Ellermeier photo

Jeremy  Ellermeier, Ph. D.

Assistant Professor of Biology

jellermeier@semo.edu
(573) 651-2384
Office: Rhodes Hall  311

Teaches: Immunology, Pathogenic Microbiology, General Microbiology, Microorganisms and Their Human Hosts, Bacterial Genetics
Advises: Microbiology, Cellular and Molecular Biology, and Biotechnology

Education:    

Postdoc, Microbiology – University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign, 2012-2015

Postdoc, Microbiology and Immunology – University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 2008-2011

Ph.D. Microbiology – University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign, 2008

B.S. Agronomy – University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2002

Research:      

I am a bacterial geneticist by training. In my research, I use molecular biology and genetics to study fundamental processes of bacterial cells.  My primary interest is understanding the genetic regulation of critical processes in the human pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.  One example of this is my interest in the twin arginine translocation (Tat) system.  Tat is a protein secretion system that moves proteins from the cytoplasm of gram negative cells into the periplasmic space between the inner and outer membrane.  Once in the periplasmic space, the exported protein can be further exported outside of the cell entirely, or it can be inserted into the outer membrane of the cell to perform a required job.  The Tat secretion system is required to move a specific subset of proteins to the bacterial periplasm and therefore must be activated and expressed at the appropriate time.  Little is known about the gene expression of this system.  As such, the genetic regulation of the tat genes is an interesting topic for study.  If you are interested in doing research in my lab, please contact me. 

Personal:

In my free time I enjoy running, doing home improvement projects, and spending time with my wife and two girls.

Selected publications:

Golubeva, Y.A., J.R. Ellermeier, J.E. Cott Chubiz, and J.M. Slauch.  2016.  Intestinal long chain fatty acids act as a direct signal to modulate expression of the Salmonella SPI1 T3SS. mBio. doi: 10.1128/mBio.02170-15.

Golubeva, Y.A., A.Y. Sadik, J.R. Ellermeier, and J.M. Slauch.  2012.  Integrating Global Regulatory Input into the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 Type III Secretion System.  Genetics. 190 (1): 79-90.

Saini, S., J.R. Ellermeier, J.M. Slauch, and C.V. Rao.  2010.  The role of coupled positive feedback in the expression of the SPI1 type three secretion system in Salmonella. PLoS Pathogens.  6 (7): 1-16.

Ellermeier, J.R. and J.M. Slauch.  2008.  Fur Regulates Expression of the Salmonella SPI1 Type Three Secretion System through HilD.  Journal of Bacteriology.  190:476-486.

Ellermeier, J.R. and J.M. Slauch.  2007.  Regulation of the SPI1 Type Three Secretion System in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.  Review.  Current Opinion in Microbiology.  10 (1): 24-29.

Ellermeier, C.D., J.R. Ellermeier, and J.M. Slauch.  2005.  HilD, HilC and RtsA Constitute a Feed Forward Loop That Controls Expression of the SPI1 Type Three Secretion System Regulator HilA in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.  Molecular Microbiology.  57: 691-705.

Contact

573.651.2170
jchampine@semo.edu
Rhodes Hall 224
Department of Biology
One University Plaza, MS 6200
Cape Girardeau, Missouri 63701