10 minutes long.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course&

Catalog Description

Basic concepts in system theory, system models, applications in social, economical, ecological, biological, chemical and physical systems. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour lab.

Course Content

This course covers the basic concepts in system theory: stock and flow, positive and negative feedback. It also discusses logistic growth with carrying capacity, oscillation in linear systems, limit cycle and chaos in nonlinear systems. After learning the simulation software, systems in six different areas will be discussed: physical systems, engineering systems, chemical/biological systems, ecological systems, economic systems and social systems. Students are required to investigate one out of these six areas listed above by constructing s system model and simulation, and then write a project report and give a presentation. In addition, students also need to write three essays on three of the remaining areas.

Nature of Course

This course satisfies the requirements of a 300 level interdisciplinary course because it integrates all three perspectives, and two or more categories within each perspective. Systems can be analyzed at different levels. The highest level is on the fundamental relationship, such as positive and negative feedback, etc. At the next level, mathematics is involved, which describes such relationships in a specific way. At the bottom level is the applications in specific systems. Therefore, systems in different areas can be described by the same mathematic equation, and the fundamental relationships can be found in all the systems. Specifically, the topics of this course integrate Living Systems, Logical Systems, and Physical Systems from the Perspective on Natural Systems, and Economic Systems and Social Systems from the Perspective on Human Institutions. In addition, each student needs to write a project report and give an oral presentation, and thus this course also integrates Oral Expression and Written Expression in the Perspective on Individual Expressions.

Although the phenomena in natural systems and human institutions are quite different, they share some basic system dynamics. First, birth and death are common phenomena, i.e. something seems to appear from nowhere and then grows rapidly, while something else will subside and gradually disappear. Second, there are phenomena with periodic oscillations, such as economic cycles, and chemical clocks. Third, there is competition and collaboration among the entities sharing the same environment, and their relationship will largely determine their survivability.

Student Expectations

  1. Be inquisitive and actively engaged in class activities.
  2. Learn the basic concepts and analyzing methods in dynamic systems.
  3. Learn to use the software to simulate system behavior.
  4. Do homework and practice the simulations.
  5. Gather information and find relevant topics to investigate.
  6. Write three essays on different systems.
  7. Do research and simulation on a selected project, write a report and present the result.
  8. Perform satisfactorily on course exams(s).

Prerequisites

Completion of core General Education courses in logical systems, physical systems, oral expression and written expression is recommended.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

A study of the major artistic components of film and how those components are used to convey ideas and meanings.

Course Content

Film is a powerful medium. Because we learn from youth to "merely watch" film or television as a release or an escape, because we learn to watch passively or unreflectively, because we are not used to film having intellectual, moral, or aesthetic content or purpose, for example, we may totally miss those elements. We may also be manipulated by the medium without realizing it.

By reading the text, watching selected films, participating in discussion, and writing analyses, the student will develop an understanding and appreciation of the various artistic components of film (camera, lighting, sound, composition, mise en scene, and editing, for example) and how those components can be used to convey ideas or meanings. Rather than merely watching, the student will learn to read a film and to understand it as an important art form.

Nature of Course

The course will be a mixture of lecture, discussion, and other approaches. Emphasis will be placed on critical thinking, analysis, and synthesis. The student will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of each of the various components of film, how they communicate ideas or images, and finally how all the parts combine to produce a work of art.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to read assigned material, view assigned films, prepare any assignments, and participate in class discussions and activities.

Grades will be determined by the student's performance in class discussion and activities, daily tests, hour examinations (2 to 3), and papers (2 to 3).

Prerequisites

EN-100 or its equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A study of short stories and novels by significant writers past and present.

Course Content

This course examines the function of the basic elements of fiction and emphasizes the fictional treatment of universal themes such as the individual and society, initiation and maturation, love and conflict, and alienation and the search for faith, in approximately 30 to 40 short stories and one or two novels or novellas. For each thematic unit, students are assigned several readings and some research into pertinent criticism.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to improve the ability of students to read, interpret, talk, and write about fiction competently and confidently. Class work involves a combination of lecture-discussion, small group discussions, reports, in and out-of-class writing, and two or more examinations requiring both objective and interpretive responses. Out-of-class work will include a project in which students might analyze a representative work or works of a given writer or trace a theme in the works of two or more writers.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned material closely and thoughtfully; to attend class regularly and contribute to class discussions; and to satisfactorily complete examinations, quizzes, and other written work.

Prerequisites

EN-100.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Focus on the elements of poetry and the techniques of interpretive reading in a survey of significant poetry.

Course Content

Study of poetic elements (for example, imagery, allusion, and use of sound) and poems selected from various time periods and cultures. Additional materials related to the ideas in individual poems and to the nine objectives of the General Education program will be provided.

Nature of Course

The object is to help students become more thoughtful readers of poetry. This means developing an understanding of the way poems are put together and making qualitative judgments about them, but it also means relating the ideas in the poems to oneself and one's world (the nine objectives). The class includes a variety of activities. There will be some lectures and class discussions, but most of the work will be done in small groups. The atmosphere will be that of an informal workshop. Students will be expected to be active and regular participants in the class's work. In addition to reading and listening to poetry, students will analyze poems for techniques and ideas. The ideas in the poems will be dealt with in assignments involving the nine objectives. The semester project is to compile a personal annotated sampling of contemporary English-language poets. Students will be expected to do some reading aloud (in small groups and in class). There will be some exercises of a more or less creative nature, but students will not be required to write poems.

Student Expectations

Satisfactory performance on three examinations plus the final, on written and oral exercises and reports, on the term project, and on preparation for and performance in class. Tests will consist of objective, short answer, and essay problems.

Prerequisites

EN-100.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A study of mythology and of literature with mythological themes.

Course Content

Utilizing a world mythology textbook and supplementary materials, we will examine such mythic themes as creation, flood, afterlife, gods, and heroes in a variety of cultures and in ancient and modern literature. We will seek to see in myths and mythic motifs the shared concerns of human beings throughout the ages and to appreciate the interrelated mythic elements in such diverse fields as history, archaeology, religion, philosophy, art, and literature.

Nature of Course

We will have regular reading assignments in the textbook and/or in supplemental materials. In addition, students will do some research in subjects that they will pursue individually or in groups with the aim of sharing the results of their research with the class. Class and group discussions will make up much of our class time. The instructor will sometimes lecture on topics about which he/she is knowledgeable, but students will be encouraged to question and comment appropriately. There will be some short (and usually impromptu) writing assignments or other means of responding to topics under consideration.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to do all assigned reading, to participate in class/group discussions, to do some research (with results presented to the class), and to take at least three exams. The exams will be a combination of objective questions and essay. The semester grade will be determined by exam scores (approximately 60%) and by research, class and group participation, and short assignments (approximately 40%).

Prerequisites

EN-100.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Study of best forms of literature for children; development of criteria for judging children's books. Does not count on major or minor in English.

Course Content

Children's Literature is a course in which you will read widely in and about the field of books for children in kindergarten through grade six. The course will focus on the qualities and characteristics of the different types of books for children (picture books, folk and fairy tales, poetry, modern fantasy, contemporary realism, historical fiction, biography, and information books) and on the values of particular books for use with children in terms of their developmental and aesthetic growth.

Nature of Course

The goal of the course is to enable students to become more discriminating readers and selectors of children's books, which means developing an understanding of the literary and artistic elements employed in creating children's books and making qualitative judgments about the books. Although some classes are lecture/class discussion, students will frequently work in small groups, analyzing and evaluating works of children's literature that they have read. Keeping current on the reading (text and children's books) is a must. Library research projects are required.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all readings in the text and of selected books for children, to participate in class activities and discussions, to complete the research projects, and to complete satisfactorily frequent quizzes and a minimum of two major exams plus the final exam.

Prerequisites

EN-100; EL-120.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A survey of literature in all its variety--short stories, novels, poems, and drama. Emphasis on reading, analysis, and writing about literature.

Course Content

Stories and poetry--some of the most exciting that people have enjoyed for many years--are the main subjects for reading and class discussion. All varieties--from the lyrics of popular songs by John Lennon, for example, to the "symphonies" of William Shakespeare, from short stories about life in Ireland or Russia to maybe a novel by Ernest Hemingway--are included.

There will be many short poems and stories that can be read in a few minutes and also a few longer works that may take several class meetings to cover.

Nature of Course

This course will increase the students' pleasure and appreciation of literature as a way to experience and understand life. The course will increase students' ability to speak and write perceptively about literature and life. Because the fictional world pervades real life--even dominates it for many people, via TV if nothing else--skill in recognizing theme is very important.

Good attendance and class participation are needed, so students should try to anticipate class discussion--some of the same questions apply to various literary works and recur in class and on tests. But students are encouraged to also contribute questions and comments that occur to them as they read a given work.

Student Expectations

The student will read (reread if necessary) all assigned materials before class discussion.

There will be short quizzes, exams including essay questions, and a final examination. Some out-of-class readings may be suggested from library materials, and at least one paper requiring research will be assigned.

Prerequisites

EN-100.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLogical Systems

Catalog Description

Introduction to problem solving strategies, sets, whole numbers and their operations and properties, number theory, numeration systems, computer usage, and the historical significance and applications of these topics in the K-9 mathematics curriculum.

Course Content

  • Mathematical Reasoning
  • Pre-number Concepts, Numeration, Number Systems
  • Whole Number Computation
  • Number Theory
  • Geometric Shapes
  • Review and Assessment

Nature of Course

The primary purpose of Mathematics I is to develop in a logical, patterned approach, the elements, properties and operations of the number systems taught in elementary/middle school (grades K-9). The essentials of problem solving and the logic of mathematics are introduced, followed by a development of number concept. Relations, operations and fundamental properties of various number systems are examined. These number systems are the counting numbers and whole numbers. Attention is paid to applications of these systems as practiced today in the elementary/middle school curriculum including the use of appropriate manipulatives and computer software. In addition, some historical applications and informal geometrical relationships are explored. Many instances of the concepts are cited as an elementary/middle school teacher would encounter them.

Mathematics I is taught in a lecture-discussion and/or small group setting with many applications and problems being the focus of the discussion. The problems in the textbook will be the main source of assignments the students will be expected to complete outside of class. Some assignments including library and internet research, laboratory "hands on" projects and individual writing may be made. These assignments should promote a better understanding of the elementary/middle school curriculum.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions, to work problems in and out of class, to take all quizzes and tests and to do the outside assignments.

Prerequisites

Credit for MA101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of 'C' or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher. Declared education major in elementary, early childhood, exceptional child, middle school, or secondary mathematics or human environmental studies: child development option major.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLogical Systems

Catalog Description

A sampling of topics which mixes mathematics history, its mathematicians, and its problems with a variety of real-life applications.

Course Content

  • Hand Calculators
  • Set Theory
  • Logic and Proofs
  • Computers and Systems of Numeration
  • The Real Number System
  • Algebraic Models
  • Geometry and Trigonometry
  • Consumer Mathematics
  • Counting Methods and Probability
  • Statistics

Nature of Course

The course will attempt to make mathematics informative and practical and will stimulate the creativity of the liberal arts student. While the topics will be presented in a straightforward and interesting manner, thought and activity on the part of the student will be necessary. The course is designed for liberal arts students, not for students planning to study advanced mathematics.

The course is taught in a lecture-discussion setting with topics, applications, and problems being the focus of the discussion. Problems from the textbook will be assigned. Reading and written assignments will also be made.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend all class meetings, participate in discussions, complete reading and written assignments, solve assigned problems, and perform satisfactorily on quizzes and examinations.

There will be at least three one-hour examinations and a final examination. A number of shorter quizzes may also be given.

Prerequisites

Credit for MA101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of 'C' or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLogical Systems

Catalog Description

Real numbers and their operations, properties, and applications, number theory, numeration systems, algebraic properties, graphing, statistics, probability and their historical importance. (General Education course) (4)

Course Content

This course satisfies the Logical Systems requirement of the General Education Program and meets the first mathematics course requirement in any PK-9 teacher education degree program. The primary objectives are to: Identify and use problem solving strategies. Describe and distinguish among the various number systems, including historical perspectives. Define the four fundamental operations on real numbers in terms of sets, describe and model the conceptualizations of each operation, and describe multiple algorithms for each operation. Describe numbers based on their properties, perform divisibility tests, and find greatest common factors and least common multiples of at least two numbers. Identify different aspects of the philosophy, history, cultural significance and nature of mathematics illustrated in the PK-9 curriculum. Apply numerical methods to the study of probability and descriptive statistics

Nature of Course

Students will be able to create a word problem for each of the four basic non-negative rational number operations along with appropriate representation (model) for each. Students will be able to identify and write a remediation plan for a student error pattern involving rational number operations. Students will be able to convert between and operate in different numeration systems.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to contribute to class discussions, to work problems in and out of class, to take all quizzes and tests and to do the outside assignments.

Prerequisites

Declared education major in elementary, early childhood, exceptional child, middle school, or human environmental studies: child development option major. ACT Math subscore of 15 or higher or MA050 with a grade of 'NDC' or higher or MA 102 with a grade of ‘C’ or higher or a required score on an appropriate COMPASS placement test. Students with an ACT Math sub score below 22 will co-enroll in MA018.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

4

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLogical Systems

Catalog Description

Functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, binomial theorem.

Course Content

  • Functions and Graphs
  • Polynomial and Rational Functions
  • Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
  • The Conics
  • Sequences and Series

Nature of Course

The primary purposes of College Algebra are to develop problem-solving capabilities that follow logical patterns and to provide the essential algebraic background for work in other fields or courses. The main mathematical topics in this course are functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, sequences, and series. The historical development of these topics, as well as applications to life and culture, will receive emphasis where appropriate.

College Algebra is taught in a lecture setting. However, there is much interaction between students and the teacher through examples and problems, worked and presented in class. The teacher presents situations to the students that require reasoning intended to produce better problem-solving skills. Problem sets in the textbook constitute the main source of assignments to be completed outside of class, but the students may be asked to complete reading assignments from sources other than the textbook, write on topics of a mathematical nature related to the history of the solution of a particular problem, or use computer based programs to develop solutions to problems.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to provide and use a graphing calculator (similar to the TI83), to participate in class discussions, and to work problems both in and out of class. Normally at least 2 hours of work is needed to complete each class assignment. Performance on scheduled tests constitutes the major part of the course grade.

Prerequisites

Credit for MA101/102 and a passing score on the Intermediate Algebra Assessment, MA 095 with a grade of 'C' or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 18-20 with MA 095 placement score of 14 or higher, or ACT Math subscore of 21 or higher.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

An examination of the media in the United States, emphasizing what impact they have upon society.

Course Content

The purposes of this course are

  • To provide a broad overview of the mass media processes, as shaped by both media managers and society.
  • To provide a broad overview of the mass media and their impact on society.
  • To help students become discerning consumers of the products of the mass media.
  • To develop the critical thinking skills necessary to evaluate issues that appear in the media.
  • To develop an appreciation for the contributions made by women and minorities to the media and media-support professions.

Nature of Course

In order to provide a contemporary overview of all media, this course includes lectures, discussions, written assignments and critiques of the news and entertainment media to emphasize mass media impact on life and culture in the United States.

Student Expectations

  1. All students are expected to complete required readings and participate in class discussions.
  2. Students will complete two writing assignments that compare and contrast newspaper articles on specified topics and a paper that analyzes the content of national broadcast television news.
  3. Students will complete four examinations (objective/essay questions).

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

An analytical examination of representative musical works since 1827 with emphasis on understanding the manipulation of musical symbols and its effect.

Course Content

Three class periods per week will be devoted to the examination of a musical work, during which the historical, political, aesthetic, and artistic "climate of the times" will be explored and related to the work. This relating will involve the intent of the artist, the means and vocabulary employed, and the effectiveness of the result. A short paper will summarize the investigation of each work examined. Also, each will research and produce a short summary of a musical period, style, or "school" each week.

Nature of Course

Music's vocabulary consists of symbols which are consciously made use of by musicians to evoke a response in the listener. In some cases, the desired response is political or religious; while in others the musician wants to share an emotion which s/he feels. By examining music whose effect is predictable within our culture, we try to learn what in the structure of the work provokes this effect. Active discussion and writing are central to the format; and all exams are essay.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to participate in all class sessions and discussions, to examine each example under study thoroughly to determine its symbolic, affective, and musical impact on the listener or perceiver, and to complete all written assignments and examinations successfully.

Prerequisites

The ability to read music.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

Fundamentals of music in resources and practices of Western and non-Western cultures.

Course Content

The course will examine basic music theories and will test those theories on the music of different time periods and cultures. The first section of the class presents the theoretical elements and parameters of music: pitch, rhythm, timbre, dynamics, melody, and harmony. The second section of the class deals with analytical studies of music to examine how the development of music was affected by language, dance, concert presentations, drama, and Modernist aesthetics.

Nature of Course

The course presents three ways of "getting to know" music: through analysis, through synthesis, and through cultural context. After students have learned the parameters of music they will analyze musical examples to determine how these parameters change as the music progresses. They will reverse the process to synthesize music that has the same characteristics as the analytical examples. Finally, broader theories concerning the nature of music will be presented and tested through the analysis of musical examples and the synthesis of similar music.

Student Expectations

The students will be expected to complete a number of analytical assignments, one musical composition project, and a short paper (one to two pages). There will be frequent reading assignments from the textbook, three examinations and a final examination. Students will be graded according to the correct identification of musical elements in the analytical projects. The composition projects will be graded according to the degree of faithfulness to the assigned musical model and on the use of correct musical notation. Student papers will be graded on the strength of the argument backing up the paper's thesis.

Prerequisites

None, but a strong knowledge of note reading is necessary. Previous musical performance experience is recommended.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsEconomic Systems

Catalog Description

Engineering economy topics include the effects of the time-value of money, concepts of equivalence, replacement analysis, cost/benefit analysis, tax consequences and cost of capital depreciation related to a manufacturing or engineering environment.

Course Content

  • Making Economic Decisions
  • Incremental Analysis
  • Engineering/Technology Costs
  • Depreciation
  • Interest and Equivalence
  • Replacement Analysis
  • Present-Worth Analysis
  • Rate of Return Analysis
  • Estimation of Future Events

Nature of Course

Students will be exposed to the economic decision-making tools relevant to engineering and technical disciplines in the United States.

Students will gain insight on how government regulations directly influence private and public sectors of industry.

Students will use practical applications (projects) to understand the economic ramifications of short- and long-term capital expenditures.

Student Expectations

  • Class attendance and participation are strongly encouraged.
  • Students are required to read the assigned chapters for discussion.
  • Students are required to apply prerequisite mathematics knowledge where warranted.
  • Students will complete all assignments (presentations, written papers and online discussions) in a timely fashion. Late work is unacceptable.

Prerequisites

MA-134 or MA-135.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

A course in music appreciation which develops informed judgment about music through exposure to live performance.

Course Content

Musical Encounters is a performance based course which will enhance the participant's knowledge and understanding of music through listening, class discussions, group composition and performance. Students, who participate in the course, will develop a greater enjoyment of music and an increased understanding of the process of creating and performing music. No previous knowledge of music is needed, assumed, required or expected of participants in this course.

Evaluation in this course is performance based. Students will be evaluated on their concert attendance and the quality and thoroughness of their written performance critiques, their participation in class discussions, their successful completion of the listening assignments, and their successful completion of the group composition project. There are unscheduled, written examinations in this course.

Nature of Course

Attendance at live musical performances is a major component of the activities of this course. Students must plan their schedules to attend performances throughout the semester. Students will be expected to submit formal written critiques of the performances according to the elements of music defined and discussed in class and to discuss each performance in class. Recorded listening assignments will be employed to demonstrate, develop and reinforce the students' understanding and knowledge of the elements of music. Students, in groups, will compose, perform and critique, in class, an original work which demonstrates their understanding of the elements of music.

Student Expectations

  • Attend the student/performer interaction session for each concert attended
  • Submit evaluations for a specified number of those performances
  • Participate regularly in class discussions
  • Successfully complete all listening assignments, and
  • Successfully complete and perform the group composition project.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

An examination of music as artistic expression and an analysis of the role music has played in the human experience.

Course Content

  1. Introduction and Orientation to art music (The basic elements of music and how they function)
  2. Baroque Period (1600-1750) (An explanation of music from this time)
  3. Classical Music (1750-1820) (A discussion of music and composers from the classical era)
  4. Romantic Period (1820-1890) (An investigation into music composed during the 19th century)
  5. Modern Music (1890-present) (Stylistic approaches to twentieth century music)
  6. Music in non-western cultures (Music from India, Africa, and Japan)

Nature of Course

The course presents music as artistic expression and includes an analysis of the role music has played in the human experience.

Student Expectations

  • Present in writing, critical reactions to three to four concerts and do various in class writing assignments.
  • Listen regularly to assigned musical compositions and be able to discuss the stylistic elements of each composition.
  • Participate regularly in class discussions.
  • All students will be evaluated on the content, grammatical and syntactical accuracy of written assignments; successful completion of examinations; and the quality of oral presentations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

A journey through the various languages of Jazz - America's unique art form - and the societal developments that have influenced Jazz music in the U.S.A.

Course Content

Each of the main currents in the development of Jazz will be covered, including Dixieland, Swing, Bop, Cool, Fusion and so on. Artists that students will encounter range from Louis Armstrong, through Count Basie and Duke Ellington, to Charlie Parker, Miles Davis and contemporary performers. A feature of this course will be the placing of each Jazz style into its specific time and place in the history of this nation. Students will experience Jazz and its contexts through recordings, video performances, guest performers in class and performances on campus.

Nature of Course

This course will comprise a mixture of lectures, guest performances, discussions and many performances on disc or videotape by legendary Jazz performers. There will be regular quizzes involving both written and aural analysis, an emphasis on writing - both formally and informally, and a concluding multimedia group project based on one particular era in the evolution of Jazz.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to attend all class meetings, and successfully complete all written assignments, the frequent quizzes and the final multimedia project.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

The study of interrelationships between society, culture, values and sport, and the ways in which they influence one another.

Course Content

Sport and Society provides a historical overview of the development of sport in America. It pays particular attention to the social and cultural sources contributing to the rise of sport in this country, and how sport then in turn both promotes and reflects the American value system. It also examines the symbiotic relationship that exists between sport and other societal institutions such as religion and politics. Finally, it closely examines societal ills such as racism and sexism and the extent to which they are prevalent in the world of sport.

Nature of Course

Sport and Society is a lecture/discussion class which examines the extent to which sport serves as a microcosm of American society. Students will be expected to take a stance on issues discussed in class which deal with the extent of racism and sexism in sport, and the use of sport to promote political systems. They will be expected to defend their stance through position papers, oral presentations, and class debates.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to:

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in discussions.
  2. Complete all written assignments.
  3. Participate in one class debate.
  4. Present one oral report.
  5. Complete all examinations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

The aesthetic and technical aspects of photography within an overall sociological construct are examined. Black and white photos are produced.

Course Content

  1. Compare differing cultures as typified through photography.
  2. Understand the moral, legal, and ethical implications of photography.
  3. Differentiate between different kinds of photographic media.
  4. Judge and identify quality photographs during class critiques.
  5. Create photographic prints that demonstrate an awareness of accepted societal standards.
  6. Apply knowledge from Psychology, Sociology, Art and Technology to produce quality photographs.
  7. Screen images on a contact print to determine which, if any, to enlarge.
  8. Demonstrate an aesthetic awareness by composing (arranging) elements for photographs.
  9. Select finished photographs that represent an aesthetic awareness objective.
  10. Analyze photography's impact on society.
  11. Produce photographs that are socially acceptable.
  12. Utilize tools of communications to compose and reproduce graphic materials for communications (TG-3).
  13. Develop a working knowledge of safety standards and apply appropriate safety procedures.

Nature of Course

Mix of lecture/discussion and lab.

Student Expectations

Like most courses taught in the Department of Industrial and Engineering Technology, this class includes a rigorous program of academic study and applied exercises. Lab sessions will be conducted in which the instructor will perform demonstrations and discuss photography techniques and issues raised in lectures and critiques. It is important that the significance of the assignments is understood. Group and individual critique sessions are essential components of the overall learning process. Therefore, regular attendance at all class sessions is essential.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsPhysical Systems

Catalog Description

An introduction to the concepts and principles governing the natural physical world and their relation to society. Emphasis on developing an appreciation for the role of science in our life. Does not count on a major or minor.

Course Content

This course shows how we encounter physical principles in our everyday lives. It introduces concepts of matter, space, and time. Methods of measurement are discussed. Concepts of motion are explored from the Aristotelian and Galilean points of view. The concept of energy is introduced. Various forms of energy are described, and the principle of conservation of energy is formulated. Interchanges among heat and work and kinetic, potential, electromagnetic energy are illustrated with applications to our daily experiences. Wave motion is introduced in connection with sound waves and electromagnetic waves. The perception of sound and the perception of color are explained in terms of wave motion. Physical phenomena which seems at odds with our perception of events are explained. Classroom demonstrations highlight the course.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: In addition to reading assignments in the textbook students may be asked to locate and read relevant journal articles in the library and peruse newspapers for articles relating to topics studied in the course.
  2. Emphasis on Writing: Students will be required to write a paper near the end of the course that exemplifies physical concepts learned in the course.
  3. Group Projects and Out-of-Class Projects: Several of the laboratory experiments and classroom projects will be done in groups or teams. In addition, there may be simple home experiments or projects that are brought to class for presentation and discussion.
  4. Teaching Format: A variety of approaches will be used in the classroom including formal lectures, group projects and discussions, demonstrations, and the use of audiovisual and computer materials. Students are expected to be actively involved in all aspects of the course.

Student Expectations

Student evaluation will be based on student participation in classroom activities and group projects, completion of laboratory exercises, satisfactory completion of homework assignments and satisfactory performance on examinations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsPhysical Systems

Catalog Description

An examination of the physical nature of planets, stars and galaxies, their interrelationships and evolutionary processes. Emphasis on the role of scientific inquiry in our present understanding of the Universe.

Course Content

A major theme of this course is the radical change in our perception of the Universe over the ages, culminating in our present understanding of the Universe and the Earth's place in it. Accordingly, our present state of knowledge of the Cosmos is approached from an historical perspective. The student will learn how the people of ancient times interpreted the motions of the Sun, Moon and Planets, and how the contributions of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo and Newton revolutionized our understanding of the Universe. Since this will be a first science course for many students, a great deal of emphasis will be placed on the methods astronomers use to learn about the Universe. The laws of physics are the astronomer's most important tools, and the student will develop a qualitative understanding of the law of gravity, the nature of light, and the structure of the atom. Armed with these tools, the student will learn about the physical nature of planets, stars, galaxies, and other objects which populate our Universe. Spacecraft exploration of the solar system, the life cycles of stars, the origin and eventual fate of the Universe, and the possibility of extraterrestrial life are just a few of the topics which will be addressed in the course.

Nature of Course

Classroom presentations will include formal lectures, group discussions, demonstrations, and the use of slides and videotapes. In addition to regularly scheduled laboratories, evening "stargazing" sessions will be held on many clear nights during the semester.

Students will be required to write a short paper on a topic of relevance to astronomy. Students with special capabilities may elect to do a research project instead of a term paper. Students may use a combination of cameras and telescopes to help in their observations.

Student Expectations

Course grades will be based upon 4 one-hour exams, a comprehensive final exam, 10 laboratory exercises, term paper, and several short homework assignments. A number of astronomy-related films will be available for viewing outside of class, and attendance at these films will result in extra-credit points.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsPhysical Systems

Catalog Description

Concepts and principles of natural phenomena, including mechanics, work and energy, rotational motion, waves and thermodynamics, with emphasis on the investigative processes. Four lectures and 1 two-hour lab.

Course Content

This is the first course of a two semester introductory physics sequence. The students will meet four hours per week for lecture and once a week for a two hour laboratory for five hours of credit.

Introductory Physics I is intended to provide the basic concepts, facts and methods of problem solving in physics. The lecture is based on a set of unified concepts of mechanics, waves and thermodynamics. The laboratory will help you understand the value of observation and measurement in physics. The lecture and the laboratory are one course. Topics and concepts are introduced in either the lecture or the laboratory and may be expanded in either format.

Acquiring and consolidating a knowledge of physics requires understanding rather than memorization. The laboratories will provide an opportunity to have hands-on experiences in linear and rotational mechanics, waves and sound, and thermodynamics. The lab and lecture will provide methods of thinking through problems.

Nature of Course

This course is made up of four lectures and 1 two-hour laboratory. Introductory Physics I emphasizes the understanding of the concepts through lecture and laboratories. The laboratories are of the problem solving type and not just replication. The student must pass the laboratory to pass the course. The grading scale is based on a cumulative score of lecture and laboratory points. A percentage of these points based on total points possible represent a grade.

Student Expectations

The students will show progress in meeting the course objectives by:

  1. Regularly attending all lecture and laboratory sessions.
  2. Actively participating in all problem solving, classroom discussions and investigative laboratories.
  3. Performing and reporting on laboratory activities.
  4. Demonstrating personal responsibility by completing well organized, written classroom and laboratory assignments.
  5. Achieving acceptable scores on tests, quizzes, laboratory reports and laboratory practical exams.

Prerequisites

MA-133 and MA-134 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

5

Perspectives on Natural SystemsPhysical Systems

Catalog Description

Major topics include atomic structure, elements and compounds, chemical reactions, mechanics and energy concepts of heat, light, sound, electricity and magnetism. Does not count for a physics major or minor.

Course Content

This course is designed to acquaint students with basic concepts and principles from chemistry and physics that can be used to teach physical science in the elementary school. Eight weeks of the course are devoted to chemistry and include topics such as properties of matter, atomic structure, physical and chemical changes, chemical reactions and acids and bases. The other eight weeks of the course are devoted to physics and include topics such as mechanics, heat and temperature, wave motion and sound, electricity, magnetism, and light.

Nature of Course

The course consists of two regular one-hour class sessions and a two-hour laboratory session. Classroom presentations will combine a variety of approaches including formal lectures, group projects and discussions, demonstrations, and the use of current technology. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on activities which incorporate the inquiry/discovery mode in both the classroom and the laboratory. The applications of chemistry and physics to everyday life and to advances in technology, including the benefits to mankind, will be emphasized when possible.

The laboratory will provide an opportunity for students to make measurements, gather and analyze data, and draw conclusions based on their experimental investigations. They will be asked to locate and gather information outside the classroom and analyze this information. As a result, students will be asked to complete a project dealing with some issue related to physics or chemistry, where they must analyze alternative ideas and hypotheses and come to a conclusion.

Student Expectations

Student evaluation will be based on (1) active participation in classroom activities, group projects, and laboratory exercises (2) quality of laboratory reports and the investigative project report satisfactory completion of homework assignments and (4) satisfactory performance on examinations.

Prerequisites

BS-118.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

An exploration of the main issues in philosophy through philosophical and literary readings.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to both traditional and contemporary issues in philosophy through a study of original philosophical and literary works. In addition to becoming acquainted with the main issues and methodologies of philosophy, students will learn to appreciate the meaning and significance of philosophical ideas and theories, develop skills in critical thinking and logical argument, and learn the art of reflective reading and writing.

Some traditional issues addressed in philosophy are: What is knowledge? What is truth? What is science? How is the mind related to the body? How can we know whether God exists? Can we have objective knowledge or right and wrong? Do human beings free will? Some contemporary issues addressed in philosophy are: Can machines think? Is the mind a computer program? What is consciousness? Are all standards of conduct relative?

Nature of Course

There is a significant emphasis on reading, writing, and discussion. Reading assignments are usually original works which should be thought of as subjects of investigation rather than as textbooks from which information can be retrieved. Writing assignments are regularly made and often require students to write about the readings or issues under discussion. Philosophy is a conversational mode of inquiry and active participation in both class discussion and on-line computer conferences is expected. Essay questions are a component in all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, participate in class discussion, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final exams. Students should also expect to write one or more short papers, as well as to do some elementary research in the library.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsLogical Systems

Catalog Description

A formal study of argument and inference, emphasizing the application of symbolic techniques to ordinary language.

Course Content

Logic is the science of argument and inference. Logic allows one to distinguish good inferences (those that reasonable people ought to accept) from bad inferences (those that reasonable people ought to reject). This course focuses on one important subset of inferences, deductive inferences. The course introduces the concept of deductive validity and then develops techniques for determining whether a particular argument is valid. A good deal of time is spent developing a formal machinery for argument analysis. Techniques for translating ordinary language arguments into the formal machinery are developed at length.

Some of the topics to be covered include:

  1. Language, Logic and Argument
    1. Recognizing arguments
    2. Analyzing arguments
  2. Deductive Validity
    1. Propositional logic
    2. Syllogistic logic
    3. Predicate (relational) logic
  3. Inductive Reasoning
    1. Probabilistic reasoning
    2. Analogical reasoning
  4. Deontic Reasoning
    1. History of moral reasoning
    2. Moral reasoning formalized
    3. Legal reasoning

Nature of Course

This course is geared toward the development of formal techniques and methods for the application of those techniques to ordinary language. Heavy emphasis is placed on skill development and on understanding central logical concepts. Accordingly, class sessions are a mix of lecture-discussions and Socratic examination of students. Exercises are frequently completed in class, with students being called upon both for answers and for explanations of their answers. Students should be prepared to devote 5 (five) hours per week of study time to this course.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance (be prepared to be called on in class).
  2. Maintain a Logic notebook.
  3. Complete routine homework assignments (25% of class grade).
  4. Three hourly examinations (objective, problem-solving, short essay). (50% of class grade to be determined on basis of exam performance).
  5. Comprehensive final examination (25% of class grade).

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

An introduction to the concepts, theories, literature, methods of criticism, and modes of perception appropriate to understanding the arts, developing aesthetic attitudes, and making reasoned aesthetic judgments.

Course Content

The course is a critical study of the nature and aesthetic qualities of painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, drama, music and film. It attempts to identify the nature of art and artistic activity, to distinguish different art forms, traditions and genres, and to understand the relation or art to cultural values. The course will also investigate the concepts of artistic form, expression, representation, and creativity, and study the nature and function or art criticism.

Nature of Course

The course combines lecture, discussion, assigned readings, and viewing, listening to or participating with selected artworks. It aims to acquaint students with the main concepts and traditions in thinking about the arts, their place in society, and the nature and importance of aesthetic experience. It seeks to develop the ability to think, write and speak critically about the arts, to encourage the development of aesthetic attitudes and perceptions, and to develop the ability to make reasoned aesthetic judgments. Some prior acquaintance with the arts may be helpful but is not required.

A regular amount of reading and reflection is required on a regular basis. Homework assignments consist of short essays based on the reading assignments. Some out-of-class activities such as attending films, concerts or art exhibitions may be involved. The teaching format is informal lecture, with a focus on discussion and analysis of important works, concepts and theories.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend class regularly, read assigned texts, prepare homework assignments or take-home quizzes, and engage in discussion both in class and on-line. They should plan to attend such films, concerts or art exhibitions as may be appropriate, and to do some outside listening, viewing and reading. Among the regular assignments, students will be asked to write a review or analysis of a work of art, a description or analysis of aesthetic experience, and a short work of art criticism. In addition to the homework assignments there are two midterms and a final examination. Exams include an essay component.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsBehavioral Systems

Catalog Description

A normative study of human behavior and conduct including an examination of ethical theories and theories of moral development.

Course Content

The course examines various theories, principles and systems which prescribe how human being ought to live their lives in personal, social and civic contexts. In addition to basic theories of human nature and psychology, the course focuses on five traditional normative theories: ethical naturalism, religious ethics, utilitarianism, the ethics of pure reason, and contractual ethics. The structure and content of each theory will be examined and evaluated for consistency and coherence, practical applicability, and compatibility with psychological theories of moral personality. Finally, the relation between normative theories and theories of moral development is examined. Additional topics studied in the course are theories of value, justice, punishment, free will, and responsibility.

Nature of Course

The course aims to develop an understanding of the nature and content of normative ethical theories, how they are distinct from scientific and descriptive theories, and how they may be applied to problematic situations for the resolution of conflict, guidance of choice and decision, and the determination of responsibility and merit.

The course combines lecture and discussion of assigned texts. Students will be expected to do a good deal of reading out of class, and should be prepared to discuss and apply the readings to case situations. Students should devote five to six hours per week to this course outside the classroom. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in discussion both in class and on-line. Students should also expect to write one or more short papers on assigned topics, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final examinations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

perspectivescategory

Catalog Description

A study of basic concepts theories and issues in the organization of society, with attention to the problems of justice and economic distribution.

Course Content

The course examines different theories about how society ought to be organized, the origin and limits of social authority, the nature and needs of human beings, and the criteria for evaluating social arrangements. The course will typically address the following points.

  1. Man as a Social Animal
    1. Human nature and human needs
    2. How ought society to be organized to satisfy human needs?
  2. Human Nature and Legitimate Social Authority
    1. What is social authority?
    2. Human nature is inconsistent with legitimate social authority
    3. Human nature is consistent with legitimate social authority
      1. Classical Greek theories
      2. Early Christian theories
      3. Renaissance theories
      4. Enlightenment social contractarians
      5. Post-enlightenment social liberalism
      6. Post-enlightenment social conservatism
      7. Contemporary theories of the person in society
  3. Human Nature and the Problem of Relativism
    1. Relativism cultural and philosophical
    2. Cultural relativism and the methodology of the social sciences
  4. Justice and Economic Distribution
    1. Justice as desert
    2. Justice as fairness
    3. Justice as equal distribution of benefits and burdens

Nature of Course

This course is geared toward developing an understanding of various normative ethical theories, and the ability to apply those theories to problematic situations. Classes are a combination of lecture and discussion, and students will be expected to do considerable reading outside of class. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in class discussion. Students should also expect to maintain a notebook, write one or more short papers on assigned topics, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final examinations. No term paper.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsPolitical Systems

Catalog Description

Institutions and processes of national and state government, including an analysis of the United States and Missouri Constitutions.

Course Content

A study of the design and underlying principles of the American political system, including the United States Constitution and Missouri Constitution, the separated powers arrangement of three branches of government, and the major linkage institutions (political parties, interest groups, mass media, and organized political movements).

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: The class will involve a textbook as well as an issues or policy book which debates the pros and cons of contemporary political issues.
  2. Group Projects: May be assigned by the instructor.
  3. Emphasis on Writing: Significant; the class will include essay exams as well as writing exercises which promote critical thinking.
  4. Out-of-Class Projects: A library assignment in conjunction with a course paper.
  5. Teaching Format: Primarily lecture, question and answer.
  6. Other: Students will be expected to make a 5-10 minute oral presentation.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class.
  2. Take notes.
  3. Participate in class discussion.
  4. Complete examinations and other class assignments.
  5. Demonstrate computer conversancy.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsPolitical Systems

Catalog Description

The institutions, cultures and practices of democratic and nondemocratic governments, including the United States, and an analysis of the Missouri Constitution.

Course Content

A study of the U. S. political systems in a comparative setting. The course will focus on the Constitutions and governing documents of major countries around the world. Furthermore, the course will address the decision-making institutions of the nations, including the legislative, executive, and judicial bodies. In addition, the class will focus on the Constitution of Missouri.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: The class will involve a textbook as well as a supplemental theoretic reader to highlight central political issues.
  2. Group Projects: May be assigned by the instructor.
  3. Emphasis on Writing: Significant; the class will include essay exams as well as writing exercises which promote critical thinking.
  4. Out-of-Class Projects: A library assignment in conjunction with a course paper.
  5. Teaching Format: Primarily lecture, question and answer.
  6. Other: Students will be expected to make some oral presentation.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class.
  2. Take notes.
  3. Participate in class discussion.
  4. Successful completion of essay exams.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsBehavioral Systems

Catalog Description

Examination of human behavior and experience from a psychological perspective. Application of psychological principles to understanding of human behavior.

Course Content

This course covers the basic concepts and principles of psychology as applied to a variety of human behaviors and experiences. The student will become acquainted in a systematic and comprehensive manner with theory and research pertaining to the major areas of psychology. Topics typically covered include theories of personality; learning and memory; social behavior and interpersonal attraction; developmental processes over the life span; motivation and emotion; coping, abnormal behavior and therapy; sensation and perception; and ethical issues in research. Through the study of these various aspects of human behavior and experience, the student should acquire a fuller understanding of his/her own behavior.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to foster the development of critical thinking and communication skills related to human behavior and experiences. This will be accomplished through the use of lectures, reading of the text, class discussions, group activities, and class projects. By participating in these activities, students will have the opportunity to increase their knowledge of human behavior and then to use this knowledge to place their own experiences in better perspective.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to perform satisfactorily on examinations and assignments and to participate in class discussions and projects. Examinations include both objective and written items.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsBehavioral Systems

Catalog Description

An overview of the social, cognitive, physical and emotional changes that occur from conception to adolescence. Application of principles of development to the understanding of child development and behavior.

Course Content

This course will present an overview of the social, cognitive, physical, and emotional development of the child from conception to adolescence. Theoretical, empirical, and practical perspectives on child development will be presented and integrated. Cultural and historical variations in the concepts of children and of development will be discussed as they relate to differences in the treatment of children.

Nature of Course

The teaching format will combine lecture and discussion styles in the classroom, and independent learning experiences outside the classroom. Students will be expected to read the text and may be assigned some additional readings in preparation for exams and for class discussions and projects. Students will complete one or more course projects that will include written and/or oral reports. Evidence of critical thinking and effective communication will be emphasized.

Student Expectations

Students' understanding of material in the text, any supplemental readings, and classroom discussions will be assessed by examinations. These may consist of multiple choice, matching, completion, or essay items. Brief quizzes may be given at the discretion of the instructor.

Student evaluation also will be based on informed participation in classroom activities/discussions and satisfactory completion of all outside projects/writing assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Natural SystemsBehavioral Systems

Catalog Description

Broad overview of human development across the life-span. Reciprocal nature of the individual/environment interaction is emphasized.

Course Content

This course is intended to provide a survey of physical, intellectual, social and emotional development across the life span. Particular emphasis will be placed upon examining the interrelationships which exist among these areas of human development in light of present and past socio-cultural influences.

Nature of Course

The course will combine lecture and discussion formats in order to stimulate critical thinking about development across the life span. Students will be expected to read the textbook as well as relevant professional articles which relate to the subject matter. Students may be asked to summarize and integrate this material with their own experiences through various writing assignments/activities. Students will be expected to participate in group discussions which are organized around particular topics/themes affecting human beings as they proceed through the life span.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to demonstrate their knowledge of and ability to apply information they have learned on tests, in discussions, and in their writing assignments. Students will be asked to demonstrate preparation for formal discussions and a willingness to participate in both formal and informal discussions.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Study of leisure and its impact on contemporary culture, diverse populations, and the lives of individuals.

Course Content

RC-100 examines the concepts and philosophical implications of leisure, work, play, games and recreation and how these concepts affect and reflect the lives of individuals and members of different societal groups. Students will examine the benefits of recreation and leisure as well as the constraints and problems sometimes associated with leisure. A feature of this course is to analyze individual patterns of participation and become familiar with developing life plans for leisure.

Nature of Course

RC-100 combines lecture, discussions, assigned readings, role playing, debates, problem solving activities, and student presentations. Students are required to research specific topics of interest to them by finding relevant literature and observing people involved in related leisure pursuits. Students are also required to document and analyze their own time use patterns to understand how their behavior patterns relate to the larger culture to which they belong.

Student Expectations

  1. Each student will participate in all class meetings and complete pertinent assignments and readings prior to class meetings.
  2. Each student will fully participate in experiential learning experiences as described by the course outline at the beginning of the semester.
  3. Each student will achieve satisfactory grades on tests, papers, oral presentations, class activities, and other assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

A study of major world religions, including an examination of various definitions and characteristics of religion as exemplified in the histories of religions and their impact on societies.

Course Content

Class lectures and reading assignments follow the textbook. The course materials cover indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Particular attention is given to the dynamic relationship between religion and its cultural setting. Attention will also be given to the growth of new religious movements.

Nature of Course

Students will be required to read the textbook in preparation for class lectures and discussions, as well as additional source materials related to the significant sacred literature of each religion.

In order to develop research and writing skills, each student will be required to write a short paper on the subject of what constitutes religion, and a medium-length paper on a new religions movement. In addition, each student will be required to compile a scrapbook with entries from each of the major world religions. Through reading assignments, written projects and classroom discussions students should receive a sound understanding of the religions of the world and develop an appreciation of their own and others' religious heritage.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in class discussions. In addition to the reading assignments and written projects, there will be two in-class examinations and a final examination. The examinations contain a mixture of completion and fill-in-the-blank statements, and may contain one or more discussion questions. Study sheets are provided for each major religion, and ample time is provided during class to ask questions for additional information and clarification.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A study of the literary genres and historical contexts of the New Testament writings.

Course Content

New Testament Literature is a study of the various writings which comprise the New Testament. Some of the topics to be covered include:

  1. Social and Religious Context
    1. Canon, Text and Transmission of the New Testament
    2. Judaism in the First Century
    3. Hellenistic Thought and Culture
  2. The Genre of Gospel
    1. The Genre of Gospel: Form and Purpose
    2. Study of Individual Gospels
    3. The quest for the Historical Jesus
  3. The Genre of Apostolic History
  4. The Genre of Epistle
    1. Paul
    2. Pauline Epistles
    3. Catholic Epistles
  5. The Genre of Apocalyptic
  6. Epilogue: Non-canonical Writings

Nature of Course

This course is geared toward developing

  1. a general knowledge of the collection of literary texts known as the New Testament and
  2. the ability to apply different methods of interpretation and literary criticism to the writings of the New Testament.

A variety of teaching strategies are utilized in class sessions. Students should devote 5 to 10 hours per week of study time to this course.

Student Expectations

  1. Read the New Testament and a Textbook
  2. In-Class Discussion Pages
  3. Resource Assignments
  4. Analysis of an Article
  5. Creative Writing Exercise
  6. Group Project
  7. Three Examinations

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

A historical and critical study of the literature of the Old Testament, using methods of modern biblical scholarship.

Course Content

Old Testament Literature is a study of the various writings which comprise the Old Testament. Within this ancient collection, different types of literature are identified. An attempt is made to apprehend and understand the original context and intended purpose of these ancient writings. Some of the topics to be covered include:

  1. Literature of the Torah
    1. Primeval narratives
    2. Ancestral sagas
  2. Literature of Liberation, Law, and Ritual
    1. Exodus/Sinai narratives
    2. Historical narratives
  3. Literature of Prophetism
    1. The prophet and the oracle
    2. The oracle as literary expression
    3. Prophetic oracles of the Old Testament
  4. Literature of Praise, Worship, and Spiritual Inquiry
    1. Hebrew Poetry
    2. Practical wisdom literature
    3. Speculative wisdom literature

Nature of Course

This course is geared toward developing

  1. a general knowledge of the collection of literary texts known as the Old Testament and
  2. the ability to apply different methods of interpretation and literary criticism to the writings of the Old Testament.

Students will be expected to read selected passages from the Old Testament in addition to the textbook. Class sessions are primarily lecture with discussion encouraged. Students should devote 5 (five) hours per week of study time to this course.

Student Expectations

  1. Active participation in class sessions.
  2. Complete two examinations: a mid-term and a final.
  3. Complete four exercises in Literary Text Analysis.
  4. Complete two journal article reports.
  5. Complete an Experiential Learning project.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

The development of proficiency in oral communication through the study of rhetorical theories, principles, and strategies.

Course Content

Because there are few professions for which effective communication skill is not important, this course is potentially valuable to any student, regardless of major.

The course is designed to acquaint students with the basic principles of effective oral communication and, more importantly, to give students first-hand experience in sharpening their communication abilities. The goal of the course is to teach students to make intelligent rhetorical choices.

Course content includes the types and functions of public speaking, classical rhetorical theory, delivery and nonverbal communication, style, organization, use of evidence and reasoning, strategies of persuasion, informative speaking, visual aids, the role of speaker credibility, and motivational appeals.

Nature of Course

  1. Emphasis on Reading: The primary source of reading assignments is the textbook, but students are also expected to do outside reading in connection with a semester project (see below) and in researching their classroom presentations.
  2. Group Projects: Team or group projects may be assigned. For example, the argumentative speech is frequently done with a partner as a debate.
  3. Emphasis on Writing: Students are required to submit complete outlines of the speeches they present. In addition, students will submit a brief rhetorical analysis of a significant instance of public discourse.
  4. Out-of-class Projects: Students are expected to prepare their presentations and papers outside of class. Classroom time is devoted to treatment of communication principles and to presentation and discussion of students’ speeches.
  5. Teaching Format: A variety of teaching formats, including lecture, in-class exercises, and group discussion are utilized. The primary teaching format involves student presentations.
  6. Other: The department believes that effective communication skills are crucial for personal and professional success and that they can be learned by anyone, regardless of previous experience or natural ability. By the same token, the department does not believe that skill in communication is merely a knack or a talent. Rather, its development must be based on sound theory and principles. While instructors strive to create a non-threatening classroom atmosphere, hard work and concerted study are required to develop effective communication abilities. The department rates the course as "moderately difficult."

Student Expectations

  1. Classroom Presentations: Typically, over the course of the semester students are required to present 3-4 speeches including:
    1. Speech of introduction. 2-3 minutes
    2. Expository speech (to inform on a significant subject within the General Education categories of either Natural Systems or Human Institutions). 5-8 minutes
    3. Argumentative (debate) speech (may be done with a partner) on a question of judgment. 5-8 minutes
    4. Persuasive speech (advocating a policy or solution to a problem). 7-10 minutes
  2. Examinations: Typically, two exams, a mid-term and a final, usually of the objective type, are given.
  3. Papers: A rhetorical analysis of a significant speech or other form of rhetoric from American or world history is required.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

A course that adapts principles of effective public speaking to the online environment and evaluates students' application of those principles.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to the basic theory and principles of speech preparation and presentation in face to face and online settings. The course will increase students’ understanding of the communication process and the ethics involved while enhancing their appreciation of public discourse and how it shapes and is shaped by events, especially in a democracy.

Students will improve the ability to think critically about messages they encounter as well as those that they produce. Students’ will improve the ability to gather and evaluate information as they contemplate issues of public controversy, and to use that information responsibly in their own discourse, while improving listening/feedback skills. Also students will develop greater critical skill in the selecting, developing, and communicating of meaningful ideas.

Nature of Course

This class will most notably integrate subject matter and approaches from areas catalogued under “Perspective on Individual Expression” and “Perspective on Human Institutions.” Material relating to Oral Expression and Written expression will assist the production and language devices. Material relating to Development of a Major Civilization, Political Systems, and Social Systems will inform a speaker’s understanding of audience(s) and how to adapt a message.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned material, participate in online discussions, and perform satisfactorily on unit tests. Also they will complete assigned papers and presentations satisfactorily, including locating and gathering quality research materials upon which they formulate and develop ideas, properly citing all sources.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Consideration of the elementary principles involved in effective person to person communication.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to various principles and theories of communication and how they apply to the interpersonal context--that is, in communication between two persons, in terms of speaking and listening as well as relational development and wellbeing. In addition, contextual factors, such as culture/environment, will be examined in terms of their implications for communication and relationships. Students will learn what contributes to one's effectiveness as a communication partner, including challenging situations such as disagreement and conflict.

Nature of Course

The course emphasizes "active" learning strategies wherein students learn through experiential activities rather than through straight lecture/readings. For example, students will reflect upon how they would communicate in various hypothetical situations. In addition, students will complete various nationally-normed instruments to help illuminate their communicative tendencies--especially in terms of what could be considered effective and ineffective practices. Quizzes, tests, and papers will require knowledge and application of the various concepts discussed in readings and in classroom discussion.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to 1) complete all assigned reading material; 2) participate in all class discussions, exercises, and activities; 3) perform satisfactorily on examinations and quizzes; 4) complete all assigned papers and presentations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

Exploration of race, ethnicity, social class, and gender issues in schooling today.

Course Content

The study of diversity issues in the schools is explored through a variety of perspectives. The formation of the cultural composition of the United States serves as an introduction to the course. Particular focus is then given to conceptual frameworks of racial, ethnic, social class, and gender identity development, current equity issues, and post-modern critiques of schooling.

Nature of Course

The course involves a significant amount of reading and writing. Assigned reading comes primarily from the textbook and reserve materials. These readings draw from the literatures of schooling, ethnic history and identity development, and post-modernist studies. Assigned writing varies from informal reflective pieces to formal essays and term projects. It is expected that the writing will demonstrate both creative and critical thinking skills. Group projects include informal debates and role plays. Class sessions are mainly interactive, combining short lectures with small and whole group discussions. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to actively contribute and participate in these discussions.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to 1) complete all written, oral, and group assignments in a timely manner; 2) actively prepare readings and research for participation in class; 3) show satisfactory performance on the exams.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Acquisition of an appreciation of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples and study of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish.

Course Content

Students learn to pronounce Spanish words and to use basic vocabulary and structures. Structures include present tense of regular and common irregular verbs, negative and interrogative structures, articles, and prepositions. Students will learn basic Spanish vocabulary needed to function in a Spanish speaking environment.

Students will compare structures in Spanish and English, such as subject-verb agreements, word order, notions of gender, formal and informal address, etc. They will be called upon to use critical thinking and analytical skills.

Cultural content is an important part of the course. Students will learn basic geography and become familiar with features of daily life: food, shopping, university life, cultural life, etc. They will engage in guided out-of-class activities, including library projects and supplementary reading in English. Cultural awareness and interrelationships are discussed.

Nature of Course

This course combines an introduction to the study of the Spanish language with a study of some major aspects of Spanish culture.

Emphasis is on the use of Spanish in oral communication situations, e.g., asking questions, describing daily activities, food, weather, numbers, time expressions, etc. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice, slides, and reports on Spanish films.

Student Expectations

The course includes frequent quizzes and exams over Spanish vocabulary and structures. Students will be expected to write brief reports in English on cultural topics.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of the culture of Spanish-speaking peoples through the practice of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish.

Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 3 credits under the Department of Foreign Language Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course continues the study of Spanish language and culture. Emphasis is placed on developing increased proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish.

Students learn the structures of the language, as well as the cultural context of the language, through practice of oral communication situations. Structures introduced at this level include narration in the past, the use of descriptive adjectives, and the subjunctive. Students will be expected to master the use of these and other structures. The cultural content of the course will be integrated with the oral communication activities. Students will master certain cultural skills and knowledge through the appropriate use of the language in context.

Nature of Course

This is a participation course in which students increase their oral communication abilities in Spanish and become acquainted with the cultural context of the Spanish-speaking peoples. Class activities involve oral assignments, pronunciation practice and reports on Spanish films. The class is conducted mainly in Spanish.

Student Expectations

Students will participate in individual and group projects both in and outside of class, using materials in the textbook and resources available on campus. The course includes quizzes and exams over Spanish vocabulary, structures, and culture. Students are also expected to write brief reports on cultural topics or films. Grades are based on a composite of students' oral and written performance as well as their demonstration of cultural knowledge and understanding.

Prerequisites

SN-100 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

Continued study of Spanish language and culture. Cultural, conversational, and structural activities leading to increased proficiency and cross-cultural awareness.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had very good high school preparation in Spanish (3-4 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 6 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

This course builds on students' previous knowledge of Spanish to develop proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Major aspects of Hispanic culture and contemporary Hispanic life are included in the material presented.

The course consists of regular assignments from the textbook for recitation in class, as well as written homework and oral presentations in Spanish. Also included are readings from outside sources and listening comprehension activities in the language laboratory.

Nature of Course

The class emphasizes an active approach to learning. Student involvement and participation in class is essential. In addition to material assigned for class preparation, individual or group culture projects may be assigned.

Student Expectations

There are frequent quizzes and exams in class, as well as written and oral assignments and projects. Grades are based on a composite of students' written and oral performance and a demonstration of their knowledge and understanding of Hispanic culture. Students will also write reports on Spanish films.

Prerequisites

SN-120 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionLiterary Expression

Catalog Description

Designed to develop ability to read Hispanic literary texts; to acquaint students with a selection of major Hispanic authors; to introduce basic concepts of literary analysis; to increase students' ability to speak and understand Spanish through class discussions in Spanish.

This course is open to beginning freshmen who have had exceptional high school preparation (4-5 years). Students who complete this course as their first course in Spanish are eligible to receive an additional 9 credits under the Department of Foreign Languages Retroactive Credit policy.

Course Content

Students will read a selection of representative works of Hispanic literature. Emphasis will be on vocabulary building, developing strategies for reading comprehension, and recognizing some literary devices and techniques.

Nature of Course

This course introduces students to basic strategies for approaching Hispanic literature and develops the vocabulary needed to read Hispanic texts with an increased degree of skill and ease. Students become acquainted with different literary styles and authors of Hispanic literature. There is heavy emphasis on class discussion of the works studied.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all reading assignments and to participate in class discussions of the readings. Regular homework assignments, quizzes and exams test students' ability to read and understand Hispanic literary texts. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish.

Prerequisites

SN-200 or equivalent.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

A series of lectures, projects and group discussions analyzing the impact of society and culture on human social behavior.

Course Content

The impact of society and culture on human behavior is analyzed. The effects of values, social institutions, and culture on the human experience is emphasized within a scientific framework. In the concluding part of the course, the material will be evaluated and applied to selected controversial social issues.

Nature of Course

  1. Teaching format: A series of lectures, reports and group discussions will be used in the classroom.
  2. Emphasis on reading.
  3. Individual oral reports and group projects may be assigned by the instructor.
  4. Emphasis upon enhancing critical thinking.

Student Expectations

Attend class, take notes, participate in class discussions and role play, and satisfactorily complete class assignments and examinations. Examinations will normally include both objective and essay type of questions. Contact the individual instructor for more information.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

An analysis of urbanization, including city life and problems, land use patterns and the future of the city.

Course Content

The city as a way of life including norms, values, and relationships to material objects and the city as an ecological system including land use patterns and other aspects of the city as a geographic unit will be examined in this course. Theories and other conceptualizations of these two dimensions will be discussed and used to explore, clarify and examine possible solutions to specific social problems. Perspectives on the implementation of the solutions, including politics and city planning, and the future of the city will also be discussed. Domestic and world-wide illustrations will be used to clarify the concepts utilized in this course.

Nature of Course

Lecture, class discussion, and the textbook as well as specific class exercises will be used to clarify concepts and to introduce students to methods which can be used to study the city. Short writing assignments will allow students to conceptualize urban frameworks, to explore their use in solving urban problems and to express their ideas in written form.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate in class discussion.
  2. Read all assigned materials.
  3. Demonstrate mastery of course content on four examinations.
  4. Timely completion of two short written assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionOral Expression

Catalog Description

This course emphasizes the development of competence in interpersonal communication through the study of verbal communication principles and strategies, helping strategies, and the influence of gender and culture on communication.

Course Content

Basic concepts, principles, and skills of interpersonal communication are studied with a particular focus on how the skills can be used in helping others. Both intellectual understanding and practical application of communication and helping skills are emphasized. Topics covered include cultural and gender-based influences on communication, perception, self-perception, empathy, language strategies, body language, listening skills, effects of emotion on communication, relationships, conflict, and family communication. Through study of these topics and practice with the skills involved, students will have opportunities to become more aware of issues in interpersonal communication and helping. They will also have opportunities to assess and enhance their own communication skills and effectiveness.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to develop an understanding of the principles of communication and the skills needed to be an effective communicator. It will include lecture, readings in the text, class discussion, communication skill practice in class and skill-based homework outside of class. Assignments will include two abstracts of communication articles and a term paper on a communication or helping skills related topic. During the class period, there will be frequent communication group meetings to discuss a topic or practice a skill. Outside of class, students will try out their skills and write reports on their progress. Students will also view film segments in class to analyze communication strategies and skills.

Student Expectations

Regular class attendance is of particular importance due to the communication groups and the skills training that are an integral part of the course. Students are also expected to read assigned materials, complete assignments on time, participate in class discussion and communication groups, and take all examinations. Because of the interactive nature of the course, it is also expected that students will strive to interact with one another in ways that foster the ability to learn and the comfort level of everyone in the class.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsSocial Systems

Catalog Description

This course explores knowledge, understanding, affirmation and respect for people from diverse backgrounds within their cultural contexts at the interpersonal level.

Course Content

Understanding Social and Cultural Diversity introduces conceptual and factual information regarding social and cultural diversity to promote understanding, affirmation and respect for human differences. One's own culture and personal values, as well as the context of dominant culture and its affect on various social and cultural groups, is examined. Particular emphasis is given to recognizing one's own culture and privilege and the effect of these factors on identity development and interpersonal relations.

Nature of Course

Much of the course is taught in a lecture format however, there is considerable emphasis on group discussion and student interaction.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to finish all required readings on time and come to class prepared to share ideas and discuss the assigned readings. The class includes tests, group discussion, and written assignments. Students are expected to actively engage the material while exploring their own cultural heritage, attitudes, values, and privilege.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

Promotes an appreciation for and an understanding of theatre in contemporary society. Emphasizes the script, artist, audience interaction.

Course Content

TH-100 looks at how live, film, and video drama affect and reflect our lives and society. Generally, discussion centers around theatre as an art form as well as theatre in everyday life. The course follows a structural approach, stressing how dramatic experiences are put together.

TH-100 contains six major blocks of material. A section on the audience focuses on the role the spectator plays in the theatre experience. A section on theatrical genres considers different types of dramatic literature. A section on the environmental and visual elements of theatre looks at the various physical spaces where theatre activity happens as well as the technical theatre areas of scenery, lighting, costuming & make-up, and sound. A section on playwrights and dramatic structure studies scripts and the way they are put together. A section on acting and directing investigates the core of all theatre activity, the actor-audience relationship. The last section brings together all the elements which create the total theatre experience.

Nature of Course

The course utilizes a combination of class discussion of assigned reading and oral and written exercises based on that reading. Required observation of theatre in daily life, live plays, film and videoplays also provides much of the basis for discussion of theatre skills and principles. An independent study component offers the opportunity to apply acquired knowledge; such projects might include playwriting, acting, technical duties and projects, public relations for theatre, as well as more traditional academic projects. Projects are determined in conference with the instructor.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class, departmental dramatic productions, and, when available, some films and professional productions.
  2. Do assigned readings.
  3. Satisfactorily complete class assignments and examinations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Individual ExpressionArtistic Expression

Catalog Description

Acting as a form of self-expression. Emphasizes personal awareness, relaxation, concentration, coordination and integration, vocal skills, and scene study.

Course Content

Course work begins with a Stanislavski-based sequence of mental, physical, and vocal exercises in which students learn the basics of creativity, relaxation, physical action, objectives, working against physical and psychological obstacles, focus, observation, and internal and external relationships, all of which lead toward the creation of building a fully developed character.

Work then proceeds through improvisational scene study, non-content scenes using minimal dialogue, and selection, study, and preparation of a final scene using scripted material from actual plays.

Nature of Course

The course uses instruction in acting as a means of encouraging self-development. It stresses three areas of study: Relaxation - opening, freeing, loosening, and releasing exercises provide tools through which the student may eliminate extraneous behavioral and intentional tensions and improve conscious functioning, self-awareness (as opposed to self-consciousness,) and poise. Work in relaxation helps the student (1) develop awareness of mental and physical tensions and, thereby, begin to (2) eliminate unwanted distraction. The central goal of work in concentration is improved ability to pay attention. Imagination - exercises which emphasize the uses of the five senses, observation, active remembering of past experiences, and active awareness of present experience provide tools through which the student may stretch the facility of vision, of imagining. Work in imagination helps the student (1) awaken to and, finally, (2) loosen unwanted creative limitations.

Student Expectations

  1. Active participation in daily work.
    1. Practice of solo exercises and techniques.
    2. Partnered exercises.
    3. Workshop rehearsal of scenes.
    4. Preparation of daily journal entries.
    5. Preparation of daily reading assignments including preparation of textbook exercises.
  2. Scene Preparation and Performance.
    1. Scene selection from three plays read and studied.
    2. Regular out-of-class rehearsal during final month of class.
    3. Preparation and presentation of formal written analyses of play, character, and scene.
    4. Presentation of scenes as part of mid-term and final examination.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

First Year Introductory Course

Catalog Description

An academic skills-centered seminar which introduces students to the General Education Program and the value of liberal education while addressing one of a variety of themes. See First Year Experience web site for themes (https://www.semo.edu/firstyearsem). Required of all students entering the university with fewer than 24 credit hours.

Course Content

This course is designed to equip students with skills and intellectual dispositions which will enable them to succeed in their academic careers. Primary focus will be placed on the ability to locate and gather information, the ability to engage in critical thinking, and the ability to express oneself orally and in writing. Each section of the seminar will address a particular interdisciplinary theme, a topic or body of knowledge which students approach for the purpose of developing their skills in acquiring and using information. The theme provides a context for academic investigation and student self-expression.

Because UI-100 serves as the introduction to Southeast's General Education Program, it also leads students to explore the value of liberal education and to understand the goals and structure of the General Education Program which constitutes a significant portion of their undergraduate experience. While learning about General Education and academic planning, students will also explore career options related to academic majors they are interested in and learn how to connect academic planning and career planning.

Nature of Course

The First Year Seminar is not a lecture course designed to acquaint students which technical information concerning a particular academic subject. UI-100 is an activities-based course which requires students to engage in individual and small-group learning projects. The interdisciplinary nature of the themes in UI-100 requires students to conduct research activities using information technology, to approach new knowledge in an open-minded yet analytical fashion, and to develop strategies for independent decision-making.

While specific course projects will vary according to the announced theme and students may select themes which appeal to their personal or professional interests, all sections of UI-100 will address common goals and will perform similar academic inquiry and critical thinking exercises.

Student Expectations

Students will perform research-based written and oral presentations, both formal and informal, engage in critical thinking activities, conduct library and/or web-based investigations, reflect on the meaning and value of a liberal education, and prepare long-term and short-term academic plans of study based on career goals. Because the seminar format relies on small-group collaborative projects and whole-group discussion activities, class attendance and participation are essential.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary coverage of psychoactive drugs from the perspectives of psychopharmacology, history, and criminal justice.

Course Content

This course examines the major classes of psychoactive drugs and their use in cultures past and present. Specific drugs studied include cocaine, amphetamine, nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, heroin, barbiturates, valium, marijuana and hashish. Special topics such as designer drugs, undercover investigations, drug use during the war in Vietnam, and DEA operations in South America are also covered. The history of psychoactive substance use/abuse across cultures and the response of governments and legislatures in attempting to control and regulate public access are major themes of the course.

An understanding of drug use and addictive behaviors also requires an awareness of physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of these substances on the human brain and body. The basic principles of psychopharmacology are covered, following each drug through administration, absorption, distribution and final elimination from the body. These topics in psychopharmacology and the physiological basis of addictive behaviors are considered fundamental in helping the student reach a responsible, informed and critical view of psychoactive substances in their current historical and cultural context.

Nature of Course

The course involves considerable lecture material and assigned readings, but there is also emphasis on discussion and student interaction in class. Selected guest speakers with extensive knowledge of drug addiction, law enforcement or drug treatment provide opportunities for students to query experts directly. Round table discussions with the instructors provide a format for students to share thoughts on the course and their concerns/interests.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussions.
  2. Give a brief oral presentation as part of a class debate.
  3. Complete a term paper and one small paper.
  4. Complete 4 exams.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An examination and application of appropriate managerial communicative techniques for leading others to perform well in various organizational contexts.

Course Content

This course examines theory and application from the disciplines of communication and management and operates on the premise that effective managers are effective communicators. Communication-management skills are examined and applied to a variety of interpersonal, group, and audience contexts. Communicative techniques pertain to oral reporting, interviewing, problem-solving, goal setting, coaching and listening. These skills are practiced in a variety of group and individual settings to meet work-related challenges.

Nature of Course

A wide variety of communication-management experiences are provided in the class. Both individual and group learning opportunities are stressed in course assignments. Class participation and involvement are required. Analytical application of course content is achieved by means of a research paper which is required to link a communication component with a management application.

Student Expectations

  1. Active participation in classroom discussions and group assignments.
  2. Satisfactory completion of a research paper, an oral report over that paper and two research bibliographies over group project topics.
  3. Demonstration of creative, energetic and team oriented leadership behavior in two group projects.
  4. Satisfactory performance on examinations.

Prerequisites

SC-105 or an equivalent introductory oral communication course.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A seminar studying the past and present experiences of women in diverse culture to enhance the human experience.

Course Content

Students in the course will explore the experience of being female in today’s world through the lenses of various disciplines. An appreciation for the gains of feminism will uncover an awareness of growth yet to occur. Students will be given the opportunity to connect discrimination to current injustices and identify future moves on the path to equality.

Nature of Course

Students will be able to gather traditional and alternative sources of information, demonstrate the ability to locate and gather print and multimedia evidence showing the array of female personality. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by analyzing the influence of women on global issues. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills in presentations that highlight future outcomes for women in society. Through economic, political, social, and behavioral perspectives, demonstrate the ability to integrate new understandings about the female experience with traditional and contemporary paradigms.

Student Expectations

  1. Active participation in classroom discussions and group assignments.
  2. Satisfactory performance on examinations.

Prerequisites

Oral Expression; Written Expression. (3)

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A normative and descriptive examination of the role of the courts in contemporary American society via the principles of judicial reasoning.

Course Content

This course is a normative and descriptive examination of the principles of judicial reasoning. Attention is given to the roles of logic, economics, history, intuition, precedent, and analogy in judicial reasoning.

Courts resolve complex disputes. Just how course should do the job--the proper role of the courts in society--is a matter of some dispute. The course examines the role of courts in society through a study of the principles that underlie judicial decisions. Specifically, the course examines the diverse factors--statutory, logical, historical, economic, political, social, and psychological--that actually enter into making a judicial decision, and examines whether such factors should play a role.

The course examines the view of judicial reasoning known as mechanical jurisprudence, which holds that logic alone should be used in making decisions. Mechanical jurisprudence is an alluring theory (as is its close relation in constitutional law, the theory of original intent), but one that is deeply flawed. A well-made judicial decision (regardless of the specific area of law in which the decision is made) is a careful mix of logic, history, psychology, economics, social theory, and politics.

This is not a course in law. Rather it is a course in meta-law. It is about law and courts as instruments of social control and change. Analytical philosophical techniques, including formal logic, are employed throughout the course.

Nature of Course

This course is both reading and writing intensive. Students will be expected to do a good deal of assigned reading, as well as a good deal of independent reading. The reading material is often complex, so students should be prepared to devote at least six hours per week to the reading assignments. Class sessions will combine lecture and discussion, and students should be prepared to participate actively in class discussions. Essay questions are a component in all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in class discussions. Students will complete two papers: one expository and one analytical. In addition, students will prepare a brief class presentation. There are two midterms and a final examination.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and completion of lower division General Education curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

American film as both historical and literary document from its origins to the present time in feature films, television, and documentaries.

Course Content

The course is designed around both a genre approach to film (war, westerns, science fiction, musicals, crime) and an examination of the ways American films have viewed particular problems and groups (e.g.. African-Americans and gender). The course explores the proposition that films can sway public opinion and values, reinforce stereotypes, and are, at best, mediocre historians.

The particular films and topics vary from semester to semester. Usually there are three areas under investigation. In 2006 those areas will be the African-American experience in feature films, westerns as history and metaphor, and science fiction. Four “must see” films will be selected from each area spanning the period from 1915 to the present.

Nature of Course

This is both a discussion and laboratory class. One or more lab sessions will be established for viewing films.

Student Expectations

To help develop skills in information gathering and written communication, each student will be required to do a research and writing project using the skills learned in the course to analyze one film. The textbook will be supplemented by readings distributed to the class.

Prerequisites

Development of a Major Civilization and Literary Expression.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A geographical analysis of world landscapes utilizing physical, cultural and economical concepts to illustrate complex interrelationships existing between various regions.

Course Content

The cultural and physical environments of the world will be evaluated with analytical techniques in order to understand better the geographical similarities and differences between major regions of the world. Contemporary problems and space utilization will be examined. Social problems (e.g. over population, population shifts, literacy, agricultural production and distribution, have and have not nations) will be studied. The interdisciplinary nature is achieved through the integration of Physical Social, and Economic Systems.

Nature of Course

Reading of the textbook and outside assignments in Kent Library are necessary to be a participant in class discussions. Evaluation of maps, graphs, and statistical charts will be interwoven through the course. There will be out-of-class group projects and a term paper to be completed by each student. Each student must actively participate in the group projects. Projects, the term paper, and class participation account for 25% of the course grade. Examinations account for 75% of the final course grade.

Student Expectations

  1. Group Projects--actively participate in the following:
    1. Library work and
    2. Field exercise.
  2. Short Writing Assignments--meet the appropriate deadlines.
  3. Term Paper--meet the appropriate deadlines.
  4. Class Participation
    1. Lecture
    2. Oral presentation of written work.

Prerequisites

Physical, Social and Economic Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary study of the causes and effects of crime and delinquency.

Course Content

This course examines the possible causes of crime and delinquency from an interdisciplinary perspective. It attempts to integrate information from such diverse disciplines as anthropology, biology, criminal justice, criminology, economics, psychology, and sociology. It studies crime and delinquency from a historical, as well as from a cross-cultural perspective.

Each of the various explanations of crime and delinquency are compared and contrasted along the following dimensions: (1) assessing its claims objectively; (2) searching for flaws in its logical presentation; thinking through its implications; and (4) applying its implications to political and social issues. An attempt is then made toward the end of the semester to synthesize these explanations into a coherent, integrated theory.

Nature of Course

This course has significant reading and writing components. In addition to the assigned readings, each student will complete two to four written assignments concerning a correlate of crime and/or delinquency. Class sessions will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, and students should be prepared to participate actively in discussions.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in discussions.
  2. Complete four examinations with short-answer and essay components.
  3. Complete four brief written assignments.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education requirements in the following categories: Behavioral Systems and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An examination of the musical experience of the American people as manifested in folk, ethnic, jazz, and pop music, and music in the fine art tradition.

Course Content

The American Musical Experience is a one-semester attempt to take in the broad spectrum of American culture and history using music as our entry. While much of the thrust of the semester's work will be to become better acquainted with the historical and developmental aspects of America's musics, we will not ignore their numerous cultural, aesthetic and formal/structural elements. Music criticism and music appreciation (in the broadest sense of both ideas) will be encouraged and refined through reading, listening, discussion and reflection.

This course is a "TOPICS" course, rather than a broad chronological survey of American Music. The semester will be divided into a series of subject areas, each dealing with a specific aspect in the history of American music. Possible topics include American Musical Theater, Music of Native Americans, The Anglo Tradition in American Music; The African-American Tradition in American Music; America Goes to War--Music from WWI, WWII and Vietnam; The Blended Tradition--Rock, Soul & Pop; From Florida to California--Latin Musics in America. Each semester will begin with a general introduction to musical terminology and the tools of critical listening. Following this introduction, the rest of the semester will be divided between two or three subject areas.

Nature of Course

The American Musical Experience will utilize musicology, cultural anthropology, iconography, organology, and history. By the semester's end, students should have more than a passing acquaintance with the tools, materials and critical/analytical machinery of musicology, a field built on the concept of interdisciplinary scholarship.

Students are expected to develop an understanding of the chronology and general themes of American music through their reading of the course textbook and supplementary readings as well as listening to assigned pieces. Class time will be spent in lecture and discussion based on more in-depth consideration of particular aspects of the listenings and readings.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend all classes.
  2. Complete all reading and listening assignments prior to class.
  3. Participate in class by contributing to discussions with observations, questions and responses that are germane to the subject at hand.
  4. Pass three examinations on the dates listed on the course calendar. These exams will include essay questions and analysis/critique of listening examples.
  5. Write one (1) research paper on a specific topic from the area of American music.

Prerequisites

At least Junior status (completion of 60 credits or more) and ability to read music.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Contemporary issues will be analyzed and placed into historical perspective. Emphasis on use of the historical method for analysis.

Course Content

Understanding current issues requires the individual not only to know the nature of the issue, but also to be able to place it in its broad historical perspective. Students will learn to identify enduring issues, to understand the techniques researchers employ to analyze such topics, and to develop skill in use of the historical method. The course also encourages students to compare the historical method with the approaches used by specialists in other disciplines. Guest lecturers will share the tools and perspectives of their disciplines with the class. Topics will vary from semester to semester depending on the expertise of the faculty member(s) teaching the course, availability of outside experts as lecturers, and student interests. Possible topics include crime and punishment, international terrorism, human rights, utopian societies, medical experimentation, or the occult.

Nature of Course

This course is organized in a discussion format. Students are expected to read from a variety of sources and to share that information and their conclusions about the information with the class.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to participate actively in the identification of enduring issues and the pursuit of multiple approaches to understanding and solving them. Students will produce a brief position paper on each topic studied. In addition, each student will analyze one issue in depth, demonstrating understanding of the nature of the issue and of the methodology by which it might best be studied. The final presentation will allow the student to demonstrate analytical skills and knowledge of the historical method.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and successful completion of the categories: Development of a Major Civilization, Social Systems, Behavioral Systems, Written Expression and Oral Expression or by permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A study of the historical and literary culture of African-Americans from the slave experience to the twentieth century.

Course Content

The African diaspora wrenched Africans from their homes and brought them to work as slaves in America. In the more than two centuries of slavery, the culture of America and the African-Americans themselves was irreversibly changed. The course will center around this experience and follow the freedmen into the twentieth century.

Besides the literary/historical material, the course will reflect some very broad themes that have been consistently important in the African-American experience.

Nature of Course

The course attempts to weave together the experience recorded by those who research the facts (historians) with those who tell the story (novelists/poets/playwrights/ filmmakers) of a people.

The teaching method used will be largely lecture-discussion. Throughout the semester students will be challenged to think about and analyze issues dealing with the experience of African-Americans. The discussion method will be employed extensively for maximum student involvement.

Student Expectations

Since this is an examination of African-American life from both a historical and literary perspective, it will be necessary for students to read from both disciplines. The textbook will be augmented by literary materials. There will be three examinations and a research project required of each student.

Prerequisites

Development of a Major Civilization; Literary Expression.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Theoretical and "hands on" experience with musical applications of electronics and computers.

Course Content

This course presents an examination of the production of music using electronic means and an exposition of the uses of electronics and computers in music research, music printing, and musical data storage. In depth discussions of audio electronics, acoustics, computers and computer languages are included in the course as well as expositions of musical topics.

The first section of the class consists of an overview of electro-acoustic music describing how the technology of electronic music evolved. The second section of the course deals with the use of computers to manipulate musical data. Both sections stress the scientific principles behind the technology. Recorded musical examples will demonstrate uses of the technology and will help to show the relationship between technology and aesthetic trends.

Nature of Course

Only a moderate amount of reading will be expected of the students (a 218 page textbook). Writing will be limited to a short paper (5 to 10 pages) and essay questions on the examinations. Two creative projects (an electronic music composition and a short computer program) will occupy much of the students' time outside class. The projects will require 3 to 10 hours of work each. Much of the work on these projects requires the specialized equipment found in the music department's Electronic-Computer Music Laboratory. This is a shared facility. Students will need to schedule judiciously time in the laboratory in order to finish their projects. Class sessions will mix discussions of trends, techniques, and principles with hands-on demonstrations. While an interest in music of all kinds is desirable, no previous musical training is necessary.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend all class sessions.
  2. Complete one short paper, one short electronic music composition, one short computer music program, and a significant final project (a musical composition, computer program, or electronic music device).
  3. Complete 2 examinations and a cumulative final examination.

Prerequisites

Junior standing - lower level General Education classes in Artistic Expression, Logical Systems, and Natural Systems should be complete. While some experience with music, computers, electronics, and acoustics is helpful, classes in these courses are not prerequisites for this course.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course is an examination of current legal issues and the role of the American legal system in the resolution of those issues.

Course Content

This course examines the current legal issues, which are now or may become of concern to the student. It presents the issues from different viewpoints, acquaints the student with the rival interest and concerns therein, explores the legal solutions, and encourages the student to evaluate all the alternatives indicated. The purpose is not to force a particular conclusion upon the student, but rather to allow the student to reach his or her own conclusion after developing an appreciation of and sensitivity to those competing interests and concerns. The controversial nature of some of the issues is recognized. A thoughtful, serious, and sensitive treatment of those issues will be offered.

Nature of Course

Students must have completed 45 hours to take this course. Completion of at least one law course is highly recommended. Course emphasis is on reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking. Appellate court cases and statutory legislation will be read and analyzed. Students will be required to prepare and submit writing assignments and perform satisfactorily on all exams and quizzes. Students may be required to participate in a long research project. Oral presentations utilizing student research will be required. Class discussions using the Socratic method to analyze the reading assignments will be the prevalent teaching method.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to attend class regularly and punctually; perform careful, regular, thorough, and timely preparation of all material assigned, including readings, written assignments, research, and oral presentations; participate actively in all class discussions; and make satisfactory scores on all periodic examinations. The research must be interdisciplinary. The student will be expected to formulate and defend his or her judgments and solutions in both oral and written form after analyzing and interpreting the readings and research results.

Prerequisites

45 hours.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of human sexuality, emphasizing biological, psychological, and sociological aspects. Sexuality issues dealing with critical thinking and valuing will be emphasized.

Course Content

This course is a study of human sexuality, emphasizing biological, psychological, and sociological aspects. A variety of topics (such as anatomy, physiology, conception, contraception, STD’s, sexual development, sexual behavior, sexual variations, and sexual dysfunction among others) will be covered from a multidisciplinary perspective. Those issues of sexuality dealing with critical thinking and valuing will be emphasized. This approach should provide the knowledge foundation that will allow students to make intelligent decisions regarding sexual functioning in an interdependent universe.

Nature of Course

The course will require some readings in addition to those found in the text. These readings will primarily be associated with specific projects. Students will have the opportunity to participate in several projects (e.g. values clarification exercise, etc.), classroom discussions, and involvement in assignments outside of the formal classroom (e.g. reactions to classroom exercises). The outside projects will have a strong emphasis on writing. The teaching format will be essentially lecture/discussion, with some emphasis on experiential involvement (values clarification exercises, problem solving, etc.).

Student Expectations

Student expectations include class involvement, participation in classroom discussions, successful completion of both in-class and out-of-class projects, and appropriate achievement on examinations (essentially objective and short essay format). These examinations will emphasize knowledge acquisition, development of critical thinking skills, ability to write, an awareness of cultural diversity, and an ability to integrate (at least to appreciate) various perspectives on sexuality.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education requirements in the following categories: Living Systems, Behavioral Systems, and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A process-oriented investigation of the interrelationships among the Earth Sciences and their interaction with living systems. One two-hour lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

Course Content

This course is a process-oriented investigation of the interrelationships among the earth sciences (atmospheric science, oceanography, geology, and astronomy) and their interaction with the living system.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to meet for one two-hour lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Students must have completed BS-218 Biological Science: A Process Approach prior to taking UI-318.

"Group activities" is a more appropriate term for the laboratory component of the course. Students, working in groups, experience an array of hands-on, process-based activities that deal not only with the earth sciences, but also with earth science/biological relationships and science/societal issues. The specific nature of these activities vary from in-lab investigations to class debates.

UI-318 puts considerable emphasis on independent student research and writing as exemplified in the "Student Expectations" section. Basically, the course is characterized by a process-based, teacher-response approach as opposed to the more traditional student-response approach.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class sessions and participate in class discussions.
  2. Actively participate in laboratory and field activities.
  3. Satisfactorily complete all assignments and make acceptable scores on examinations.
  4. Make cooperative contributions to project teams.
  5. Achieve integration of the interdisciplinary components of the course.
  6. Submit two lessons plans that address the interdisciplinary relationship between the living system and two of the four subfields of earth science: geology, oceanography, atmospheric science, and astronomy.

Prerequisites

BS-218 Biological Science: A Process Approach.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

The impact of technology on individuals and society through critical analysis of selected modern topics using communication and critical thinking skills.

Course Content

  1. Course Introduction and Overview - Structure, Discipline and Purpose.
  2. Science, Technology and Society - Definitions, Relationships and Impacts.
  3. Societies Changing Attitudes about Technology.
  4. Contemporary Issues and Adaptations.
    1. Science, Technology and Medicine.
    2. Environmental Issues.
    3. Energy Usage Issues.
    4. Science, Technology and the Space Age.
    5. The Information Age.
    6. Business and Industry in the 21st Century.
  5. Presentations.

Nature of Course

This course will utilize the students communications and critical analysis skills in the study of the impact of science and technology on society. Topics studied will examine the 20th century impact of science and technology upon society and investigate potential 21st century problems. Students will develop an interdisciplinary approach through the critical analysis of technical journals, class discussions and formal presentations which will allow them the opportunity to explore science, technology and society issues.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussion.
  2. Perform satisfactory on all quizzes, midterm and final examinations.
  3. Complete all assigned reading and journal reviews.
  4. Participate in a group presentation and paper.

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of courses in General Education categories of Economics, Social, Physical and Political Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Examination of the modern American presidency from the combined perspectives of history, political science, and speech communication.

Course Content

This course gives descriptive and analytic insight to one of the world's leading political institutions, the modern American presidency dating from the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt. This is a thoroughly political institution with a rich history in which modern practitioners rely heavily on mass communications as a means of getting the job done.

This course shows historical development of the presidency from Roosevelt to George W. Bush, illustrating its elevated use of the fundamental principles of public communication as a means of resolving the elementary political challenges all presidents face. Visual media showing presidents "in the act" are complements to the reading.

Nature of Course

This is a team-taught course based on reasoned discussion and argument with classroom participants. A class will begin with a thematic argument based on the pre-assigned reading. This is used as an analytic device to provoke debate and to establish premises for further discussion at later classes. Students are expected to do all reading conscientiously, in advance, and to be prepared to ask assistance on whatever is not understood. We will make clear what we seek when a paper is assigned or an exam date approaches.

Specific interest in politics, history, or speech and communication is useful, but not required nor necessary. Every student is deeply influenced by how presidents conduct their business; all majors are equally welcome to learn how this is so.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend and participate in class. This is not a straight lecture-and-copy class, so come prepared to question and discuss the material. In a typical semester students will take periodic objective quizzes to insure knowledge of basic factual content, write 3-4 analytical essays requiring critical evaluation, give one oral report as part of a group symposium, and complete a major research paper which goes significantly beyond what is treated in class. Students are also afforded the opportunity to earn credit by attending showings of filmed documentaries about the presidents studied. In addition, a significant field trip (e.g., a visit to a Presidential Library) or other activity (e.g., a conference or a visit by a noted authority on the presidency) is usually planned.

Prerequisites

Sophomore standing or higher.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Exploration of the interaction of political and economic forces as it affects international flows of goods, money, investments and technology.

Course Content

The purpose of this course is to assist the student in developing a global perspective regarding the interaction between the political environment and business and economic decision-making. This will be done by analyzing both historical and current events in light of various theories, including Marxism, Liberalism (pure market capitalism) and Realism. Some possible topics to be discussed include the political and economic causes and consequences of international trade, foreign aid, multinational corporations, the international debt problem, American hegemony, the Japanese "threat" to the American economy, the European Economic Community, and the International Monetary Fund. Students will be called upon to evaluate various information based on their own values as well as the values underlying the various theories. For example, after examining the economic and political relations between the United States and Japan, discussion might focus on the desirability of restricting these relations. After completing this class, the student will have a better understanding of current world events and be better able to evaluate current economic policies and foreign policy objectives of the United States and other countries.

Nature of Course

Students will be expected to do a great deal of reading from the textbook and other assigned sources. Some of the material is quite complex and students should expect to spend five to six hours per week reading course assignments. For those with a weak background in economics and political science, some extra background reading will be necessary. Students will be expected to come to class prepared to participate in class discussions and question/answer sessions; this participation will constitute a significant portion of the class grade.

Student Expectations

  1. Active, informed participation in class discussions.
  2. Satisfactory performance on a mid-term and final exam.
  3. Complete one term paper on a topic of the student's choice (with guidance from the instructor).
  4. Complete one or two article analyses.
  5. Prepare a class presentation on one of the article analyses.
  6. Timely completion of all assignments.

Prerequisites

Political Systems and Economic Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Selected experiments in physics and engineering with emphasis on measurement system design, equipment selection, acquisition and evaluation of data, and written and oral reporting. One lecture and two two-hour labs. Fall only.

Course Content

This course emphasizes experimental methodology employed by practicing physicists and engineers. The specific physics content of the experiment is of secondary importance compared to using good experimental techniques and good data acquisition and analysis techniques. Emphasis is placed on detailed comparison of experimental results with applicable theory. Students perform selected, non-prescribed, open-ended experiments in physics and engineering and then write two, journal-style reports and give two professional presentations on their work. Possible topics for experimental investigation include fiber optics, modern physics, lasers, optics, rotational dynamics, microwaves, thermal conductivity, holography, nuclear physics, and telescope resolution.

During the first week of the course, lectures cover topics such as statistical data analysis, error analysis and propagation, graphical analysis and least-squares fitting of data, computer resources for data analysis, resources for outside research, keeping a lab journal, and professional and ethical dimensions of physics and engineering.

Students then perform three experiments lasting two weeks each. A week of workshops follows on technical writing and technical presentations run by guest faculty from the English and Communication Departments. Students submit a formal written report in the format of a professional journal article and make a formal presentation to the Physics and Engineering Physics Department during a Common Hour. Students then perform three more experiments and again write a formal report and give a formal presentation during Common Hour.

Nature of Course

This course stresses working in lab groups with minimal direction from the instructor. Students are given questions that they are to answer experimentally. They become familiar with available equipment, design an experiment that will minimize sources of error to answer the questions, collect and analyze data, make detailed comparisons of their data with an appropriate theoretical model that they either developed through research or derivation, and then draw appropriate conclusions. The idea is to simulate, to the extent possible, the professional environment of a practicing physicist or engineer.

Student Expectations

  1. Be inquisitive and show initiative as to what and how to investigate the phenomenon under study.
  2. Prepare for efficient use of lab time by doing outside reading and research before coming to lab.
  3. Maintain two lab journals into which all lab-related work goes. While one journal is being graded, the other will be used.
  4. Be prepared to discuss your approach and respond to instructor inquiries as to the reasoning behind your approach.

Prerequisites

Logical Systems (MA-134 or higher); PH-121/021 or PH-231/031.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Structure and function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. Generation and utilization of energy.

Course Content

Foundations of Biochemistry describes the structure and biological function of amino acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. The function of the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation in energy production is discussed. Nucleic acid structure and function is introduced.

Nature of Course

The emphasis in this course is on reading - primarily the textbook. Writing is also emphasized: all exams are essay exams. There are some group and out-of-class projects. The teaching method is lecture/discussion.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all problem assignments, four one-hour exams, and a comprehensive final exam. Basis for student evaluation:

  • Problem sets - 15%
  • Hour exams - 70%
  • Final exam - 15%

Prerequisites

CH-342 or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Investigation of the views of women which have prevailed and still prevail in literary thought. For English and non-English majors.

Course Content

The past literary tradition has been essentially a male tradition. Few female writers were included in anthologies and survey courses, and many images of women were stereotypic rather than realistic. This course attempts to correct some of the bias of the past by focusing on feminist criticism, new images of women (both male and female authors), and stereotypes of female characters that have for too long gone unquestioned in literary study. Included in the course are English, American, European, and Third World authors, as well as representative minority writers from American culture. The five major literary genres, the short story, the play, the essay, the poem, and the novel, will all be represented.

Nature of Course

This course stresses reading, writing, and critical thinking. Class sessions will be a mix of lecture and discussion, with an emphasis on the latter. Each student will be asked to do an independent project under the supervision of the professor.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in discussions.
  2. Complete 3 examinations, two during the semester and a comprehensive final.
  3. Complete one individual project under the supervision of the professor.
  4. Complete impromptu quizzes and short papers over assigned reading.

Prerequisites

EN-40, any 200-level literature course.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A historical study of the social, political and philosophical roles of religion in America.

Course Content

This course is a historical study of the social, political and philosophical roles of religion in America.

Religious symbol systems exist as one means of integrating personal experience with collective human experience. Within a given civilization, religious systems are interdependent with other social systems in fulfilling this function. The study of religion involves examination of the religious symbol system and its integration with the civilization as a whole.

The specific study of religion in America must take cognizance of the reciprocity between the civilization and the religious symbol system. The shape of American religion was determined, in large part, by the nature of American civilization. The prevailing democratic spirit in America gave rise to a religious system characterized by voluntarism and pluralism. This course examines the substantive nature of religion in light of the formation of American civilization and the functional role of religion within American civilization.

The overall strategy of the course takes the form of an ongoing dialogue between the symbol system and the civilization. The course seeks an answer to the question, "How has American civilization affected and been affected by religion?"

Nature of Course

The course includes a wide variety of learning experiences. In addition to the traditional reading and writing, students make site visits to various churches, synagogues, temples, mosques, and meeting houses; view video materials; participate in mock debates; and work on case studies.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in discussions.
  2. Complete two examinations: a midterm and a final.
  3. Complete two research essays.
  4. Conduct an interview and write a report.
  5. Complete a critique of three articles.
  6. Participate in small-group book discussion.
  7. Complete an optional premium assignment.

Prerequisites

Students should have completed the lower division of the General Education curriculum or have the consent of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Analysis of the interrelational development of issues between twentieth century architecture and European/American civilization.

Course Content

The content in this course is designed to examine both the developments in western architecture and the attendant sociological milieu which contributed to these developments. Emphasis will be directed toward the interrelationships of technology, values of societies, and historical trends with the aesthetic concepts of architectural developments.

Architectural forms are a significant record and index of the sociological ferment of western twentieth century societies. In this course, there is an examination of architectural forms, the goals and logic of the architects, and the sociological issues which they attempted to address.

"Tools" of architectural, aesthetic analysis will be presented. This is to provide a basis upon which sound logical deductive and inductive conclusions can be made.

Nature of Course

Reading, writing, and examining of architectural examples (slides, reproductions, visits to actual buildings) will be equally stressed. Students will be expected to do all assigned reading, analysis, and synthesis, and to participate in field trips (mainly on campus and in the community--one field trip to a large metropolitan area (e.g., St. Louis). Class sessions will be a mixture of lecture and discussion, field trips, pop quizzes, reactions to videos, slides, and text illustrations.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Participate in discussions and classroom activities.
  3. Complete assigned papers.
  4. Construct a model in foam core board.
  5. Present a visual analysis of a piece of architecture in the midwest.
  6. Complete written examinations, including pop quizzes.

Basis for grading:

  1. Paper: Pre-modern Analysis (10%)
  2. Paper: Modern Analysis (10%)
  3. Paper: Comparative Analyses of 3 Architects and their works (10%)
  4. Visual Presentation (20%)
  5. Field Trip to City and Paper with color prints (10%)
  6. Mid-term test (10%)
  7. Model, white foam core board( 10%)
  8. Final Exam (20%)

Prerequisites

One course either in Artistic Expression or Development of a Major Civilization.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

North American Indians through settlement and expansion of the American frontier. Indian lifestyles today.

Course Content

The first part of the course examines what is known about the prehistoric origin of Native Americans, and gives a brief overview of the historic context of Indian-White relations. Part two examines the basic differences between food-getting and food-producing groups, and compares and contrasts the differences between tribal societies vs. industrialized groups. Part three focuses on specific Native American groups who historically practiced hunting/gathering forms of subsistence, and part four covers the agricultural societies. The final section looks at the nature of tribal level society as it relates to the indigenous populations of the world and the repeated culture clashes between these peoples and the industrialized societies of the West. The Native American situation is examined within this larger, global perspective.

Nature of Course

This course introduces students to Native American cultures with world views and ways of being which are fundamentally different from modern industrialized societies. It attempts to assist students in understanding the reasons for these differences, and allows the student to gain understanding various Native American cultures. The complex issues of Indian/White relations, both in the past and present, are examined within the larger global issues of "first contact," colonization, and colonialism throughout the modern world.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and actively participate in class discussions.
  2. Complete assigned readings.
  3. Satisfactorily complete all written assignments and make acceptable scores on examinations.
  4. Keep an open mind and enjoy the course.

Prerequisites

Social Systems or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of the relationship between humans and the built environment including social, psychological, economic and physical factors.

Course Content

  1. Physical perspectives on American housing forms
    1. Architectural styles
    2. Materials and components of production
    3. Production techniques
    4. Space analysis
    5. Other physical factors
    6. Relationship of physical factors to other aspects of housing
  2. Social/Psychological factors of the built environment
    1. Lifestyle, values, and needs
    2. Social class and social influences
    3. Psychological perspectives
    4. Special needs users
    5. Assessing housing behavior
    6. Relationship of social/psych factors to other aspects of housing
  3. Economic and legal considerations related to dwellings
    1. Tenure choices
    2. Affordability factors
    3. Financial options
    4. Legal aspects
    5. Relationship of economic/legal factors to other aspects of housing
  4. Public vs. private issues
    1. Housing assistance programs
    2. Urban planning
    3. Analysis of current issues in housing

Nature of Course

This course draws primarily from four General Education categories. In studying the fit between humans and the built environment, students will explore Behavioral Systems and Social Systems. Economic Systems and Political Systems will be addressed through units on the acquisition of housing and governmental influence on housing.

The main objective of this course is to explore all aspects of the housing industry from planning to production to distribution and use. Students develop an integrative approach to thinking through course assignments and class discussion which allow them the opportunity to analyze a variety of housing situations from many different perspectives, and then propose alternative solutions.

Student Expectations

  1. Participate in class discussion and activities.
  2. Complete all assigned readings and written work.
  3. Satisfactorily complete all exams and research paper.

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of courses in General Education categories of Behavioral, Social, Economic, and Political Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Examination of literary, political, and scientific achievements in 19th Century England.

Course Content

  1. Introduction
  2. Heroic Materialism
  3. The Survival of the Fittest
  4. Faith and Doubt
  5. Health and Medicine
  6. Getting at the Truth
  7. What was "Society"?
  8. The Empire
  9. The Aesthetic Movement

Nature of Course

The Victorian period is unique in that the literature must integrate a knowledge of science and political events. This was an age of great poets and novelists, and they wrote of public events. Reading Dickens requires a knowledge of economic conditions in England, reading Tennyson requires knowledge of the work of Lyell and Darwin, reading Arnold requires knowledge about British educational systems.

In fact, if a reader were to enjoy a month of reading only some Kipling, Browning, Clough, Rosetti, Meredith, and Wilde, that reader must also know something about British Colonial policy, Italian Renaissance art, psychology, theories on cosmic evolution, the Oxford movement in religion, pre-Raphaelite art, British penal systems, divorce laws, attitudes toward social deviants, and geology.

Perhaps there is no better example of the Integration of Knowledge in the Victorian mind than considering the works of Charles L. Dodgson, a mathematics professor at Oxford. His books include An Elementary Treatise on Determinants (1867), The Principles of Parliamentary Representation (1884), and, of course, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865).

Student Expectations

  1. Class attendance.
  2. Timely completion of all work including one classroom presentation and one research project.
  3. Satisfactory performance on examinations.

Prerequisites

Completion of Literary Expression course.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A critical analysis and examination of the normative concepts and ethical problems of modern political thought.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the origins and development of modern political thought and extensive analysis of several major political philosophical works by Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Marx. This particular course will analyze political theoretical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected interdisciplinary perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems).

Nature of Course

Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in political theory. Students will be encouraged to participate in active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to respond orally to such questions in the following session. This particular course will utilize a "Great Books" approach.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and to be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and to engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and respond orally to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a political philosophical issue or normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (10-15 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various political theories are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able critically to evaluate scholarly research in the discipline of political theory.

Prerequisites

Political Systems (PS-103 or PS-104), a course in Social Systems and a course in Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Studies the impact of culture on the business environment, including an on-site experience in the country/region of study.

Course Content

A brief overview of the culture of the country/region to be visited is presented, including history, geography, government, dress, housing, diet, lifestyle. An overview of the institutions being visited is studied. During a visit to the country/region, basic concepts are related to the observational experiences.

Nature of Course

This course consists of a literature review, theoretical concepts and an experiential component. The literature review will provide background to the student on the areas being studied as well as the institutions being visited. Theoretical concepts cover culture, intercultural awareness, cultural variation, and an overview of a particular culture to be visited.

The experiential component consists of on-site time spent in the selected culture making observational visits to institutions, cultural sites and participation in activities appropriate to the study of economic and cultural institutions.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend pre-departure classes and participate in classroom group activities.
  2. Prepare brief outlines relating to each of the institutions to be visited.
  3. Participate and interact satisfactorily in the cross-cultural field experience.
  4. Record in a personal journal observations, feelings, and insightful learning during the field experience.
  5. Complete essay final examination.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A study of the influence of cultural diversity upon the professions and major fields, which culminates in a supervised on-site expedition to the culture/country.

Course Content

Basic concepts are covered: culture, physical variation, cultural variation, intercultural awareness and communication. A brief overview of the country/culture to be visited is presented, including history, geography, government, dress, housing, diet, lifestyle. An overview of the designated subfield as it is practiced in the target culture is presented. During a two week visit to the culture, basic concepts are related to the observational experiences.

Nature of Course

This course consists of a theoretical and an experiential component. Theory covers basic concepts of culture, intercultural awareness, cultural variation, and an overview of a particular culture to be visited. The concepts are applied to the student's designated subfield (i.e. nursing, criminal justice, social work, physical education).

The experiential component consists of two weeks spent in the selected culture making observational visits to agencies, villages, cultural sites, and participation in activities appropriate to the subfield of study.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend classes and participate in classroom group activities.
  2. Participate and interact satisfactorily in the cross-cultural field experience.
  3. Record in a personal journal observations, feelings, and insightful learning during the field experience.
  4. Prepare a final paper addressing how and to what extent the student has met course objectives.

Prerequisites

Junior standing. One course in each of at least two of the following 100-200 systems: Behavior, Social or Living. Study of the language of the selected culture is recommended.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

The psychological, physiological, and social responses of people to the plants in their environment and the role they play in the improved physical and mental health of individuals as well as communities.

Course Content

This course is a study of the interactions between humans and the plant world. The course will point out the ways people interact with the plants in their environment and the role these plants play in improving the physical and mental health of individuals as well as the communities in which the individuals live. The main theme of the course will be to help one realize and understand that life without plants is impossible.

Nature of Course

The course will be divided into the following areas: (1) the role of plants in everyday life; (2) the use of plants to enhance community pride; the use of plants in the work place to reduce stress, increase productivity and cleanse the air; (4) the use of plants as therapy for the elderly, physically and mentally handicapped and those housed in prison; and to compare the plant/human relationship in developed and developing countries.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussions.
  2. Complete two one-hour exams and one (1) final exam.
  3. Complete out-of-classroom projects.
  4. Complete a term paper.
  5. Complete a group presentation.

Prerequisites

Social Systems and Artistic Expression or Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of Nonverbal Communication. Areas of study include body language, vocal cues, touching behavior, environmental factors, eye behavior, and physical appearance.

Course Content

  1. Orientation to Nonverbal Communication
  2. Approaches to the Study of Nonverbal Communication
  3. Environmental Factors in Human Communication
  4. Physical Appearance and Dress in Human Communication
  5. Territory, Personal Space, and Density in Human Communication
  6. Facial Expression and Eye Gazing Behavior in Human Communication
  7. Touching Behavior in Human Communication
  8. Vocal Behavior in Human Communication
  9. Nonverbal Communication in Various Settings
    1. Female-Male Interaction
    2. Social Communication
    3. Professional and Business Communication
    4. Intercultural Communication

Nature of Course

This course approaches the study of nonverbal communication from the disciplines of anthropology, communication, psychology, and sociology. The course represents a blend of social, scientific, and humanistic study. The historical roots of nonverbal research are traced and the numerous disciplinary approaches to the study of nonverbal are discussed. Overall, the importance of nonverbal communication in human society is explored. From the categories in the General Education program, this course draws from Artistic Expression, Oral Expression, Behavioral Systems and Social Systems.

Student Expectations

  1. Tests: There will be two exams during the course of the semester. The exams will cover assigned readings and class lectures. Each exam will be worth 20% of the final grade.
  2. Course papers and oral presentations: Each student will be expected to write three short papers (4-7 pages). At least one (more if time permits) of the papers must be presented orally to the class. Each paper will constitute approximately 10% of the final grade. The remaining 10% of the grade will be based on oral presentations and class participation.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education Perspectives of Artistic Expression, Oral Expression, Behavioral Systems, and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

How market, mixed, planned and developing economic systems are organized and function to obtain major economic, political and social goals.

Course Content

This course will emphasize the interrelationships between the political system of a country, its economic system and the historical development of both. Two hundred years ago, the political and the economic were united in the discipline of political economy. The works of Mill, Smith and Marx were writings on political economy. As the disciplines' knowledge increased, they split. While there are areas distinct to one and not the other, it has never been possible to look at a nation's economy without considering the political environment. In the words of George Stigler, "There can not be many things in man's political history more ancient than the endeavor of governments to direct economic affairs." (The Citizen and the State). Modern industrial countries tend to be judged both externally and internally in terms of economic performance. Therefore, no matter how insulated the political leaders and the political systems, they are vulnerable to economic conditions. Certainly this has been demonstrated by the changes in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Economic and political systems also exist in a historic context. For instance, different historical impacts such as the degree of dominance by Mongolian rulers may make it impossible for St. Petersburg and Moscow to follow the same post-Soviet route as Kiev. This course focuses on major industrialized and developing countries. It considers their economic objectives, measures their economic performances, and considers how these are influenced by their ideological, political, and historic perspectives.

Nature of Course

This course is both reading and writing intensive. There will be a textbook plus a number of assigned outside readings. Students are expected to read materials in advance and be prepared for class discussion. Class sessions combine lecture and discussion formats. All tests will be essay. Students are expected to demonstrate high quality writing skills on tests, the assigned paper and other written work. Students will need to spend at least six hours per week preparing assignments outside class.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussion.
  2. Satisfactorily complete three essay examinations.
  3. Satisfactorily complete a term paper on an assigned topic.
  4. Maintain a notebook of current events articles on topics assigned accompanied by written summaries of the articles.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower level Economic Systems and Political Systems courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A survey of social, economic and international forces that influence politics of Middle Eastern societies with particular emphasis on Egypt, Israel, Syria and Turkey.

Course Content

  1. Modernization and Political Development: A Theoretical Perspective
  2. The process of modernization and Change in the Middle East: An Historical Overview
  3. States, Beliefs and Ideologies: The Contradictions
  4. Competing Interests: Groups, Classes and Elites
  5. Institutional Infrastructure: Militaries, Bureaucracies and Legislatures
  6. The Arab-Israeli Conflict: Territorial Claims over the Holy Land
  7. Intra-Arab Conflicts: The Search for Authority and Unity
  8. The Politics of Oil and Energy: Paradox of Development

Nature of Course

The political and social scene of Middle Eastern societies is a strange mosaic where traditional rulers, revolutionary command councils, authoritarian military regimes and religious governing elites coexist side by side, where lavish wealth exists alongside poverty, where sociopolitical dissatisfaction sparks internal violence, and where interregional conflicts backed by religious and territorial claims threaten the stability of the region.

The answer to these questions is not simple and requires an interdisciplinary explanation. The politics of turbulent change and revolutionary upheaval in the Middle East is an outgrowth of dialectical clash between the forces of modernity and persisting strength of traditionalism. The primordial relationships and social structure are fastly losing their place, while the new value systems are yet to be formed. The subject matter will deal with dialectical relationship of socio-economic and political dynamics that shape the politics of the region. The material will be integrated in a manner that may lead the students to probe beyond simplistic generalizations and explanations.

Student Expectations

  1. Active, informed participation in class discussions.
  2. Satisfactory performance on examinations.
  3. Demonstration of critical thinking skills in all written assignments and oral presentations.
  4. Timely completion of all assignments.

Prerequisites

Political Science 103 or 104; and one course in Economic or Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Discussion of basic principles of public relations, publicity and propaganda used by business, political, and non-profit organizations to influence public opinion and communicate with their various publics.

Course Content

The course will focus on basic principles of public opinion management with emphasis on the management of public opinion.

Theories of communication effects will be discussed. Questions such as "Can we really be persuaded?" and "Is the media biased?" will be addressed. The attitude formation process and the attitude change process will be explored. Group influences on individual opinion and the concepts of public opinion, public relations, public affairs, and propaganda will be examined.

The concept of organizational "linkages" to various publics will be addressed. Other content areas in the opinion management process that will be covered are relations with media; employees; community; government; consumers; educational institutions; financial institutions; active publics; environmentalists; minorities; and special programs, such as promotion, fund raising and public communication campaigns.

Nature of Course

Students will be expected to read three texts and other selected literature in the field and discuss the material in class. Emphasis will be placed on class discussion and oral communication skills. Debate on issues will be encouraged. Selected case studies will be assigned to be read and discussed in class. A project emphasizing public opinion research will be required in addition to exams over the texts.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to participate actively in class discussions and satisfactorily complete class assignments. Exams over the text and assigned readings will be worth 60 percent of the student's grade. Written individual and team assignments will total 25 percent of the grade and class participation will account for 15 percent.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An examination of the ethical and social issues related to medicine, nursing, and biomedical research.

Course Content

The course examines a variety of ethical questions that arise in connection with contemporary medical practice. Ethical concepts and principles are introduced and applied to specific cases as they are described in popular, academic and professional literature.

The subject of medical ethics is inherently interdisciplinary, incorporating scientific knowledge and judgments about diagnosis, prognosis, treatment options, the quality of life, individual rights, autonomy, and social policy. A central theme of the course is that the scientific aspects of medical policies and decisions cannot be isolated from their social, religious, political and economic aspects.

Students will be introduced to some of the moral problems that arise in connection with the provision of health services. Emphasis is given to problems that arise in connection with new medical technology, the allocation of scarce medical resources, AIDS, the termination of life, informed consent, truthfulness, and confidentiality.

Nature of Course

A primary goal of the course is the development of the analytical skills necessary to evaluate medical policies and decisions from an ethical perspective. To this end emphasis will be placed on applying ethical concepts and principles to individual case studies. Classes are a combination of lecture and discussion, and students will be expected to do considerable reading outside of class. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, and participate in class discussion. During the semester students will be expected to prepare four separate case studies, and to demonstrate achievement on midterm and final exams. In addition, an 8-10 page interdisciplinary research paper is required.

Prerequisites

Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary study of the psychology of health and lifestyle management.

Course Content

The course will integrate knowledge and methods of investigation from the Behavioral and Social Systems areas. Students will compare and synthesize information from the disciplines of social sciences, health, and psychology in order to achieve a multidisciplinary perspective on health and lifestyle enhancement.

Nature of Course

The course is designed to enable students to make informed lifestyle choices as a result of attaining a broader understanding of the determinants of lifestyle, lifestyle consequences and completing a self-directed health behavior change project.

Student Expectations

  • Written exams (40%)
  • Health behavior change project (30%)
  • Assignments (30%)

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education requirements in the following categories: Behavioral Systems and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

The interdisciplinary study of the application of the critical thinking process to analyze economic, social, behavioral and political actions and interaction of consumers with the market and their use/consumption of those products and services acquired through the market exchange process.

Course Content

The main objective of the course will be to explore all aspects of the interactions of the consumer with the market. Students will develop an interdisciplinary approach to thinking through course assignments, discussions, informal debates and case study analysis which allow them the opportunity to explore issues from many different perspectives.

Nature of Course

Consumer science draws from the disciplines of economics, sociology, psychology, political science and others as consumer issues are addressed. Many literary works will be discussed also to provide a historical perspective on the consumer movement in the United States as well as its extension at the international level.

Student Expectations

  1. Participate in class discussion and activities.
  2. Complete all assigned reading, journal reviews and mini-assignments.
  3. Complete a term paper on a selected consumer issue.
  4. Satisfactory complete three tests and a final comprehensive exam.

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of courses in General Education categories of Economic, Political, Behavioral and Social Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A critical historical analysis and philosophical examination of the origins and development of early American political thought articulated in the classic works of significant American political theorists.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the origins and development of early American political thought. Extensive analysis of several major selections by theorists have made a major contribution to early American political thought. This particular course will analyze political theoretical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected interdisciplinary perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems).

Nature of Course

Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in political theory. Students will be encouraged to participate in an active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to respond orally to such questions in the following session. This particular course will use a "Great Books" approach.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and to be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and to engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and respond orally to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a political philosophical issue or normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (10-15 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various political theories are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able critically to evaluate scholarly research in the discipline of political theory.

Prerequisites

Political Systems (PS103 or PS104), a course in Social Systems and a course in Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A critical examination and study of ancient and medieval political thought articulated in the original classic works of significant political philosophers.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the historical origins and intellectual development of classical Greek, Roman and medieval political philosophy. This particular course will analyze political theoretical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected interdisciplinary perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems).

Nature of Course

Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in political theory. Students will be encouraged to participate in an active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to respond orally to such questions in the following session. This particular course will use a "Great Books" approach.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and to be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and to engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and respond orally to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a political philosophical issue or normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (10-15 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various political theories are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able critically to evaluate scholarly research in the discipline of political theory.

Prerequisites

Political Systems (PS-103 or PS-104), a course in Social Systems and a course in Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Exploration of personal, institutional, and societal strategies for dealing with solid and hazardous wastes.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to the history of solid and hazardous waste disposal in the United States and current waste practices. Biogeochemical cycles will be considered as a natural model for the disposal and reuse of wastes. The various steps in the closed-loop recycling process will be covered and options and difficulties will be considered. Recycling of paper, glass, plastic, metals, petroleum, demolition wastes, and hazardous wastes will be discussed. Purchasing policies as waste-reduction and recycling-promotion strategies will be considered. Source reduction as a waste management strategy and composting, incineration, and landfilling as alternative disposal strategies will be discussed.

Nature of Course

The course will have two primary emphases, lecture-discussion and student activism. The lecture-discussion portion of the course is intended to inform and arouse concern about the growing environmental problems associated with wastes. The procedures, problems, and benefits to solutions of these problems will be considered. This portion of the course will involve lecture-discussions, and assigned readings.

The student activism aspect of the course will stress the critical role of concerned individual citizens in addressing the waste crisis. Students will be asked to examine their own disposal habits, purchasing practices, and use of toxic chemicals. Each student will have experience communicating about recycling and wastes to a community group.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend class, complete assigned readings, and participate in class discussions. Satisfactory performance on midterm and final essay exams is expected. Students will also conduct and submit the results of a personal waste audit and personal hazardous chemical audit. Students will identify a community group and deliver a short oral presentation to the group on waste management.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and completion of the Living Systems and Physical Systems General Education courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A critical historical analysis and philosophical examination of contemporary political thought and the origins and development of major political ideologies of the late 19th century and 20th century.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the origins and development of contemporary political thought. Extensive analysis of several major political philosophical works by theorists associated with particular contemporary political ideologies, such as democracy, liberalism, conservatism, socialism, Marxism, anarchism, fascism, and Nazism. Critical analysis of the normative concepts that stimulated these theorists: The nation-state, nationalism, political authority, political obligation, civil rights, natural rights, natural law, consent, social contract, liberty, equality, property, justice, political participation, representation, constitutionalism, monarchy, privacy, and individualism. This particular course will analyze political theoretical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected interdisciplinary perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems). This course is designed to demonstrate to students the linkage between diverse political philosophical systems of thought and various forms of social and political behavior, public policies, and political institutions.

Nature of Course

This course consists of a conceptual analysis of the most significant perennial political ideas and political theories of contemporary political thought. Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in political theory. Students will be encouraged to participate in active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to orally respond to such questions in the following session.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and to be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and to engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and respond orally to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a political philosophical issue or normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (10-15 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various political theories are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able critically to evaluate scholarly research in the discipline of political theory.

Prerequisites

Political Systems (PS-103 or PS-104), a course in Social Systems and a course in Behavioral Systems.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An analysis of the application of economic principles to all aspects of law including contract law, torts, and criminal law.

Course Content

This course examines the relationship between economics and law. Four core areas of law will be examined: property, contracts, torts and crime. The basic approach will be first to develop appropriate economic theory for each area of law and then show through various examples and applications, how the economic theory can improve our understanding of the various areas of law. In general, the economic theory which is used does not advance beyond the principles or introductory level.

Nature of Course

The reading assignments are moderate in amount, though some of the economic theory may require a little review if the student has not taken an introductory economics course recently. The student will be required to read court cases and to apply the economic approach to an analysis of the cases through short, written reports. There will also be class periods devoted to analysis and discussion of court cases in groups. The student, through these assignments and practice, will come to see that economists and lawyers tend to think alike in many (though not all) cases.

A variety of teaching methods will be employed, including lecture, discussion, and group work. Students will need to feel comfortable learning in a variety of environments.

Student Expectations

Attend class on a regular basis and complete all assignments. Expect to spend 4-6 hours per week outside of class completing assignments, reading for class, preparing for tests, etc. It is important to note that students will be expected to complete reading assignments before attending class. The final basis for student evaluation will be as follows:

  • Three essay exams (60%)
  • Homework/Case Studies (25%)
  • Term Project (15%)

Prerequisites

EC-101 or EC-215 and completion of Political Systems component.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Investigation of the theories, concepts and methodologies employed in the scientific study of the mind from 1650 to the present.

Course Content

The course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the development of the science of the mind from the 17th century to the present day. Topics covered will be the a priori theorizing of René Descartes, the analysis of consciousness of William James, the investigation of the unconscious by Sigmund Freud, the experimental methods developed by B. F. Skinner, the cognitive-development theories of Jean Piaget and Lawrence Kohlberg, the information-processing models of contemporary cognitive science and artificial intelligence, and the evolutionary biology of E. O. Wilson. The course will conclude with an examination of the problem of consciousness and why it is thought to present a barrier to the scientific study of the mind.

The views of each major figure will be studied from different points of view, e.g., (a) whether they are compatible with a scientific psychology, (b) whether they are compatible with our conception of ourselves as moral agents, (c) whether they can accommodate the mentalistic framework which we use to understand ourselves, (d) whether they present scientifically acceptable hypotheses, (e) whether they can account for novelty and purpose in human behavior, (f) whether their theories of learning, development and reinforcement are compatible with human values.

Nature of Course

The course combines lecture and discussion of assigned texts. Students will be expected to do a good deal of reading and study outside of class, and should be prepared to discuss and apply the readings to hypothetical, experimental and clinical situations. Students should devote five to six hours per week to this course outside the classroom. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, participate in class discussion, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final exams. Students should also expect to write one or more discussion papers, and do independent research leading to the completion of a research paper.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education curriculum, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Investigation and analysis of some of the main concepts, issues and problems in moral psychology or character development.

Course Content

Moral psychology is the study of the nature, capacities and norms of evaluation appropriate for individuals considered as moral agents. It also seeks to learn how the evaluative study of character can be integrated with a scientific knowledge of human nature. Thus virtues and vices are understood, on the one hand, as qualities of character that lead to the performance of good or harmful actions. On the other hand, they are understood as dispositions whose development and expression is influenced by natural endowment, teaching, example and environmental conditions. Many basic human motives can be characterized as virtues or vices to the extent that they are effective in causing or determining behavior, e.g.benevolence, truthfulness and fairness on the one hand, selfishness, indifference and malevolence on the other. The course investigates the development, modification, expression and evaluation of such motives, together with their implications for the moral assessment of persons and their characters. Classical, traditional and contemporary views of human nature are considered for their ability to reflect ideals of character and to justify the judgment, assessment and shaping of character.

Nature of Course

The course combines lecture and discussion of assigned texts. Students are expected to do a good deal of reading and study outside of class, and should be prepared to discuss and apply the readings to historical, fictional and hypothetical situations. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, participate in class discussion, and demonstrate achievement on midterm and final exams. Students should also expect to write one or more discussion papers, and do independent research leading to the completion of a research paper.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education curriculum, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A study of the ethical questions that arise in modern mass media with emphasis on journalism, advertising and entertainment.

Course Content

This course examines the ethical issues that arise in modern mass media with specific emphasis on journalism, advertising and entertainment. The course begins with an introduction to ethical theory, a set of frameworks within which we make and justify ethical judgments. Those theories are then used to evaluate problems in the three content areas mentioned above. In addition to ethical theories, economic, social and political aspects of media issues are examined. Problems in media ethics are polycentric, that is, they have many dimensions. One of the goals of the course is to demonstrate how complex the issues are and how reasonable people often differ about the best resolution of them.

Nature of Course

Media Ethics is a course in applied ethical theory and, as such, must be interdisciplinary. This course integrates material from art theory (artistic expression), ethical theory (behavioral systems), economics (economic systems), law and politics (political systems), and business and social science (social systems). Discussions of the business pressures faced by editors relate moral theory, journalistic standards, economics and business. For example, how should the editor of a magazine devoted to women and women's issues respond to cigarette ads directed at women or to advertisers who demand "tie-in" articles in order to place ads in a magazine? The experience of Ms. Magazine is directly relevant here. Similarly, discussions of pornography and violence in the entertainment industry definitions and concepts of art, erotica, pornography and obscenity (artistic expression), ethical theories (behavioral systems), constitutional issues of free expression and other regulations (political systems) and social scientific research on the effect of pornography on society (social systems).

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly (be prepared to be called on in class).
  2. Participate in class discussions.
  3. Complete seven (7) written case summary reports.
  4. Prepare two (2) papers, one analytical, the other expository.
  5. Complete a mid-term and final examination (essay exam style).

Prerequisites

Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Government regulation of business in the United States with emphasis on differing economic and political perspectives concerning such regulation.

Course Content

The course will study various types of government regulation and consider efficiency based on the economist's model as opposed to the political reality of the actual regulatory legislation and process. In addition to developing economic models for regulation, the views of political scientists regarding the limitations of economic models will be considered. Subsequently, the course will look at various types of business regulation imposed by government. After studying the regulation itself as well as the political and historic context in which it developed, an attempt will be made to evaluate the regulatory results both from an economic viewpoint and a broader societal view. Most government intervention in the market fails to meet the economic criteria for efficiency; therefore, its justification and continuing popularity must be sought in the political realm. However, some types of regulation are obviously more efficient than others and at the same time meet the equity concerns of society. The course will attempt to assist the student in developing a framework for evaluating government intervention in terms of both economic efficiency and political realities.

Nature of Course

This course is both reading and writing intensive. There will be a textbook, a number of outside readings and ten or more homework assignments. Students are expected to read materials and prepare homework in advance. There may be occasional pop quizzes on assigned materials. A variety of teaching methods will be used but the class will focus on discussion of the homework and other assigned materials. All tests will be essay. Students are expected to demonstrate high quality writing skills on tests, the assigned paper, and other written work. Students will need to spend at least six hours weekly preparing assignments outside class.

Student Expectations

  1. Advance preparation of all assigned material.
  2. Active classroom participation.
  3. Satisfactory performance on three essay tests, ten or more homework assignments and pop quizzes.
  4. Satisfactory completion of a term paper on an assigned topic and oral presentation based on the paper.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower level Economic Systems and Political Systems courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of earthquakes: their causes, location, interaction with surface material and their effects on human society. The role of the public in seismic safety is examined in terms of both structural and nonstructural hazards in buildings as well as the need for earthquake preparedness.

Course Content

This course focuses on the study of earthquakes and the hazards they present to society. The initial portion of the course is the development of the background necessary to understand why earthquakes happen and where they are most likely to take place. All causes of earthquakes are discussed. The course also discusses seismic waves and how they interact with the surface and subsurface in an aim to demonstrate what the cause of damage to structures are during an earthquake as well as the utilization of the seismic wave to determine location and magnitude of the earthquake. The measurement of earthquake is discussed in both terms of seismic safety both structurally and non-structurally in an attempt to make the student more aware of their surroundings. The seismic risk for this region, the New Madrid Seismic Zone, is dealt with in detail as well as seismic zones throughout the United States.

Nature of Course

Depending on the instructor, the course is either totally lecture based with discussions and in-class projects or web assisted with lecture discussions and in-class projects. There will be reading assignments in prescribed text, handouts and reserved materials in Kent Library in preparation for lectures. There will be term projects and the nature of these projects will be up to the discretion of the instructor.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to attend all class meetings, complete all assignments, and to perform satisfactorily on all examinations. They are expected to participate in classroom oral presentations and discussions. Full participation in the term project (capstone project) is mandatory.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education Physical and Social Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Reading and evaluating the geologic record of biologic and geologic events, with chronicle of life and earth interaction through time.

Course Content

The course will consist of two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. Topics to be examined include: past environmental interpretation from fossils and sedimentary rocks; relative and absolute age dating of rocks; paleontology; techniques in fossil recognition and interpretation; evolution; modes of fossil preservation; stratigraphy; plate tectonics; and life and geologic events, and their interrelationships, from the beginning of life on earth to the modern day.

Nature of Course

The first seven weeks of lecture, and all labs, are devoted to teaching techniques for interpretation of past living and physical systems from data preserved in the rock record. The second eight weeks of lecture illustrate the interaction of physical and living systems throughout geologic time, by way of a chronicle of the past 3.5 billion years of life and geologic events. The intent of the course is to teach techniques for reading the geologic record of life and environments past, and to instill a knowledge of and appreciation for the geologic record of global change.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend and participate in all lecture and lab activities, including class discussion.
  2. Complete all labs and the final lab project (approximately 5 pages, interpretation of a past environment/ecosystem from a sedimentary rock outcrop).
  3. Perform acceptably on all exams.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Study of major European films and film makers in the context of French, German, and Spanish cultures.

Course Content

The course includes a study of the art and practice of film making in Europe, concentrating on French, German, and Spanish cinema. The particular emphasis of the course is the expression of national and linguistic cultures in the films and a comparison between European and American film making.

Critical analysis of film in general is combined with the identification and explanation of cultural particularities in representative French, German, and Spanish films. An historical perspective of the development of the film industry in Europe and its relationship to major artistic movements of the twentieth century are also presented. Readings, viewings, and research projects will allow students to investigate in greater detail one particular aspect of European film.

The course is designed for both foreign language majors and non-majors. It does not count toward the requirements of foreign language degrees, except as a UI 300-level course fulfilling the degree requirements in General Education; in fact, the emphasis is on an in-depth analysis of film, film history, and world-famous European directors, not on language as such. All textbook materials and in-class work are in English and all films viewed are subtitled in English. There is an extensive body of critical work available in Kent Library and through other sources in English.

Nature of Course

This course has a lecture/discussion format, for which students need to complete readings from the textbook and attend weekly viewings of the films under discussion. The course includes both the basic technical and critical tools of film analysis, the history of cinema in Europe, and the discussion of examples from major European directors.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to participate actively in all class activities, including class meetings, viewing of films, discussions, and class projects. In addition, each student will complete a research project on a specific aspect of European cinema in consultation with the instructor.

The course includes lectures, discussions, and tests on assigned material, reports on film viewings, and reports to the class of the progress of the major research project. The exams include objective question/answer (film terms, identification of directors/trends/ themes), short essay questions (e.g., characteristics of a movement such as German expressionism), and one longer essay (e.g., an analysis of the elements of a particular film).

Prerequisites

Completion of Artistic Expression, Oral Expression, Written Expression, Literary Expression, and Development of a Major Civilization in the General Education Core Curriculum or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

A historical investigation of American mass media and the philosophies and concepts underlying their development from colonial to present times.

Course Content

This course examines American mass media development and history as a product of the social, cultural, historical, and political environment unique to America. The course incorporates analysis and discussion of significant events, personalities, and issues affecting mass media's development as well as its role in reporting those events. The course outline is as follows:

  1. The Media in Early America
    1. British Roots of the Colonial Press
    2. Colonial, Revolutionary, and Party Presses
    3. The Philosophy of Press Freedom
    4. Penny Press and Early Magazines
  2. The Media in an Expanding Nation
    1. Sectional, Abolition, and Civil War Presses
    2. The Frontier Press and Manifest Destiny
    3. The Press and Industrial America
    4. New Journalism, Pulitzer, Hearst, and Ochs
    5. Reform Journalism: The Muckrakers
  3. The Media in a Modern World
    1. The Film Industry
    2. Radio
    3. Advertising
    4. Magazines
    5. Public Relations
    6. Television
    7. Newspapers
    8. Internet
    9. Satellites

Nature of Course

This course is taught primarily through the lecture/discussion methods. Emphasis throughout the course is placed on weaving the mass media's growth and changes into the fabric of the nation's development as a democracy and as a diverse and culturally-rich society. Whenever possible, the course utilizes primary sources (newspapers, magazines, audio and videotapes) from the periods and events under investigation to encourage students to critically evaluate the media in their proper context. Students engage in historical research using primary and secondary sources for some assignments.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Complete all of the assignments.
  3. Participate actively in group activities.
  4. Complete research assignments using primary and secondary research.
  5. Complete all regularly scheduled exams, including the final exam.

Prerequisites

Completion of 45 hours.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

The musical theatre genre is traced via close examination of its origins, evolution, and maturation as a living, contemporary art form.

Course Content

This is a survey course that traces the early European and early American influences that directly effect the development of this truly American art form known today as musical theatre. Areas studied in the survey of musical theatre will include origins, beginnings (1866), the formative years (1900-1927), developmental stages (1927-1943), the golden years (1943-1960), searching for new directions (1960 onwards), the mega-musicals of the 1970s and 1980s, and the new composers (1990-present). Attention will also be paid to the elements of the musical (the libretto, the lyrics, the musical score, orchestrations) and the artists working in musical theatre (producers/directors/ choreographers, actors/singers/dancers, and the design team).

Nature of Course

This course incorporates the developmental study of musical theatre (theatre, music, dance, and the visual arts) as an art from with its wide range of distinctive genres. A multitude of social and historical influences have had a profound impact on its development. The musical theatre form will not only be examined in the context of the society which produced it, but also how the genre evolved and developed to integrate all of the elements of the musical into a contemporary art form.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class on a regular basis.
  2. Read all text and supplemental readings in a timely manner.
  3. Participate in class discussions and presentations.
  4. View and write critiques on live and video performances of musical theatre.
  5. Satisfactorily complete a written semester research paper on an aspect of the course content.
  6. Demonstrate both knowledge and understanding of subject matter on two tests, a comprehensive final exam, and semester project/presentation.

Prerequisites

TH-100 Theatre Appreciation, or MU-182 Music: An Artistic Expression, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Introduction to fundamental scientific factors that affect human and ecosystem health, focusing on disease prevention/control and enhancing environmental quality.

Course Content

Environmental health requires the integration of knowledge from a variety of disciplines. For example, federal, state, and local environmental health programs must address issues associated with solid waste, hazardous waste, hazardous waste, sewage treatment and disposal, air pollution, water pollution, industrial/occupational health, and public health concerns. All of these issues require the consideration of biological, chemical, geological, sociopolitical, psychological, psychological, industrial, business, and educational factors.

Nature of Course

Each topic area will integrate knowledge from the scientific and social science disciplines through textbook readings, internet material gathering and class discussion and student group presentations.

In-class periods will be devoted to topic lectures and discussions by the instructor and human impacts resulting in environmental health impacts guided by the instructor.

Student Expectations

Attendance at all class meetings, participation in class discussions, completion of all papers and group presentations and satisfactory performance on examinations are expected of the students in the course.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and the Living Systems (any BI or BS course) and Physical Systems General Education courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

Introduction to the formulation and provisions of environmental regulations and policies with an emphasis on major federal legislative acts.

Course Content

Environmental law is a system of regulations, statutes, policy negotiation, case-specific interpretations and guidelines that are interrelated. Students are introduced to the activities associated with environmental public policy formation, interpretation, implementation and enforcement strategies that are grounded in scientific inquiry and occurs within cultural, economic, social, and political contexts. Specific topics include hazardous waste regulation, endangered species protection, clean air and clean water regulation and environmental assessment requirements.

Nature of Course

Each topic area will integrate knowledge from scientific and social study disciplines through textbook readings, federal and state regulation discussions, case-law interpretation and student group discussions. Students will present opposing case arguments during class periods.

In-class periods will be devoted to topic lectures by the instructor and case-law interpretations guided by the instructor.

Student Expectations

Attendance at all class meetings, participation in case-law discussions, completion of written reports and papers, and satisfactory performance on examinations is expected of the students in the course.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and the Living Systems (any BI or BS course) and Physical Systems General Education courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course will examine the Romantic Movement through an in-depth study of eight masterpieces of Romantic music in the context of their times.

Course Content

Romantic music reflected the peculiarly rich and turbulent era from which it sprang. Framed around the consideration of eight musical landmarks (ranging from the Trout Quintet by Franz Schubert, through works of Schumann, Wagner, Berlioz, Wagner and Bruckner, to the Elgar Cello Concerto), the course will encompass topics such as the role of women in the nineteenth century, the theories of Charles Darwin, the pictures of J.M.W. Turner, the Gothic Revival, the rise of Nationalism, the philosophy of Nietzsche, and the coming of the First World War.

The creative output of Romantic Composers has assumed a centrality in our current perception as to what music should be. In The Age of Romanticism the student will gain deeper comprehension of the cultural history and artistic expressions of the nineteenth century, as well as the epoch to follow.

Nature of Course

This course combines the disciplines of musicology and cultural history in investigating a specific repertoire of music. In addition, the course will address the subject from the perspective of the Development of a Major Civilization, with particular emphasis on the cultural atmosphere of the period under scrutiny. Students will undertake source readings in poetry, literature, philosophy, art criticism and so forth. Guest performers and presenters will visit the class to illumine the era and encourage students to make connections between the music under consideration and the world in which it appeared.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate actively in class discussions, analysis, and respond to the works under scrutiny.
  2. Successfully undertake dual oral/written presentations on various assigned topics for each set work.
  3. Read assigned literature and pursue active listening exercises surrounding the eight set works.
  4. Perform satisfactorily on all examinations.

Prerequisites

MH-251 and MH-252; or MU-181 or MU-182 or by permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course will examine the phenomenon of Modernism in music and culture through the study of thirteen masterpieces of music in the context of their time.

Course Content

Modernist music reflects the historical, technological, and social movements of its time. Modernism in music presents a study in extremes, with the works of many early modernist composers (e.g. Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky) holding a central place in the canon, while the works of later modernists (e.g. Luciano Berio, Charles Wuorinen) have not gained widespread acceptance.

In The Age of Modernism the student will gain a deeper comprehension of the schism that has divorced contemporary high culture from popular culture. The cultural, social and political history of the era will be illuminated by consideration of issues/works such as the First World War, Surrealism and Dada, the role of the CIA in the arts during the Cold War, Abstract Expressionism, the Beat Generation, Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood, the Reggio-Glass film Koyaanisqatsi and so forth.

Nature of Course

This course combines the disciplines of musicology and cultural history. Music criticism which integrates musical analysis with historical/biographical details will lead to an aesthetic appreciation for the repertoire under consideration. Concurrent with the musical approach (Artistic Expression), this course will study the Modernist movement through the perspective of the Development of a Major Civilization. Several teaching strategies will foster this interdisciplinary approach. Students will undertake source readings (poetry, drama, literature, art analysis, etc.). Presenters and guest performers specializing in aesthetic or historical features of the twentieth century will visit the class. In-class activities will make links between the music under consideration and the world in which it appeared.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate actively in class discussions, analysis, and respond to the works under scrutiny.
  2. Successfully undertake dual oral/written presentations on various assigned topics for each set work.
  3. Read assigned literature and pursue active listening exercises surrounding the eight set works.
  4. Perform satisfactorily on all examinations.

Prerequisites

MM-203 and MM-207; MU-181 or MU-182 or by permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course will investigate the development of music between 1600-1750 and its place in the culture of Western Europe.

Course Content

The Baroque Era is the beginning of what musicians call the Common Practice Period. The music of this period is analyzed, performed, and heard on a regular basis today and much of it is familiar and comfortable to students and audiences. Many students recognize ideas, values, and arts from this period that sound, look, and feel "modern." Social and political structures, economic systems, philosophical and theological arguments, and the artistic artifacts of this period exert considerable influence on students and their world today. Students taking this course will be introduced to these and other historical/cultural considerations, using music of the period as entry. By studying this music, the cultural developments of these eras, and their relationships, students will have the chance to understand the development of their world from the perspectives of Artistic Expression and Development of a Major Civilization.

Nature of Course

The semester will begin with a brief review of the musical foundations of the 16th Century. General topic areas include Monody, Stile Secondo and the Invention of the Opera; Baroque Instrumental Music; and High Baroque Vocal Music. The final portion of the course will be devoted to an in-depth investigation of a Baroque master. Class sessions will consist of lectures and listening sessions as well as discussions and student presentations based on readings, research, and outside-of-class listening. Students will do comparative score analysis as well as edit works from facsimiles of original editions and manuscripts. In addition to reading the textbooks, students will be required to read original sources (in translation) to better understand the cultural history of the period. Students will be evaluated on four tests, two group projects, and a final research paper and presentation.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate actively in class discussions, analysis, and listening projects.
  2. Complete all reading, listening, and score study assignments according to schedule on syllabus.
  3. Complete all writing assignments, including analysis papers and classroom presentations, in a timely manner.
  4. Perform satisfactorily on all examinations.
  5. Produce a culminating term paper and present an oral report on the results of the term paper. The paper and presentation will be completed according to guidelines issued for the project.

Prerequisites

MH-251 and MH-252 or MU-181 and MU-182 or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

An examination of Beethoven's life and music, and the cultural context in which it developed.

Course Content

This course is an interdisciplinary investigation into the life and music of Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the rich and tumultuous era in which he lived. Beethoven's life and his musical masterworks will be studied in detail, with selections from all genres (song, choral, orchestral, chamber music, piano) represented. Such masterworks as Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, Missa Solemnis, Moonlight Sonata, Fidelio, and the Ninth Symphony will be studied in detail, along with the biographical incidents in Beethoven's life that gave rise to these compositions. In addition, the cultural, social, and political history of the era will be fleshed out with discussions, readings, and interactive sessions devoted to the poetry (Goethe, Byron, Wordsworth), art (Goya, Turner), and political history (French Revolution, Napoleon, Waterloo) of the era. The course content will illuminate the development of Western European history at a crucial juncture: the era of revolution; and it will detail the changing intellectual climate as the Age of Enlightenment gives way to the Age of Romanticism. Central to these discussions will be the life and work of one great artist, Beethoven, whose creative genius helped shape the course of human history.

Nature of Course

This course will study Beethoven's music in a context-oriented approach. Analysis of his music will be undertaken under a broad spectrum of procedures, including formal analysis, textual analysis (for choral and song composition), autobiographical influences, performing practices, and expressive content. Analysis of the era in which he lived will be undertaken through lecture, discussions, interactive sessions, role playing, poetry readings, plays, and so forth. For instance, students will hear demonstrations of the changing sound of woodwind instruments in Beethoven's day, and will re-enact the Battle of Waterloo. Class discussions on such topics as Beethoven's revolutionary musical ideas, the emerging poetry of Romanticism, and the changing sound of the piano will take place.

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to attend class regularly and to participate actively in class discussions.
  2. Students are expected to perform satisfactorily on all examinations.
  3. Students are expected to complete all class assignments, including listening, reading, and writing assignments.
  4. Students are expected to complete a term paper and accompanying oral presentation that demonstrates original research on a selected aspect of the Age of Beethoven.

Prerequisites

MM-203 and MM-207; or MU-181 or MU-182 or by permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

300-Level Interdisciplinary Course

Catalog Description

This course will investigate the development of music between 900 and 1600 and its place in the culture of Western Europe.

Course Content

The events and artifacts of the 700 years considered in this course laid many of the foundations for what became the modern western world. The religions, values, social and political structures, economic systems, and arts that developed in Western Europe at this time continue to have direct impacts on the lives of today's students. Students will be introduced to these and other historical/cultural considerations, using music of the period as entry. By studying this music, the cultural developments of these eras, and their relationships, students will have the chance to understand the development of their world from the perspectives of Artistic Expression and Development of a Major Civilization.

Nature of Course

The semester will be roughly divided into four sections in which the class will consider the music and culture of the Early Middle Ages (Romanesque, 500-1100), Ars Antiqua & Ars Nova (1100-1400) Early Renaissance (1400-1520), and High Renaissance (1520-1600). Class sessions will consist of lectures and listening sessions as well as discussions and student presentation based on readings, research, and outside-of-class listening. Students will do comparative score analysis as well as transcriptions from facsimiles of original manuscripts. In addition to reading the textbooks, students will be required to read original sources (in translation) to better understand the cultural history of the period. Students will be evaluated on four tests, two group projects, and a final research paper and presentation.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class and participate actively in class discussions, analysis, and listening projects.
  2. Complete all reading, listening, and score study assignments according to schedule on syllabus.
  3. Complete all writing assignments, including analysis papers and classroom presentations, in a timely manner.
  4. Perform satisfactorily on all examinations.
  5. Produce a culminating term paper and present an oral report on the results of the term paper. The paper and presentation will be completed according to guidelines issued for the project.

Prerequisites

MH-251 and MH-252 or MU-181 and MU-182 or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of the ethical questions that arise in the context of doing business in modern society.

Course Content

This course involves a detailed study of the ethical problems that arise in business, along with methods and techniques for analyzing and evaluating proposed solutions. The course is divided into four sections. The first is an overview of ethical concepts and theories, and of the importance and role of ethics in business. Distinctions are drawn between the legal and ethical dimensions of business, and between consequentialist and non-consequentialist theories in ethics.

The second section examines the concept of responsibility, with emphasis on the view that discussions of responsibility make sense only within the context of well defined social roles. Different kinds of social roles are examined, as is the claim that the activity of business is itself a social role. Two different types of social responsibility often ascribed to business, beneficence and non-malevolence, are examined.

The third section examines problems of honesty and deception in business. The wrongness of deception itself is examined, along with specific problems involving deception in accounting, finance, management and marketing. Problems surrounding employee rights, privacy and whistleblowing are also examined.

The fourth section examines problems of economic and social justice. Theories of distributive justice and the role of business in achieving it are presented, along with broader questions of social justice and affirmative action.

Nature of Course

The course is discussion oriented rather than traditional lecture, and students will be expected to do a good deal of reading in preparation for class. Much of the reading material is analytical and argumentative, and students will be called on to analyze and discuss the reading material in class. The course requires a significant amount of writing, involving the preparation of case studies and a written research project. At least six hours of study time per week, apart from class time, should be devoted to this course. Essay questions are a component on all exams.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned texts, attend class regularly, participate in class discussion, and participate in a group debate on a question of ethics and business policy. Students are also expected to analyze at least five case studies involving ethical issues in business and complete a 10-15 page interdisciplinary research project. Students will demonstrate achievement on all examinations.

Prerequisites

Senior standing and completion of all lower division General Education courses, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Study of American regional landscapes including house types, barns, and other folk structures.

Course Content

The purpose of this course is to develop a greater awareness by students of the cultural landscapes of America. The course will examine the processes by which the architectural forms and settlement systems began to be developed in the colonial period. The discussion will be organized by regions such as New England and the South. Discussion of later evolution of American housing and structures will be based on such architectural styles as the Victorian Italianate or Queen Anne. The course will end with contemporary house types.

Nature of Course

There is an emphasis on reading in this course. Reading assignments will be based on articles in the library as well as in the textbook. A major project in the course is an analysis of a rural or urban area's cultural landscape. One feature of the project will be an oral presentation to the class, using illustrations. Lectures and discussion about relevant topics will be used.

Student Expectations

Examinations will be worth approximately 75-80 percent of the grade. The exams will be composed of objective questions such as multiple choice answers, and short essays or paragraph questions. Class projects will be used to determine the remaining percentage. The class project will require student access to a camera to be used for landscape interpretation. Photographs and slides will be used by the student for a presentation.

Prerequisites

Completion of courses in the General Education categories: Development of a Major Civilization, Social Systems, and Artistic Expression.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study and comparison of the music, instruments, style, and the music-making process of diverse world cultures.

Course Content

Music in World Cultures is an investigation of the art and artifacts of music and music-making as they have developed and been implemented in various cultures. Using the tools of the ethnomusicologist, students will consider the social, religious, political, and aesthetic influences on music in a number of cultures. While some basic content will be considered for each musical culture studied, this course is not a survey.

Music in World Cultures uses the interdisciplinary tools of ethnomusicologists who approach their subjects--music and music-making--through musicology, cultural anthropology, iconography, organology, linguistics, and history. Ethnomusicology is the study of musical behaviors and its students investigate a myriad of factors, including aesthetic philosophy, cultural technologies, and the historical evolution of musical styles.

Nature of Course

The semester will be broken roughly into three segments: Materials and Methodologies, Musical Cultures and Experiences, and Final Research Presentations. This is not a survey of world musics, but an ethnomusicology seminar using musics of specific cultures as study subjects. Each semester, two or three musical cultures outside of the mainstream Western European fine art tradition will be considered. The investigation of each culture will include reading and listening assignments as well as in-class listening, videos, and lectures. The class will function as a seminar, with specific topics covered over the course of several weeks.

In the first two sections of the semester, classes include lectures, listening analysis, and video presentations. Students will write short (up to 4 pages) response or reaction papers every two or three weeks. These papers will be presented for discussion in seminar sessions.

Two tests will be given. These tests are essays and will be based on readings, listenings, lectures, and discussions. They will allow the student to demonstrate his/her control of the subject matter as well as his/her critical thinking and writing skills.

As this is a capstone course, especially for music majors, the final research project and presentation are major components of the semester's work. The thrust of the semester is to equip the student with the tools to do musicological/cultural research and to hone his/her critical and writing skills. The final project should demonstrate the students' ability to apply these research critical and writing skills to a specific topic.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend all classes.
  2. Participate in classes by contributing to discussions with observations, questions, and responses that are germane to the subject at hand.
  3. Complete all reading and listening assignments prior to class.
  4. Complete all writing assignments, including response papers and classroom presentations, on time.
  5. Complete a major research project according to guidelines issued for the project.
  6. Make an oral presentation summarizing and describing the results of the Final Research/Field Work Project.
  7. Pass two exams.

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing (completion of 60 credits or more); completion of 100, 200, and 300 level General Education courses; ability to read music; or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

The study of national and international trends in manufacturing and production through the application of research and development techniques.

Course Content

Research in an international (global) manufacturing and production environment is a concept which cannot be ignored in the highly technological society of today. Activities in major manufacturing countries, and some in the Third World nations, demand investigation by students with the intent of comparative analysis with that of the United States. Manufacturing Research in a Global Society is a course that places students in actual manufacturing and production facilities where they, working in teams, have an opportunity to conduct research and develop solutions to "real world" problems. Students will also be taught the fundamentals of working with "high performance work teams," including the function, organization, and optimization with emphasis on listening and influencing skills.

Nature of Course

The course is communication skill development intensive. Students will conduct research activities in a variety of areas. Several industries have been contacted and have agreed to allow students to conduct research activities within their manufacturing plants. The students will then develop both a written and oral presentation of materials developed during the research process.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Complete written research report.
  3. Present research activities to the proper representatives.
  4. Prepare and present a brief class presentation on research activities.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education Core Curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

This course focuses on the full spectrum of the American health care system. This includes the current health care concerns of diverse populations and legal/ethical issues.

Course Content

This is a study of current concerns of the health and well-being of populations. Consumer concerns, bioethical issues, and healthcare access are addressed. Attention is given to the integration of previous knowledge into a broad understanding of health care in America.

Because the American health care system is very complex, various external and internal influences will be examined in depth. This includes ethical and legal issues, diverse perspectives of health care utilization, costs of health care, and the latest research and technology as related to health care.

This course is intended to address questions from a broad perspective with utilization of current events, historical studies, and primary references.

Nature of Course

This course is both reading and participative intensive. Students will be expected to do a great deal of diverse reading, and develop a reading list for other students in the course. Students will complete abstracts related to the readings on a weekly basis, and direct a seminar topic. Class sessions will primarily be directed discussions.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend and participate in seminar activities.
  2. Lead a seminar on one assigned topic in written and oral form.
  3. Prepare a reading reference for other students regarding their health care systems topic.
  4. Complete weekly abstracts of materials/readings researched on different health care systems topics.
  5. Satisfactorily complete all exams.
  6. Complete a formal paper on an assigned topic.

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and completion of 100, 200 and 300 level General Education courses, or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An integration of scientific and religious knowledge through reading and discussion related to epistemology, origins, and process.

Course Content

Do you put scientific knowledge and religious knowledge in two isolated "boxes" in your mind? What would happen if you took them out and carefully considered the ways they relate to each other? Can you accept the findings of modern science (the Big Bang, biological evolution, the laws of thermodynamics, quantum theory, etc.) and still be a faithful member of your religious tradition? Is there another religious tradition, a new set of beliefs, or another way of understanding your own tradition that might allow you to integrate everything that you think to be true?

If you're ready to give questions like these serious, carefully reasoned consideration, and to share your ideas and reasoning with others in an open but intellectually rigorous setting, then this course is for you. If you think that "there are some things we're just not meant to know," or "it's best not to think too much about your religious beliefs," or you just don't want to talk about your own beliefs (or disbelief), then another UI course may suit you better. The class covers these three main topics:

Epistemology: How do you know what you know?
Origins: How did we get here? Why is there something rather than nothing?
Process: How do events occur? Is there genuine chance in the world, or are events predetermined? Do we have free will, or are we controlled by a deity or our brain chemistry?

Nature of Course

The course is organized as a series of learning cycles. For each of the major topics, each student first writes a brief paper (2 pages) outlining his or her present ideas. Before each class session, each student reads a chapter from the text or an assigned paper by another author and writes a short summary of its main points. In class we discuss the day's reading in groups. At the end of each unit, students write longer papers (~5 pages) explaining their ideas on the topic again, showing how their ideas are supported by other authors, defending them against counter-arguments, and describing how and why their ideas have changed or remained the same during the unit.

Student Expectations

Students must read assigned material, locate additional pertinent sources, write summaries of assigned readings, participate actively in class discussions, and write three short and three longer papers. Students with any sort of religious belief, or none, can be successful in this course; however, each student must consider his or her own views critically, and consider the views of others supportively.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education curriculum or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Examination of major developments contributing to our understanding of the solar system and their impact on the future of mankind.

Course Content

This course documents and explains how our knowledge of the solar system has progressed rapidly from myth, mystery and misconceptions to dramatic scientific understanding. It focuses on the advancements made in planetary exploration, from the advent of the telescope to recent space probes and human missions. It also addresses the impact of these advancements upon society and considers its future as the potential for mankind to leave its home planet and pioneer the solar system becomes more real.

The course is divided into three major themes centered on telescopic views and interpretations, the use of planetary probes and humans in space, and future activities planned for solar system exploration and their significance to human development. Subject matter from the natural environment is integrated with that from literary, artistic, and human institution perspectives.

Nature of Course

To inform students about the major developments in solar system exploration, use is made of a variety of historical and current materials ranging from early scientific and popular publications, charts, and drawings to recent maps, photographs, and the vivid images obtained from spacecraft missions to the planets. These materials serve to exemplify the role that physio-psychological factors play in the transformation of an observed image viewed in a telescope to its representation as an illustration. The difficulties that arise due to such factors led to much mis-interpretation of early scientific data, and this persisted for several centuries until the advent of more recent observing equipment and techniques. Oral discussion activities and a written course paper will enable students to examine and analyze these and other particular aspects of planetary exploration or its ramifications upon historical, contemporary, and future society.

Student Expectations

Students should attend all class meetings and must participate in classroom activities, such as a debate or panel discussion. Completion of a course paper on a chosen topic related to planetary exploration, along with oral presentation of the findings, is also required and is worth 25% of the total grade. Finally, satisfactory performance on three examinations featuring objective and essay questions is expected and these comprise the remaining percentage of the course requirements.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education core curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An examination of the origin and development of modern European thought and culture.

Course Content

This course investigates the main currents of European scientific, philosophic, religious, political, social, and economic thought from the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century to the present. In addition, it examines modern European thought through its art, music, and literature. Each of these ways of seeing the world and the human condition is studied in its historical context.

The European Mind concentrates on the connections between historical forces and modern ideas and intellectual systems. It examines the efforts of intellectuals who lived in the modern era of European history to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate ideas regarding the nature of humanity, society, and the world. This course presents exemplars of critical thinking in science, religion, philosophy, political and social theory, as well as art, music, and literature. It also provides explanations about how the ideas developed by modern Europeans have influenced life and society in the United States.

Nature of Course

The primary instructional methods employed in this course are lecture, large and small group discussions. Lectures provide the historical background of the life and ideas of European intellectuals. In some cases, they also serve as a means of philosophical analysis of the ideas under study. Large and small group discussions deal with readings about the intellectuals and excerpts from their works. They require students to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate the ideas of those intellectuals. Students will regularly write brief commentaries on the reading assignments in class and share them with their classmates in discussion groups. In addition, they will have opportunities to compare ideas on a particular issue from different periods, including the present. In order to engage in the study of the history of ideas, one must think critically. Thus, the very nature of this course entails critical thinking, analyzing, and reasoning.

The major project for this course is a biographical essay. Students will participate in a guided bibliographical research activity in which they will learn to use the tools of gathering biographical information. Following their decision to study a particular intellectual, they will examine biographies about that person, studies of the period in which the intellectual lived, studies of the intellectual’s work, and samples of that work. Students will then write a biographical essay in which they attempt to connect the life and times of the intellectual to his or her ideas. This task will require students to use the historical method of research and interpretation and the method of interpretation relevant to the field of the intellectual’s work. Following completion of the biographical essay, students will share the results of their research with their classmates in a brief oral presentation.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to complete reading assignments for each class session and participate in discussions of those readings. They also will be expected to perform satisfactorily on two essay examinations, to research and write a biographical essay, and to make an oral presentation on the results of their research.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and completion of Artistic or Literary Expression, Physical or Living Systems, Social or Political Systems, and Development of a Major Civilization.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Critical study of the reasoning used in the discovery and justification of scientific theories.

Course Content

  1. Introduction
  2. The Nature of Theories
    1. Models, Hypotheses and Laws
    2. Explanation and Prediction
    3. Realism and Empiricism
  3. Discovering Theories
    1. Discovery and Justification
    2. Heuristics
  4. Justifying Theories
    1. Inductivism
    2. Deductivism
    3. Naturalism
  5. Case Studies
    1. Celestial Mechanics - Ancient and Modern
    2. Newton's Synthesis
    3. Mendelian Genetics
    4. Mendeleer and the Periodic Table

Nature of Course

The aim of this course is to introduce students to a range of fundamental issues in the philosophy of science. The central question around which these issues revolve is 'How does science work?’ In exploring the various answers which have been given to this question, extensive reference will be made to episodes drawn from the history of science (detailed knowledge of the fields concerned will not, however, be presupposed). Class sessions will be oriented towards informed discussion of a variety of original readings, many of which will be set as homework assignments. The research project will be based on material not all of which is directly covered in the course and will therefore involve a certain amount of independent research in Kent Library. At least six hours of study time per week, apart from actual class time, should be devoted to this course.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and participate in class discussions.
  2. Complete all homework and reading assignments.
  3. Complete one long research project.
  4. Complete one mid-term essay exam and one final essay exam.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education Core Curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

The study of the exchange of symbols or messages that to a significant extent have been shaped by or have consequences for the functioning of political systems, i.e., an examination of the relationship between communication processes and political processes.

Course Content

Over two thousand years ago, Aristotle underscored the fact that politics and communication are inseparable parts of human nature when he observed (in his Politics) that human beings are political animals and pointed out (in his Rhetoric) that human beings alone possess the capacity for speech. In democratic cultures like our own, the relationship between these two essential aspects of human nature has never been more symbiotic. Especially with the advent and growth of the mass media, politics and communication have become intertwined. Thus, today to fully comprehend how power is wielded in democratic societies requires more than an understanding of political institutions and their operation, but also a thorough understanding of the process of using symbols to influence others, i.e., rhetoric. In this course, by focusing on political campaigns both past and current, students will have the opportunity to actively explore the connection between politics and communication through units of study that deal with political communication technology, political advertising, political debates, and political speechmaking.

Nature of Course

This course emphasizes active learning strategies wherein students learn through experience and discussion rather than through straight lecture. For example, students will analyze political debates, political speeches, and formulate and evaluate campaign strategies. A high percentage of course material will involve videotape and other non-print sources.

Student Expectations

In addition to regular classroom attendance, participation in classroom discussion, keeping up with reading, and taking a mid-term and final examination, each student will be expected to complete the following assignments: write and possibly produce a political commercial, participate in a mock presidential debate, ghostwrite a political campaign speech, keep a journal chronicling a national, state, or local campaign, prepare a 12-15 page term paper on a campaign from history. Students may be asked to participate in other activities and field trips as opportunities arise.

Prerequisites

Oral Expression (SC-105) and Political Systems (PS-103 or PS-104), or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Principles, techniques and theories used to influence the behavior of others through oral communication, with special emphasis on the analytical tools necessary to evaluate persuasive appeals more responsibly.

Course Content

  1. Perspectives on the Study of Persuasion
  2. Advocacy and Language: Symbol Manipulation
  3. Social Bases of Persuasion: Identification and Audience Analysis
  4. Persuasion and Reasoning
  5. The Psychology of Persuasion: Attitudes, Beliefs and Values
  6. Power, Credibility and Authority
  7. Persuasion Contexts and Arenas
    1. Advertising
    2. Politics
    3. Public and Mass Communication
    4. Interpersonal Persuasion
  8. The Construction and Presentation of Persuasive Messages
  9. Evaluating Persuasive Messages/Campaigns

Nature of Course

Investigative goals of the course include: the nature and importance of persuasion in human decision making, the theories and concepts of persuasion which relate to successful influence, the methods of the rhetorical process of selection, analysis, presentation and evaluation of persuasive appeals.

Performance goals of the course include: the criticism and analysis of rhetorical examples which reflect successful versus unsuccessful persuasion, the discovery, analysis and presentation of potential influence appeals through assigned campaigns, and the development and enhancement of skills necessary to make reasoned, reflective and critical responses to persuasive appeals.

Student Expectations

  1. Complete two formal oral presentations:
    1. Midterm presentation: A rhetorical analysis of a promotional ad.
    2. Presentation of the final project (described in item 2 below).
  2. Complete a highly structured, extensive rhetorical analysis dealing with a persuasive campaign or movement.
  3. Complete a series of quizzes, short papers, and one comprehensive final exam.

Prerequisites

Junior standing and completion of the General Education core curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

This course provides theoretical investigation of and the opportunity for community service through volunteerism. Includes a 1 hour integrated lab.

Course Content

The course emphasizes learning through service by incorporating experiential learning through volunteerism. Emphasis is placed on the contributions of volunteerism in meeting essential needs of people and improving the quality of life in communities. The course content explores theories that promote the idea that human beings are interconnected, interrelated, mutually interdependent, and become involved in reciprocal interactions and exchanges in the process of living. Emphasis is placed on essential preparations for successful volunteering and a 32 hour volunteer service requirement is used as a springboard to deepen understanding of human need and the power of one individual or groups of individuals in meeting those needs.

Nature of Course

This course is primarily taught as a seminar. It is interdisciplinary in nature using theories from several disciplines to promote understanding of the human experience. The course is designed to encourage students to make a difference in their communities by identifying needs and providing service. The required volunteerism is intended to provide the stimulus for reflection and deeper understanding of the needs of people in communities as well as the difference that volunteering can make in the life of the volunteer and those being served.

Student Expectations

This course conforms to the rigor of UI 400 and 500 level courses. There is extensive reading and discussion. Much of the discussion and sharing connected to this course occurs in the online environment. Students are expected to use the online bulletin board to respond and interact reflectively to assigned readings. Students are expected to be introspect and reflect on the course content and their volunteer experience. In addition to a cumulative exam, there is a scholarly research paper that explores the relationship of their chosen volunteer setting to the larger picture of human needs, programming to meet needs, and community well being. Students are required to make a scholarly presentation of their research and writing to their classmates. The reflective journal and written assignments as well as written and verbal responses to videos allow students to explore their values, ethics, and attitudes.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Comprehensive study of the ethical, social, scientific, and cultural problems associated with the use and abuse of natural resources.

Course Content

Everyone recognizes the human need to live in the environment, and to use it to survive. The problem, however, is understanding the right way to use natural resources. Should resources be overconsumed, or do we have a moral obligation to conserve and to recycle? Do we envision the world as an inert collection of material resources here for human dominion? Is it a sacred, indeed a living, place which should be used only with careful reverence? Are there other alternatives? Do we as human beings have a responsibility to the rest of nature, if not for its own sake, then for future generations? Environmental Ethics is one of the hottest new topics in philosophy today. It casts its nets widely, analyzing the ethical, socio-economic, political, scientific, and cultural problems associated with the use and abuse of natural resources. The course is divided into the following units:

  • Unit I: Primer in Ethical Theory (An introduction to traditional approaches to human ethics)
  • Unit II: Primer in Environmental Ethics (an introduction to the differences between environmental and human ethics)
  • Unit III: The Science of Ecology and the Ethics of Interconnection (An analysis of the extent of interconnection between the science of the environment and an ethics of the environment)
  • Unit IV: Readings in Environmental Ethics (An in depth study of the leading theories in environmental ethics)
  • Unit V: New Frontiers in Environmental Ethics (An analysis of eco-feminism, Gaia theory, "green" politics and other new concepts in environmental ethics)

Nature of Course

The solutions of environmental problems are, by their very nature, interdisciplinary. As a result, this course will reflect that very definition. Students will be expected to both read and actively engage the course material. By this, the student will be involved in many in class activities, from hands-on demonstrations to discussions and debates. One fully understands the ethical dimension of environmental problems when their complexities are encountered first hand. A simple "readings and lecture' format discourages such encounters. Thus, the course will be active, and as "hands-on" as possible. Through a combination of free-flowing interdisciplinary discussion, and hands-on demonstration and computer simulations, we will attempt to understand the rich diversity of the environment and the ethical role of humans within it.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend class regularly.
  2. To be prepared to participate in class discussions based on sets of discussion questions.
  3. To be prepared to hand in critical journals on a semi-weekly basis.
  4. To read the assigned texts and articles, and be prepared to participate in class discussions and demonstrations regarding them.
  5. To complete preliminary independent research culminating in a proposal for a final position paper.
  6. To present a summary of the term paper for class round table discussion.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education courses in Logical Systems, and either Physical or Living Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of the interaction of historical, economic, and political influences upon the biological and psychosocial nature of individuals aging into the twenty-first century.

Course Content

This course will provide students with a historical and cultural background for understanding why aging is conceptualized as it is and how one's social, psychological, and biological aging is profoundly affected by political and economic forces that are tied to the history and culture of a society. The focus will be to show how these systems are interrelated by understanding how past and present political, social, and economic forces interact with the nature of public programs and policies, the functioning of various institutions (e.g., medicine, government) and are ultimately reflected in the attitudes and behaviors of aging individuals and their families. One of the major emphases of this course will be the development of students' ability to critically examine the multidimensional forces affecting the everyday life of all aging individuals.

Nature of Course

This course is designed to be a seminar in which students, both individually and in small groups, discuss their analyses of the interconnections among areas that determine the nature of aging. A significant amount of reading of research materials relating to biological, psychological, social, economic, and public policy issues will be required. Students will be required to participate in and lead discussion of the materials and relate their understanding of the application of these materials. A major research project as well as small writing assignments and quizzes will be required.

Student Expectations

  • Attendance and participation in all course-related activities.
  • Effective involvement in group research activity.
  • Satisfactory performance on quizzes over readings.
  • Seminar leadership on an assigned topic.

Prerequisites

Completion of General Education requirements in the following categories: Natural Systems and Human Institutions.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary study of 9 plays by Shakespeare as they relate to contemporary issues and events.

Course Content

Shakespeare's characters and his themes are timeless. Hamlet, and Brutus, and King Lear, and Macbeth still exist and may be found anywhere from Wall Street to Main Street. Shakespeare's plays provoke timely questions: What rights and responsibilities does one generation have in its relationships to other generations? What is the effect of racial prejudice? Does power corrupt? Does civilization save us or destroy us? How can modern man find harmony in an imperfect world? This class is designed to encourage students to find their own answers to these and many other questions.

The course requires close reading of the assigned plays and some use of critical material. It also requires that students be moderately well informed on current events that are newsworthy.

Nature of Course

This is a course based on discussion and performance, with students participating in both. Guest lecturers from other disciplines will present some plays from their own perspectives. For example, one lecture on Hamlet might be presented by a psychologist. Or an instructor from music might present Verdi's opera Otello as the class studies Shakespeare's Othello. Films or excerpts from films will be shown or made available to students.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Research paper or creative project.
  3. Close reading of material.
  4. One examination for each play, both objective and essay, with the lowest grade to be dropped.
  5. Active participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

Completion of any course in the Literary Expression category.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An interdisciplinary study of five history plays and four comedies by Shakespeare. The plays will often be studied in the light of contemporary issues and events.

Course Content

The five history plays will cover the period of the War of the Roses, from the abdication of Richard II, through the Lancaster and York kings, ending with the arrival of the Tudors. For the remainder of the semester, the class will cover The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest, A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Much Ado About Nothing.

The course requires close reading of the plays and some use of critical material. It also requires that students be moderately well informed on current events that are newsworthy. Historical background will be provided as part of the course.

Nature of Course

This is a course based on discussion and performance, with students participating in both. Students are encouraged to relate the plays to their own lives and to contemporary events. Films or excerpts from films will be shown often.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Research paper or creative project.
  3. Close reading of material.
  4. One examination of each play, both objective and essay, with the lowest grade to be dropped.
  5. Active participation in class discussions.

Prerequisites

Completion of any course in the Literary Expression category.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A critical investigation into the aesthetic difference, function, significance, and value of the movement disciplines of dance and sport.

Course Content

This course includes: a developing understanding of the definition, history, inter-relationship and distinction of the terms aesthetics, dance, and sport; an ability to locate, organize, and examine information on those three topics; written and oral critical thinking skills in examining sociological perspectives of aesthetics of movement, artistry vs. athleticism, the role of creativity, and movement as a cathartic experience; and developing the ability to construct a defensible personal philosophy towards the aesthetics of movement.

Nature of Course

The Aesthetics of Movement integrates subject matter in the category of Artistic Expression (Perspectives on Individual Expression) with the category of Social Systems (Perspectives on Human Institutions). Through dance and other movement forms such as athletics, consideration of the aesthetic component of expression can enhance students' perceptions, analyses, interpretation, and judgments of their own and society's perspectives. Readings in philosophy, aesthetics, poetry, literature, and criticism inform the student's understanding of dance and sport. As manifestations of oral traditions, dance and sport require kinesthetic and intellectual knowledge of a specialized kind, involving respective vocabularies, rules of conduct, and feats of coordination which are handed down by choreographers and coaches alike through an elaborate verbal/physical communication system. Facility in both dance and sport has often been characterized as the apprehension of unique oral and physicalized "languages," or forms of communication (Cohen, 1984; Sheets-Johnstone, 1983). Experiential learning involving different dance styles and sports from a variety of social systems around the world will provide students with the comparative skills necessary to appreciate, understand, and intelligently discuss the rich diversity and complexity of cultural attitudes and identity inherent to these movement forms. It will be demonstrated that dance and sport both serve as manifestations of humankind's need and desire for meaningful expression.

Student Expectations

Attend class regularly with an active, engaged, and informed attitude. Demonstrate a sophisticated, critical thinking capacity while satisfactorily completing all reading, writing, discussion, and active learning movement assignments. Demonstrate an interdisciplinary analytical research ability in the generation, investigation, and elaboration of questions, issues, and projects.

Prerequisites

45 credit hours.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

The literary and sociological study of the role, both positive and negative, sport plays in American society.

Course Content

Readings and discussions in this interdisciplinary class focus on the various ways that sport interrelates with specific subject matter areas such as literature, sociology, philosophy, history, economics, and psychology. Topics will be examined in terms of functionalist and conflict theories of sport. Functionalists argue that sports create and sustain feelings of good will and solidarity among members of a community or nation. Conflict theorists believe that sports, like other social orders, are based on exploitation and coercion, particularly with regard to gender, race, ethnicity, and social class. These contrasting views will be traced in representative essays, stories, novels, poems, plays, and movies. Sample topics include; Roles of Athletes, Coaches, and Spectators; Sport as a Social Institution; Sport, Race, and Gender; the Business of Sport; Sport and Politics; Sport as Metaphor and Myth; and Sport and Aesthetics.

Nature of Course

This course, which involves a considerable amount of reading, writing, and discussion, challenges students to examine sports seriously and critically from the perspectives of opposing viewpoints--some positive, some negative. Interdisciplinary in nature, the course will require students to integrate the study of sports with other interests or disciplines.

Student Expectations

  1. Class participation, including completion of all homework and reading assignments (20% of total grade).
  2. Completion of an interdisciplinary research project (30%).
  3. Three additional short written/oral presentations, one of which will be a book review (30%).
  4. Midterm and Final exams (20%).

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of agricultural issues and public policy using knowledge and methods from agriculture and social ethics.

Course Content

The first third of this course will examine the principles and applications of four ethical systems. The remainder of the course will use these to approach case studies concerning the environmental issues of agriculture, food safety issues, foreign food aid and trade, the treatment of animals, the preservation of family farms, biotechnology, agricultural sustainability, and other issues. Throughout the semester a single issue of concern in Southeast Missouri agricultural systems will be studied through readings, guest lectures, field trips, discussions, and by other means.

Nature of Course

The objectives of this course are (1) to help students learn how to use principles and methods from social ethics and information from agriculture to understand agricultural issues and the various values-based perspectives people have about these issues; (2) to help students learn how to gather information and learn about complex agricultural issues; and to help students make informed value decisions about critical agricultural issues and public policy.

Class time will be used primarily for discussion, guest lectures, field trips, and other activities; lectures will be rare.

Student Expectations

Preparation for and participation in class discussions (10% of grade), seven quizzes (25%), one take-home examination (25%), and one paper (40%).

Prerequisites

Senior standing.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

An emphasis on mathematical ideas as a growing, changing human endeavor, which influences the history of societies including today’s technological culture.

Course Content

Mathematics transcends time, geography, society, culture and religion. The contributions to mathematics come from all eras, cultures, and religions. Mathematics is a universal language, and mathematical thinking is a part of human activity. The universality of mathematics is emphasized. The knowledge of mathematics today is the sum total of creative efforts of many mathematicians from many centuries. The course offers a road map for a student's journey through their thought processes. It is a journey over the mathematical highways of examples, conjecture, generalizations, and proofs. It offers glimpses into the lives of great men and women mathematicians. The course treats the nature of modern mathematics and the impact of technology on the learning and teaching of mathematics as well as the mathematical contributions of ancient mathematics.

The course examines development of mathematical ideas over the past 5000 years. It covers mathematical thought in all countries and all cultures and explores forces that hindered or helped this development such as geographic location, commercial growth, social isolation, political persecution, and religious bias.

Nature of Course

The essential student requirement is the desire to learn how mathematics came about, how mathematicians lived and worked, and how the different areas of mathematics development. Students will do writing assignments as well as class presentations. A research paper is a required part of the course so library work will be needed. Discussions and problem solving are important activities of the course.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly and actively participate in class discussions.
  2. Solve assigned problems and turn in solutions and other class assignments.
  3. Write a course paper.
  4. Make at least two oral presentations.
  5. Take at least two tests and the final exam.

Prerequisites

Development of a Major Civilization General Education course and MA-139 or MA-140.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A critical analysis and examination of some of the fundamental political philosophical questions, normative concepts and ethical problems of the Holocaust.

Course Content

This course consists of a critical examination of the intellectual, cultural, philosophical, political and historical origins and development of the Holocaust. Extensive analysis of several major philosophical political, intellectual historical, literary and autobiographical works that have made a contribution in providing deep insights and raising significant questions on the Holocaust. In particular, analysis of key normative concepts and issues that stimulated such writers: anti-Semitism, intentionalism v. functionalism (i.e., the origins of the Holocaust), the "uniqueness" of the Holocaust, the political ideology of Nazism, Jewish resistance, the articulation of experiences of the Holocaust, the problems of memory and representation, theological and religious consequences of the Holocaust, the ethical issue of choices, Nazi propaganda, the plight of victims, and the roles and motivations of bystanders and perpetrators. This particular course will analyze political philosophical concepts, normative principles and issues from the interconnected perspectives of politics (political systems), culture, religion, and social philosophy (social systems), and ethical theory (behavioral systems).

Nature of Course

This course consists of a conceptual analysis of the most significant political philosophical, moral, and intellectual historical ideas, issues and themes of the Holocaust. Students will be encouraged to develop competency working in the area of ethical justification by applying moral principles and logical arguments to normative problems and issues in conjunction with the political theories of the Holocaust. Students will be encouraged and required to participate in an active Socratic dialogue with the instructor and with other students. At the end of each session, a series of analytical questions will be posed to students. Students will be required to respond orally to such questions in the following session. Consistent oral participation is not only a particular requirement of each individual student, but a necessity for the intellectual progress and understanding of the Holocaust for the entire class.

Student Expectations

  1. To attend consistently all scheduled classes and be prepared in all assigned work.
  2. To participate and engage actively in class discussion and dialogue with other students and the instructor.
  3. To maintain diligently a systematic set of class notes and to finish all required reading assignments on time.
  4. To take three major examinations (including a final exam), that will be composites of objective questions (multiple choice and/or identification) and analytical essay questions in which they clearly demonstrate comprehension of the critical thinking skills and substantive material of the course.
  5. To prepare and orally respond to a series of analytical questions posed at the end of each prior session.
  6. To prepare an oral presentation on a Holocaust political philosophical issue of normative concept.
  7. To prepare an interdisciplinary (15-20 page) written research paper.
  8. To comprehend the diverse conceptual frames of reference by which various theories and interpretations of the Holocaust are designed and articulated.
  9. To be able to evaluate critically scholarly research in the study of the Holocaust.

Prerequisites

Junior or senior standing and completion of General Education Core Curriculum, or consent of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Individualized study of and experience with the effective and appropriate design, execution, and reporting of chemical investigations.

Course Content

"Professional Experience in Chemistry" explores four important ways that chemists communicate with one another as professionals: written reports, oral presentations, personal conversations at professional meetings, and published chemical literature. These modes of communication are studied and practiced as the student investigates a problem of the student's choice in basic or applied chemistry. Working with a faculty mentor, the student will develop and defend a proposal for a project intended to make progress toward the problem's solution. To increase the likelihood that the student's professional interactions will indeed result in one or more problems solved, the course seeks to bring the student more fully into the scientists' culture through application of the scientific method and sound principles of experimental design, including consideration of safety and environmental issues, as well as moral and ethical concerns. Application of these concepts to an investigative experience will enhance the proposal's credibility and improve the possibility of the investigation's success.

Nature of Course

The course emphasizes problem solving and communications skills applied to an investigative project. Each student will develop and practice skills and knowledge needed to access the chemical literature. The nature of scientific truth will be discussed, and case studies will be used to explore environmental and safety issues, as well as moral and ethical questions in science. The application of presentation software, such as Microsoft PowerPoint, to scientific presentations will be explored through computer lab exercises.

Student Expectations

Each student will

  1. Attend class meetings.
  2. Complete reading assignments to facilitate student participation in class discussion.
  3. Participate in class discussion and collaborative activities.
  4. Select a Mentor for the Experiential Learning (EL) Project from the Chemistry Department faculty.
  5. Prepare an Abstract for an EL Project.
  6. Prepare a written Proposal for an EL Project.
  7. Orally defend the Proposal before the Chemistry Department's EL Committee.
  8. Attend a professional meeting jointly selected by the student and the Mentor.

Prerequisites

CH-180, CH-181, or CH-185.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Critically examine the social, cultural, familial, and political factors that influence human sexuality and expression.

Course Content

Students in this course will examine sexuality through an interdisciplinary approach. Sexuality will be critically discussed, analyzed, and researched from a variety of disciplines consisting of: biology, anatomy, human development, cultural studies, history, politics, criminal justice, and philosophy. Students will think about sexuality analytically and develop a sociological understanding of the complexities of sexuality in interpersonal relationships and society.

Nature of Course

This course draws from the disciplines of human development, sociology, biology, physiology, anatomy, history, political science, family studies, criminal justice, and cultural studies. The main objective of this course is to integrate knowledge and gain a broader understanding of sexuality not only in our personal lives but also in our children’s lives and as a society as a whole. These objectives will be obtained by critically examining human sexuality from various perspectives. This course fits under the perspectives of Natural Systems and Human Institutions. Course topics will relate to the categories of Behavioral Systems, Living Systems, Development of Major Civilization Systems, Political Systems, and Social Systems.

Student Expectations

The students will show progress in meeting course objectives by:

  1. Students will read all assigned materials and complete all assignments in a timely, professional manner.
  2. Students will attend class regularly and participate in class discussions and group activities.
  3. Students will write several 1 – 2 page personal reflection papers on topics discussed in class. Students will orally present in class specific points from their reflection paper.
  4. Students will choose four interdisciplinary topics to research, analyze, and interpret. They will present their findings in written form and share with the class orally.
  5. Students will interview someone regarding their thoughts pertaining to a topic from class and summarize their findings in written form.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of the American Civil Rights Movement from the 1950's to the present.

Course Content

This course examines African Americans' continuing struggle for civil rights in America. Concentrating on the period extending from the desegregation battles of the 1950's and 60's to the battles over affirmative action of the present day, this course will look at the issues and events which define the movement, examine the role of both leaders and followers in pushing the movement forward, and explore the role of music and the arts as a tool to resist oppression. Students will assess the achievements gained in the movement to date, and ascertain the status of the Civil Rights Movement at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The course will also place the African American struggle for civil rights in its larger context by examining the 19th and early 20th century antecedents of the struggle, as well as some of the subsequent movements for obtaining equality for minority groups in America, including women, Native Americans, Latinos, Gays and Lesbians, and the Disabled.

Nature of Course

The format of the course will be lecture and discussion. Students will read extensively, discuss the implications of their readings in class, take several essay exams, and complete a research paper.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to attend class regularly, participate in class discussions, read all assigned materials, complete all written and oral assignments in a timely manner including a research project, and demonstrate mastery of course content on examinations.

Prerequisites

Completion of courses in General Education categories: Development of a Major Civilization, Social Systems, and Artistic Expression.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Group-based solution of open-ended problems based on cases or scenarios from the "real world," requiring interaction among students with diverse training. Prerequisites: Completion of the General Education Core Curriculum and senior standing in one of the disciplines specified for the particular section. Additional prerequisites may be required for particular sections.

Course Content

The course is intended to provide students with an experience simulating that of professionals in their major disciplines, whether in industry, business, or academic research. Each section proposal will be evaluated both for its requirement of rigorous application of scientific or mathematical skills and knowledge as well as the extent to which the project is interdisciplinary. Individual sections will have purposes and objectives specific to the content areas addressed and the nature of the particular problem. Every section, however, will address these common objectives:

  1. Oral communication:
    1. Students will use effective oral communication skills to communicate with group members.
    2. Students will make presentations appropriate to a lay audience regarding their progress and proposed solutions to problems.
    3. Students will orally present design alternatives or questions to a lay audience and solicit necessary input.
  2. Written communication:
    1. Students will compose written progress reports that are suitable to a lay audience.
    2. Students will use written memos to record progress, solicit information, and suggest approaches within their groups.
  3. Natural systems or Logical Systems, depending on section:
    1. Students will apply background knowledge from their major disciplines to identify issues pertinent to the problem.
    2. Students will apply content and methods from their major disciplines to propose possible solutions to the problem.
    3. Students will apply content and methods from their major disciplines to develop a solution for the problem.
    4. Students will devise experimental, modeling, application, or verification approaches and test the efficacy of proposed solutions.

Nature of Course

Students are presented with a real-world problem that requires a solution combining skills appropriate to one or more scientific or technical disciplines and possibly others such as business, the humanities, etc. Each section offered will have a specific theme and integrate specific disciplines, which will vary from section to section. Students then work in groups to solve the problem by applying the required skills.

Student Expectations

Each student will:

  1. Attend class meetings and group meetings.
  2. Complete assigned tasks within the group in a timely manner.
  3. Participate effectively in the preparation of written reports and presentations.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education Core Curriculum and senior standing in one of the disciplines specified for the particular section. Additional prerequisites may be required for particular sections.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A critical examination of variables impacting the development of literacy including perspectives from neuroscience, communication, education, and social science.

Course Content

This course focuses on the development of literacy from various professional perspectives. The neuroscience perspective of literacy is examined through study of how the “brain learns to read.” The communication perspective of literacy is examined through study of the role of language and hearing in the reading process. The education perspective of literacy is gleaned from a critical review of theoretical approaches to regular and remedial reading instruction. Lastly, the social science perspective is derived from analysis of environmental, cultural, political, and behavioral variables that influence literacy development.

Nature of Course

This course incorporates a variety of instructional techniques to guide the student to a critical and reflective analysis of challenges pertaining to literacy development. An extensive review of works by David Sousa and Mel Levine, scholars in the areas of brain and learning, allows students to integrate perspectives on literacy development from neuroscience and education. Students locate, review, and summarize current periodical literature to discover the role of language and hearing in literacy development. To explore the educational perspective, students develop a presentation on an assigned reading instructional technique. Of particular importance to this presentation is a critical review of the technique in regard to the guiding principles of evidenced-based practice. The social science perspective is examined through student participation in forum discussions focusing on governmental roles in literacy promotion, behavioral issues in literacy development such as motivation, literacy environments in the home and community, and the cultural value of literacy.

This course includes subject matter encompassing a number of perspectives including living systems through the study of the neuroscience, linguistic, and auditory aspects of literacy as well as behavioral social systems through discussion of motivation, cultural value, and environment as they pertain to literacy development. In addition, students utilize skills of written and oral expression as they develop their knowledge and understanding of challenges to literacy development. At the conclusion of the course, students comprise a summative written paper that challenges them to integrate information from different perspectives in a description of multidisciplinary solutions to eliminate barriers to literacy development. This course is of particular interest to individuals involved in education, speech-language pathology, as well as social and cultural aspects of literacy.

Student Expectations

  1. Students are expected to attend/review course lectures and assigned readings.
  2. Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions.
  3. Students are expected to complete 3 tests and a final written essay examination.
  4. Students are expected to deliver a 10-15 minute class presentation.
  5. Students are expected to complete a 4-6 page research paper.

Prerequisites

Completion of 300-level General Education requirement.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Explores contemporary research on male issues in the field of men’s studies, including male development across the lifespan.

Course Content

The main objective of the course is to explore contemporary research on men and male development across the life-span. The course draws from disciplines of human development, sociology, psychology and biology. In studying the topic of male development, students explore theoretical perspectives as well as empirical works from different disciplines. A cross-cultural and historical perspective is considered by students reviewing men’s’ studies in the United States as well as other cultures.

Nature of Course

The interdisciplinary nature of this course is accomplished by examining empirical data and theoretical frameworks from various disciplines such as human development, psychology, sociology, and biology. As the extensive course outline indicates, the content allows students to study and integrate knowledge gained from professional works and theoretical viewpoints identified in these scientific fields. For example, the integration of information from these disciplines is emphasized by exploring biologically-based theoretical perspectives as well as humanistic and existential theories on male and gender development (Behavioral Systems). Also, cultural variations and ethnic issues about men and masculinity will be examined from psychosocial and political perspectives (Social Systems). A multidisciplinary perspective will be applied to discuss topics such as males’ physical and mental health, sexuality, career issues, and roles in family.

The interdisciplinary nature of the course is also emphasized through various assignments and projects. These projects will allow students to investigate theoretical constructs and contemporary research about male development. For example, to address the subtheme of “Integration of Knowledge: Living in an Interdependent Universe”, students are required to interpret data and exercise individual expressions by participating in class discussions, informal debates/oral presentation, group collaborative projects, writing research papers, and analysis of case study reports. Therefore, the courses content and assignments combine the perspectives from Social & Behavioral Systems, Human Institution, and Natural Systems.

In addition, the course content and assignments create a context to promote students’ skills in some of the major General Education Objectives including: “Locate & Gather Information”, “Critical Thinking”, “Understand & Relate to Human Experiences”, and “Various Cultures & Their Relationships”.

Student Expectations

  1. Class attendance and participation in class activities.
  2. Satisfactorily complete all assigned reading from professional journals and conduct oral presentations.
  3. Satisfactorily complete research paper.
  4. Successfully complete all exams.

Prerequisites

Satisfactory completion of any General Education courses in Behavioral or Social Systems categories.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Seminar and hands-on workshop exploring the influence of printing on the formation of world cultures up to the digital age.

Course Content

This interdisciplinary class will use the approaches of history, studio art, and art history to explore the influence that Gutenberg and his invention of printing with movable type had on the intellectual, political, and social formation of world cultures. We will also question whether a similar revolution is taking place in the digital age. In a seminar format, we will focus on major developments in the technologies of representation – image-making, writing, printing – against their relevant social and historical backgrounds. In addition to seminars, weekly practical workshops will explore the physical technologies of the written and printed word through hands-on paper- and parchment-making, calligraphy and illumination, woodcutting, engraving, etching, lithography, letterpress printing, bookbinding, and digital publishing. The course will culminate in a final book-making project that uses one or more of these technologies to explore the boundaries between the oral and written, manuscript and print, self and “other”.

Nature of Course

This course integrates the General Education Perspectives of Human Institutions (with respect to the Development of a Major Civilization) and the Perspective of Individual Expression (with respect to Written Expression and Artistic Expression) by leading students to employ the approaches of history, studio art, and art history to explore the influence that the technology of writing – and its changes – had on the formation of various world cultures. In order to focus on the Perspective of Human Institutions in the area of the Development of a Major Civilization, we will study the development of European technologies of writing, from the Greek scroll to the monastic scriptorium to the printing press, and the social and political contexts that influenced those changes. We will also seek out the wider influences of world cultures on these technologies throughout time, such as the relation of Egyptian and Phoenician scripts, Chinese paper, and Korean printing to our modern print culture. We will also question whether a similar revolution is taking place in the current digital age. To address the Perspective of Individual Expression, with respect to the areas of Written and Artistic expression, students will examine how developments in technologies of writing have themselves shaped human written and artistic expressions around the globe – for example, in some cultures, such as the monastic culture of the European middle ages, the technology of calligraphic writing, which itself can be considered an important form of artistic expression, was as significant (and spiritual) as the written text it communicated. By integrating these two perspectives of Human Institutions and Individual Expression students will be encouraged to form an awareness of the interdependency between technological change, artistic expression, and world history. The integration of these Perspectives is also designed to foster an understanding of the development of current world cultures, and written culture specifically, as not being teleologically determined by European civilization only, but as an expression of the myriad historical, cultural and societal exchanges that mirror our complex world today.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Participation in all class discussions and activities during class hours.
  3. Reading all materials assigned.
  4. Timely completion of all written and oral assignments, including a research paper and oral presentation of that paper, and a final artistic project and the oral presentation of that project.
  5. Demonstration of mastery of course content in two short critical analysis papers.
  6. Demonstration of computer skills in word processing, location of information, and the use of visual presentation software.
  7. Students must comply with Southeast Missouri State University’s policies regarding academic honesty, as outlined in the student handbook. Penalties for academic dishonesty range from receiving no credit for the assignment and/or failing the course to expulsion from the University.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

This course explores the history of African Americans from 1619-1865.

Course Content

Beginning with an examination of the Transatlantic slave trade and the perils of the Middle Passage, this course will examine the creation of African-American culture in North America, the establishment of race-based slavery throughout the North American colonies, the realities of slave life in the antebellum South, the role of music in African-American slave culture, African-American resistance to slavery and oppression, and the experience of free blacks in both the North and South.

Nature of Course

Organized as a discussion seminar, this course examines the African-American community and its development, both slave and free, from the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in Virginia in 1619 through the general emancipation that occurred with passage of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865. This course will explore how African Americans interacted with and changed the major political and social systems of this country as well as the ways in which artistic and literary expressions have been instrumental in helping African Americans endure and overcome oppression and discrimination. By taking this interdisciplinary approach to the African-American experience during the period of institutionalized slavery in America, students will develop an enhanced understanding not only of the reality of the treatment African Americans received in this country and their ongoing struggle for freedom and equality, in itself a major development in our American civilization and an important change in our social system, but of the important role of music in sustaining community and fostering change in American society. By integrating knowledge from these various perspectives, students will develop an understanding of the interdependency of peoples and cultures in society.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Participation in class discussion.
  3. Reading all materials assigned.
  4. Timely completion of all written and oral assignments, including a research paper.
  5. Demonstration of mastery of course content in three critical analysis papers.
  6. Demonstration of computer skills in word processing and location of information.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Experience with the natural environment resulting in students actively seeking ways to combine environmental stewardship with professional and personal lives.

Course Content

Students in this course will develop a conceptual definition and personal philosophy of nature literacy through the investigation of research and reports that focus on initiatives in environmental stewardship, natural history, and local ecology. Additionally, they will be given the opportunity to demonstrate skill in critical and evaluative reasoning during and following guided nature instruction experiences. Course content blends the principles of culturally responsible values and practice, moral and ethical decision making, and the sustainability of the natural world and global economy. This constellation of experiences will enable the student to appreciate both the importance of environmental protection and the joy of nature.

Nature of Course

This course draws from the disciplines of human development, sociology, psychology, the arts, and biology. In studying the subject of nature literacy, students will explore topics that represent the following General Education Perspectives and Categories: Perspectives – Individual Expression, Natural Systems, and Human Institutions; Categories – Artistic Expression, Behavioral Systems, Living Systems, and Social Systems. Empirical works and theoretical perspectives from multiple disciplines will be discussed to provide a foundation and cultivate an appreciation for environmental stewardship in the natural community. The main objectives of the course are to integrate knowledge with an appreciation for the natural environment and to cultivate critical reasoning and evaluation skills. Through scientific processes, observation, experiential learning, course assignments, discussions, and informal debates, students will synthesize the course materials to develop a personal philosophy about their ability to learn from and respond to direct experiences with nature.

Student Expectations

  1. Read assigned materials, utilize available library resources, and participate in individual and group activities.
  2. Complete all assignments in a timely, professional manner. Students will be required to spend considerable time in an outdoor environment.
  3. Complete a research paper on the impact of chosen profession on the natural environment and efforts towards environmental stewardship in the student’s field.
  4. Successfully complete all examinations and regularly attend classes.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Exploration of the history of capital punishment in United States law, constitutional issues, and policy arguments for and against the practice. (3)

Course Content

The death penalty is one of the most controversial issues in contemporary American criminal justice. This course will explore the history, constitutional rules and implementation of the death penalty in the United States. The purposes of the death penalty will also be reviewed along with an analysis of the effectiveness of these purposes. Methods of carrying out death sentences will be reviewed, from a historical as well as modern perspective. The course will review current issues relating to the death penalty including racial implications, cost, and possible wrongful convictions and executions. The course will also include a thorough debate of whether or not the death penalty is an appropriate and effective method of punishment for the most serious of offenses.

Nature of Course

Students will be able to describe the trends in the history and practice of the use of capital punishment in Anglo-American society. Students will be able to identify the Constitutional protections and analyze their relationship with current issues and trends related to the death penalty. Students will be able to analyze the sociological theories relevant to the death penalty, including deterrence and retribution.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Take all tests and quizzes.
  3. Participate in class discussions.
  4. Complete all assigned papers.

Prerequisites

Junior or Senior Standing

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

This course will investigate the development of Modernism in western culture by means of the arts produced at the time.

Course Content

Issues in Modern Art is designed as a chronological and thematic course aimed to expose students to the unique political, social, economic, and artistic innovations of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In this course, students will use works of art as a base from which to study these topics. Emphasis will be placed on the context in which works of art were produced in order to understand the aesthetic choices that artists made. Influences from non-western cultures will also be explored as a manifestation of an increasingly interconnected world that was one of the outcomes of the Modern period. Other such shifts in how people lived and worked will be addressed, such as the movement away from long established traditions to new modes of expression as an individual endeavor.

Students will use the insight gained from these types of discussions to explain the formal qualities of works of art and the reasons for their creation.

Nature of Course

The Modern period was a time of experimentation and reflection. The Industrial Revolution initiated advancements in society, but also inflicted hardships and caused suspicion. Different groups chose to react to the effects of the Modern world in different ways. Some of the Realists, for example, chose to document their experiences closely, thereby exposing issues of isolation and class distinction.

As the twentieth century approached, the inventions of the previous century became commonplace and allowed for the transmission of artistic styles, political movements, and social reforms between Western Europe, Asia, Africa, and the United States. As a result, artistic movements, such as Impressionism, which began in Paris, soon made its way to the United States. However, the exportation of artistic styles did not mean that each culture interpreted the movements in the same way. The hybridization of styles, like Impressionism, within a new cultural context was dependent on that groups own political, social, and artistic ideas. Therefore, each style appropriated elements of the culture in which it was practiced creating a new way of expression. In Europe, for example, the Impressionists became the painters of Modern life and recorded the emerging bourgeois class. Their landscapes and portraits documented their world and extolled the idea that their era was worthy of commemoration and equal to past cultures, like the Greeks and Romans.

As World War I loomed, European artists reacted to the political and social decay that they encountered. German Expressionists, like Franz Marc, documented the horrors of war through his paintings of animals. His own feelings toward the war evolved in his works as they became darker and more violent. He, like many of his countrymen, was appalled by the horror of war and the decimation of Germany. Europe would soon encounter a different Germany as Hitler gained power. An aspiring artist, Hitler used art, much like the Romans to create a new Germany, one that reflected the ideas of the Nazi regime.

Art produced after 1945 also reflects the cultural and social issues of the day. As the century progressed, cohesive movements that were common in Europe and the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries were replaced with individual modes of expression. New media, such as television, added another dimension to artistic production. The very definition of art was challenged, making the sixties and seventies an exciting, yet problematic time for historians.

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Take all tests and quizzes.
  3. Participate in class discussions and projects.
  4. Complete all assigned papers.
  5. Make assigned presentations.
  6. Participate in a field trip.

Prerequisites

Completion of the General Education Core Curriculum.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

400-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of Stalin’s Russia and the role of women through the prism of Suzanne Collins’s trilogy The Hunger Games. (3)

Course Content

The bestselling trilogy The Hunger Games (2008), Catching Fire (2009), and Mockingjay (2010) by Suzanne Collins, provides a frame for discussing seminal events in Russia’s political and cultural history during the early decades of the twentieth century. The fate of Collins’s heroine Katniss Everdeen serves as a basis for analyzing how totalitarian systems attempt to determine women’s lives. Course materials draw from the 1920s and 1930s, specifically, Soviet propaganda art, novels, magazines, and films, as well as biographies of renowned women, to examine the types of heroines and villains in Stalin’s Russia. The course emphasizes the construction of individual and collective identities, especially female identity, in both the nascent Soviet Union and the fictional Panem. This is achieved by studying the interaction and relationship between the totalitarian state (both imaginary and real) and women, who conform to or resist its dominion.

The course concludes with a study of how current developments in politics and popular culture relate to perceptions of Russia’s political past, present and future.

Nature of Course

Students will be able to list three Russian novels and films from the 1920s and 1930s. Students will identify a novelist’s point of view, his or her characterization of protagonists and antagonists, and the novel’s symbolism. Students will carry out basic analyses of film elements: framing, mise-en-scene, and music, and the roles of these elements in creating a cinematic experience

Student Expectations

  1. Attend class regularly.
  2. Take all tests and quizzes.
  3. Participate in class discussions.
  4. Complete all assigned papers.

Prerequisites

None

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Origin and development of the English Language, including grammatical forms, principles of sound change, and growth of English vocabulary.

Course Content

  1. Basic linguistic concepts and interrelationship of language and culture.
  2. English phonology and phonemes.
  3. The Indo-European languages - a brief history of the people and their languages.
  4. Old English
  5. Middle English
  6. Early Modern English
  7. Present Day English

Nature of Course

Students will acquire

  1. An understanding of the systematic nature of historical linguistic principles and the specific changes characterizing the English language at its various stages.
  2. Knowledge of the intimate connections between language and culture.
  3. Understanding and appreciation of English literature through investigation of the linguistic context producing literary works.
  4. Ability to pursue directed research into the linguistic aspects of a particular discipline or subject.

Student Expectations

  1. Class attendance and participation.
  2. Completion of assigned readings and work sheets as required.
  3. Completion of brief, informal writings as required.
  4. Completion of extensive research project.
  5. Oral presentation of research findings.
  6. Satisfactory performance on 5-6 examinations.

Prerequisites

Completion of lower division General Education courses.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

Principles of Language is a study of the nature of language including its systems, role in society, historical and social changes, the development of writing systems, first and second language acquisition process, the biological foundations of language, and artificial or machine languages.

Course Content

Students review the nature of language (origins, human and animal), the systems of language (morphology, syntax, semantics, phonology), sociology and linguistics (dialects, genderlect, the evolution of language families and of language, the role of slang and jargon), the development of writing systems around the world, psychology and linguistics (how people acquire a first, second, third, etc. language), animal "language", the brain's role in processing language, and the development of synthetic languages (e.g. computerized language, audix or voice mail messages).

Nature of Course

Emphasis is placed upon the general themes of language, its role in society and its psychological bases rather than on the specific discussion of any one language. Comparisons across languages, dialects, and societies are made. The role of language in the student's discipline is explored. Cooperative Learning groups in which students actively apply the content of the readings and the lectures to solve problems forms the basis of the presentation of material. Assigned readings and lectures are designed to highlight areas of discussion. Oral presentations followed by questions and answers is required.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to complete all readings, to participate actively in their assigned groups, and to write brief reports on topics and problems covered. The mid-term exam involves the analysis of a piece of writing related to the student's discipline. An oral presentation and a final paper on a topic of the student's choice which integrates the topics of the course is required.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A course in rhetorical criticism, exploring how rhetorical theories help us process and appreciate the substance of speeches and the effectiveness of speakers.

Course Content

Students will be introduced to the major research and principles of rhetorical theory and rhetorical criticism. The class will cover the nature of criticism and constituents of the Rhetorical Act. Also historical leaders of social change will be focused on to demonstrate instances of both the principles of rhetorical theory and rhetorical criticism.

Nature of Course

This class will most notably integrate subject matter and approaches from areas catalogued under “Perspective on Individual Expression” and “Perspective on Human Institutions.” Material relating to Oral Expression and Written expression will assist the analysis of message elements – elements such as structure, coherence, development, oral style, and language devices. Material relating to Development of a Major Civilization, Political Systems, and Social Systems will inform the analysis of contextual element and the understanding of speaker and audience(s), as well as suggest the impact of a message. In other words, students will have to understand how past events as well as contemporary events impact a speaker’s rhetorical “mission” and choices, as well as to understand what impact the speaker seems to have had and on what bases.

Student Expectations

Students are expected to read assigned material, participate in class discussions and activities, and perform satisfactorily on examinations and quizzes. Also they will complete assigned papers and presentations satisfactorily, including locating and gathering quality research materials upon which they base their analyses of particular instances of public discourse. Students will gather materials that illuminate the historical setting/ context as well as scholarly materials that assist their analysis of rhetorical elements.

Prerequisites

Junior standing.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of the social and legal issues that have influenced public K – 12 education.

Course Content

The course involves a study of social and legal issues influencing public education. Topics such as religion and prayer in public schools, the controversy surrounding evolution and intelligent design in science classes, Pledge of Allegiance and moment of silence laws, home schooling, bullying, surveillance cameras and other emerging technology in classrooms and hallways, discrimination, student and educator rights, and school safety will be discussed from a social, historical, and legal perspective.

Nature of Course

---

Student Expectations

  1. Locate, read and critique assigned texts, legal opinions, and articles as measured by an oral presentation of a legal brief selected by the student.
  2. Critically analyze and synthesize information, demonstrate the ability to identify the legal, ethical, and social values involved in complex dilemma, and provide rational and defensible solutions as measured by responding in writing and orally to dilemma scenarios.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to integrate legal, ethical, historical, and social issues with an understanding of their responsibilities as adults in society as measured by a 10-page term paper.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to seek to understand the perspective of others as measured by a self-reflection on their growth in perspective after completing the course.
  5. Attend class regularly, participate in class discussions, and submit assignments in a timely manner.

Prerequisites

Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

500-Level Senior Seminar Course

Catalog Description

A study of African Americans from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement.

Course Content

---

Nature of Course

This course will integrate subject matter and approaches from Perspectives on Human Institution s in the areas of Development of a Major Civilization and Social Systems by having students examine the African American community and its development from the end of the Civil War to the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement and how African American interacted with and changed the major political and social systems of this country. This course will also integrate material from Perspective on Individual Expression by examining the ways in which artistic and literary expressions have been instrumental in helping African Americans endure and overcome oppression and discrimination. This interdisciplinary approach will allow students to develop an enhanced understanding of the oppression directed towards African American in this country, the ongoing struggle for equality and civil rights, and the important role of the arts and individual expression in sustaining community and fostering change in American society. By integrating knowledge from these various perspectives, student will develop an understanding of the interdependency of peoples and cultures in society.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance.
  2. Participation in class discussion.
  3. Reading all materials assigned.
  4. Timely completion of all written and oral assignments, including a research paper.
  5. Demonstration of mastery of course content in three critical analysis papers.
  6. Graduate students have an additional requirement to complete two book reviews.
  7. Demonstration of computer skills in word processing and location of information.
  8. Students must abide by the university’s policies regarding academic honesty as outlined in the student handbook. Penalties for academic dishonesty range from failing the assignment and/or failing the course to expulsion from the University.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsDevelopment of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

A study of the history of the United States from colonial beginnings to 1877.

Course Content

This course will emphasize the social, intellectual and political forces which shaped America.

Since the United States is a land of immigrants, a major theme of the course will deal with the variety of peoples who migrated to America, how they interacted with those already here, and how that interaction produced a diverse and pluralistic society.

The creation and development of the American governmental system will also be an important element of the course. The role played by government in the lives of Americans and the relationship between the federal, state, and local governments is essential to an understanding of the American political process, and this relationship will receive emphasis in the course.

The study of the development of an industrial process in the nineteenth century and subsequent changes in the American social and economic life will provide students with important perspectives on the problems modern Americans have in dealing with an industrialized society.

Nature of Course

Lecture and discussion.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to take notes, perform acceptably on exams, and participate in class discussions. They will also be expected to perform satisfactorily on outside reading, research, and writing assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsDevelopment of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

A study of the history of the United States from 1877 to the present.

Course Content

This course will emphasize the social, economic, and political forces that have shaped contemporary American culture. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the impact of technology on modern society, the increasing role of the United States as a world power, and the growing diversity of American society. Among the designated General Education objectives, emphasis will be placed upon critical thinking, locating and gathering information, communication skills, and developing a multi-cultural view.

Nature of Course

This course is taught in two formats. Several sections each semester will be taught in the traditional lecture-discussion model with a written and/or oral research project. Several sections may be taught by professors who emphasize computer-mediated presentations, have an interactive course web page, and require students to develop family histories rather than the traditional research paper.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to take notes, perform acceptably on exams and participate in discussions, read assigned materials, and prepare a research project analyzing one aspect of American history and culture.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsDevelopment of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

A study of the development of African Civilization from ancient times to the present.

Course Content

  1. AFRICA BEFORE EUROPEAN COLONIZATION: Africa has had a rich past long before it was "discovered" by Europe. Using a rather broad brush, this section will deal with African history from the origins of man to the rise of Africa's great empires in the Medieval period.
  2. KINGDOMS TO COLONIES: The entrance of Europeans into Africa in the fifteenth century forever changed the continent. Among the topics covered in section two will be the trading relationships developed between African people and the Europeans, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and the development of the colonial system.
  3. MODERN AFRICA: Modern Africa is more than political history. This section will deal with the paradoxes of modern African life from its endemic poverty, ethnic discord, governmental problems, religion and the environment.

Nature of Course

Since African Civilizations deals with people very much different than themselves and covers an entire continent over an extended period of time, the course will emphasize general themes and ideas rather than an intensive examination of any particular area or people.

Throughout the semester students will be challenged to think about and analyze issues both individually and as a group. The discussion method will be employed extensively for maximum student involvement.

Student Expectations

To help develop skills in information gathering and written communication, each student will be required to do some research and writing. Examinations will include a variety of question types, but there will be some essay on all tests so students may elaborate more effectively.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsDevelopment of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

A survey of the history of Chinese Civilization from its inception in Ancient times to the contemporary period. The course includes an examination of the cultural, social, economic and political forces which have shaped Chinese Civilization.

Course Content

---

Nature of Course

  1. To introduce students to the character of Chinese civilization both as background to contemporary institutions and as a major force in world development.
  2. To place the development of a civilization within a general historical context in order to provide students with a perspective of their own society's place within the experience of mankind.
  3. To foster an understanding of the interplay of politics, economics, religion and philosophy, social organization, art and literature by observing, over a sustained time period, the manner in which alternations in one bring on changes in the others.
  4. To teach the historical method as a means of critical thinking, including the evaluation of conflicting testimony in assessing historical fact and assisting students in applying this historical perspective to the major trends examined.

Student Expectations

  1. Regular class attendance
  2. Maintenance of class notes subject to review by the instructor
  3. Participation in class discussions
  4. Reading all assigned materials
  5. Timely completion of all written and oral assignments, including a research paper
  6. Demonstration of mastery of course content
  7. Demonstration of mastery of course methodology.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsDevelopment of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

A survey of the history of Islamic Civilization from the time of Muhammad until the present.

Course Content

This course involves an historical study of the development of Islamic Civilization from Muhammad until the present. Study will center on the Islamic heartland of the Middle East and North Africa. Stress will be placed on understanding the unique aspects of the Civilization's culture, social organization and political development, with particular attention being given to Islamic religion as a factor in shaping other aspects of the Civilization. The first half of the course will be primarily concerned with learning what constitutes the traditional elements of Islam, while the second half will concern Islam in the modern world and such contemporary problems as the Arab-Israeli conflict, Middle Eastern oil and Islamic revolution.

Nature of Course

Lecture discussion.

Student Expectations

The subject matter will be dealt with through both lecture and class discussion. The textbook will be supplemented with additional readings and each student will be required to research and write a short paper. Examinations will include a variety of types of questions with special stress placed on essay questions. Students will be expected to maintain lecture notes, participate in class discussions, complete all assignments by the required date and take all tests and examinations.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Perspectives on Human InstitutionsDevelopment of a Major Civilization

Catalog Description

A survey of Latin American civilization from Pre-Columbian times to the present with emphasis on the mixture of cultures and the struggle for modernity, including an examination of cultural, social, economic and political forces which have shaped Latin American Civilization.

Course Content

  1. To understand a diverse area of the world such as Latin America, one must begin with the Pre-Columbian Civilizations of the Aztec of Ancient Mexico, the Maya of Yucatan, and the Inca of Peru. These cultures were similar in many ways to the ancient Bronze Age cultures of the Old World. The course will focus on their history, economics, society, art, and religion.
  2. The conquest of the Pre-Columbian Civilizations by the Spanish and Portuguese began a great mixing of the European and Amerindian peoples which continues. It also created a long colonial period culminating in the Latin American Wars for Independence, a major event in the Atlantic World.
  3. Studying the modern world of Latin American Civilization, the course will focus on the problems of nation building. Emphasis will be upon Mexico, Cuba, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, and Peru. Attention will be drawn to the problems of democracy and dictatorship, economic development, and the place of the arts in Latin American society.

Nature of Course

The subject matter will be dealt with through lectures and/or class discussion.

Student Expectations

Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and complete all assignments.

Prerequisites

None.

Corequisites

None.

Credit Hours

3

Contact

573.651.2207
generaleducation@semo.edu
Academic Hall 132

General Education Program
One University Plaza, MS 3400
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701